Conflict Management PowerPoint Presentation, PPT - DocSlides

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. Illinois: Heritage Arts Publishing.

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Slide1

Conflict Management

Slide2

Agenda

What is Conflict?

The Struggle Spectrum

Typical Sources of Conflict

Styles of Handling Conflict

Conflict Management Tools

Wrap Up and Questions

Slide3

Discussion Question

What is conflict?

Slide4

What is Conflict?

Individuals and representatives of organizations bring their own preferences, histories, communication patterns and experiences with decision