Benjamin Roberts (bjrobe@umich.edu) PowerPoint Presentation, PPT - DocSlides

Download lindy-dunigan | 2018-03-13 | General "What Can 35 Years and Over 600,000 Measurements Tell Us About Noise Exposure in the Mining Industry?". Mining has been around for along time. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hematite#/media/File:WLA_hmns_Hematite.jpg. ID: 649602

Benjamin Roberts (bjrobe@umich.edu) PowerPoint Presentation, PPT - DocSlides Slideshow

53-7062:“Laborers and Material Movers, Hand”


  • Views 3
Download this presentation

Benjamin Roberts (bjrobe@umich.edu) PowerPoint Presentation, PPT - DocSlides

Click below link (As may be) to get this presentation.

Download Note - The PPT/PDF document "Benjamin Roberts (bjrobe@umich.edu) Powe..." is the property of its rightful owner. Permission is granted to download and print the materials on this web site for personal, non-commercial use only, and to display it on your personal computer provided you do not modify the materials and that you retain all copyright notices contained in the materials. By downloading content from our website, you accept the terms of this agreement.

Presentations text content in Benjamin Roberts (bjrobe@umich.edu) PowerPoint Presentation, PPT - DocSlides

Slide1

Benjamin Roberts(bjrobe@umich.edu)

"What Can 35 Years and Over 600,000 Measurements Tell Us About Noise Exposure in the Mining Industry?"

Slide2

Mining has been around for along time

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hematite#/media/File:WLA_hmns_Hematite.jpg

First iron mine ~43,000 years ago!

Slide3

Overall mining has become safer

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/UserFiles/statistics/10g03aaa_1911-2010.svg

Slide4

Overall mining has become safer

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/UserFiles/statistics/13g10aaa.svg

Slide5

76% of mine workers are exposed to noise that required them to “speak in a raised voice” (Tak

et al. 2009)

24.3% of mine workers interviewed in the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) reported having hearing difficulty (

Tak et al. 2008)This is the second highest employment sector, after railroad workers (34.8%)

11.4% of the total working population reported hearing difficulty

But noise is still a major problem

Slide6

Q1: Have noise levels decreased over the years? If so, by how much?

Q2:What is the 8hr time weighted average (TWA) exposure for different job groups? How has this changed over the years?

What we wanted to know

Slide7

Statistical Methods and Corresponding Results

https://xkcd.com/552/

Slide8

Grant # R21OH0 10482: Development of a US/Canadian Job Exposure Matrix (JEM) for NoiseCurrently just over 1 million full shift noise measurements

Data from industry, government, and the published literature

Over 600,000 noise measurements from MSHA!

The US/CAN Noise JEM

MSHA

OSHA

NIOSH

Slide9

A lot of effort was put in to datacleaning and standardizing job titles

Job titles -> 2010 Standard

Occupational Classification (SOC)

Industry -> 2012 North American Industry Classification System (NAICS)

Mine type, year, exposure data all provided by MSHA

Making sense of the data

Slide10

656,371 full shift noise measurements546,062 – MSHA PEL

PEL = 90 dBA, ER = 5, Threshold = 90 dBA

110,309-MSHA Al

AL =85 dBA, ER = 5 dB, Threshold = 80 dBA302 string job titles -> 61 SOC titles

111 string “industry” titles -> 5, 4-digit NAICS codesThe OSHA PEL data provided mine type information for some measurementsFacility: 63,068; Surface: 339,288; Underground: 143,706

Basic information about the dataset

Slide11

Q1: Have noise levels decreased over the years? If so, by how much?

Slide12

Q1: Have noise levels decreased over the years? If so, by how much?

1999- New MSHA noise standard released;

went in to effect Sept 13. 2000

Slide13

That’s great, but…

Slide14

That’s great, but…

MSHA

PEL measurements only.

< 2000

≥

85 dBA

≥

90 dBA

≥

100 dBA

≥

105 dBA

N

Coal Mine

61.07

%

24.09

%

1.62

%

0.30

%

92,488

Metal Mine

52.66

%

27.14

%

5.00

%

1.79

%

19,032

Non-Metal

53.51

%

23.11

%

1.92

%

0.43

%

205,491

Overall

55.66

%

23.64

%

2.02

%

0.48%317,011≥2000Coal Mine31.49%15.89%3.06%1.26%110,175Metal Mine40.59%19.87%2.65%0.38%4,792Non-Metal22.02%7.41%0.57%0.15%101,546Overall27.25%12.00%1.88%0.72%216,513

Slide15

Q2:What is the 8hr time weighted average (TWA) exposure for different job titles?

Slide16

Percentage

of Job Title Distribution

Job

Category

MSHA

PEL

MSHA AL

Unexposed

0.11

%

0.13

%

Construction (47-(1-4)xxx)

2.19%

3.06%

Miners (SOC:

47-5xxx)

78.74%

84.68

%

Maintenance

(SOC: 49-xxxx)

5.54

%

5.88

%

Production (SOC:

51-xxxx)

21.05

%

0.77

%

Material Movers (SOC: 53-xxxx)

11.37

%

5.48

%

Total Sample Size

546,062

110,309

Who do we have the most data for?

Slide17

What are their exposures?

Exceedance fraction

by broad occupational groups

MSHA PEL

>85

>90

>100

>105

N

Unexposed

24.8%

9.1%

0.8%

0.2%

618

Miners

46.5%

20.8%

2.2%

0.7%

429,992

Construction

23.5%

7.1%

0.6%

0.1%

11,960

Maintenance

31.9%

10.9%

1.2%

0.4%

30,225

Production

31.9%

11.2%

1.0%

0.4%

11,168

Material Movers

39.4%

12.9%

0.7%

0.1%

62,099

MSHA AL

Unexposed

14.4%

4.3%

1.4

%0.7%139Miners53.5%28.6%4.5%1.7%93,410Construction31.1%28.6%1.3%0.4%3,377Maintenance36.7%18.8%3.5%1.4%6,482Production33.6%18.2%4.8%2.9%854Material Movers37.5%15.9%1.9%0.8%6,047

Slide18

Let’s take a look…

Slide19

Let‘s try again…

Clearly there is a relationship between year and exposure….

But what about:

Type of mine (Facility, Surface, Underground)?

What’s being mined for (Coal, Metal, Non-metal)?

Slide20

MSHA PEL Only

r

2

=0.1424Coefficients (in dBA)Year Centered (to 1996)

= (-0.35)Facility (Reference) < Surface (0.10) < Underground (1.59)Non-Metal (-0.92) < Coal (Reference) < Metal (0.24)

Results of linear model

Slide21

Validated using the holdout method70% of the data went to

training set

30

% went to test setOn average, the absolute mean difference between the model predictions and test set was

4.0 dBANot surprising given the wide date range and the inherent variability in occupational exposures (Rappaport et al. 1993)

How “good” are the predictions?

Slide22

Traditional mining job titles

Job

Title

Predicted

Dataset

Difference

Crushing, Grinding, and Polishing Machine

79.2

81.8

-2.6

Mining Machine Operators, All Other

80.6

82.7

-2.0

Cutting and Slicing Machine Setters, Operator

80.6

82.0

-1.3

Extraction Workers, All Other

85.1

85.9

-0.8

Mine Shuttle Car Operators

78.8

79.4

-0.6

Mine Cutting and Channeling Machine Operator

84.0

84.2

-0.3

Continuous Mining Machine Operators

82.8

82.7

0.1

Mining Machine Operators

79.6

79.3

0.2

Roof Bolters, Mining

84.3

84.1

0.3

Explosives Workers, Ordnance Handling

81.3

81.0

0.3

Loading Machine Operators, Underground Mining

84.7

84.0

0.7

Earth Drillers, Except Oil and Gas82.782.00.7Helpers--Extraction Workers84.583.51.0

Slide23

Noise exposure in the mining industry has been decreasingThere still many workers who are potentially exposure to hazardous noise

And a small number of workers may actually worse off

While we are most concerned with miners, there are support occupations that may also be exposed

Predicted exposures created using this data tends to is pretty good for mining jobs

Not as good for other jobs from other professions

In conclusion

Slide24

Continue updating the JEM as new data is receivedWork on developing more sophisticated models to (hopefully) improve prediction ability

Provide a publicly accessible website where workers and other interested parties can view this information

Next steps

Slide25

Rick NeitzelKan SunStephanie Sayler

Rachel Long

National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health

Grant # R21OH0 10482: Development of a US/Canadian Job Exposure Matrix (JEM) for Noise

Acknowledgements

Slide26

Any questions?

Slide27

1. Bauer ER, Babich

DR,

Vipperman

JR. Equipment Noise and Worker Exposure in the Coal Mining Industry. 2006;(Inf. Cir. 9492). 2. Bauer ER. Hearing loss greater than 25 dB . Hearing loss greater than.

3. Matetic RJ, Randolph R, Kovalchik PG. Hearing Loss in the Mining Industry: The Evolution of NIOSH and Bureau of Mines Hearing Loss Research [Internet]. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/UserFiles/works/pdfs/hlitmi.pdf

4. Rappaport SM, Kromhout H, Symanski E. Variation of Exposure Between Workers in Homogeneous Exposure Groups. Am

Ind Hyg Assoc J. 1993;54(11):654–62. 5. Tak

S, Calvert GM. Hearing difficulty attributable to employment by industry and occupation: an analysis of the National Health Interview Survey--United States, 1997 to 2003. J Occup Environ Med. 2008;50:46–56. 6.

Tak S, Davis RR, Calvert GM. Exposure to hazardous workplace noise and use of hearing protection devices among US workers--NHANES, 1999-2004. Am J Ind Med [Internet]. 2009 May [cited 2014 May 29];52(5):358–71. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19267354

7. SUBCHAPTER M — UNIFORM MINE HEALTH REGULATIONS PART 62 — OCCUPATIONAL NOISE. 30 CFR 62; 2014. 8. Mining Topic: Hearing Loss Prevention Overview [Internet]. 2015. Available from: http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/topics/HearingLossPreventionOverview.html9. Title: 30 Mineral Resources Parts 1 to 199. United States; 2014.

References

Slide28

Slide 2: Google maps; http://news.psu.edu/sites/default/files/styles/threshold-992/public/old%20time%20mining%20photo.jpg?itok=GiwwtbAI

;

http://news.psu.edu/photo/348445/2015/03/16/low-seam-continuous-mining-machine

;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hematite#/media/File:WLA_hmns_Hematite.jpgSlide 9: https://metrouk2.files.wordpress.com/2015/04/89272285.jpg?w=620&h=414&crop=1

Photo Credits

Slide29

Slide30

That’s great but…

Addressing question 1:

47-1011:

“Supervisors of Extraction Workers”

47-5021:“Earth Drillers, Except Oil and Gas”

47-5041:“Continuous Mining Machine Operator”47-5061:“Roof Bolters, Mining”49-3042:

“Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics”49-9071:“Maintenance and Repair Workers”53-3032:“Heavy Truck Drivers”53-7062:

“Laborers and Material Movers, Hand”

Slide31

What if we only look at 2000 and later?

Addressing question 1:

47-1011:

“Supervisors of Extraction Workers”

47-5021:“Earth Drillers, Except Oil and Gas”

47-5041:“Continuous Mining Machine Operator”47-5061:“Roof Bolters, Mining”49-3042:

“Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanics”49-9071:“Maintenance and Repair Workers”53-3032:“Heavy Truck Drivers”

53-7062:“Laborers and Material Movers, Hand”

Recommended
Differentiated Instruction
  • 19

Differentiated Instruction

2017  Annual Meeting Agenda
  • 1

2017 Annual Meeting Agenda

Packaging Packaging Requirements
  • 8

Packaging Packaging Requirements

Research and  Innovation
  • 2

Research and Innovation

De zaak V . Bronnenmateriaal
  • 5

De zaak V . Bronnenmateriaal

The Case for Minibus Taxi Reform
  • 5

The Case for Minibus Taxi Reform

Whatâs on Our Radar,  from 30,000 to 3,000
  • 5

What’s on Our Radar, from 30,000 to 3,000

Department of Computer Science
  • 6

Department of Computer Science

Is less really  more?  Minimalism as a perspective in HCI
  • 6

Is less really more? Minimalism as a perspective in HCI

Report this Document.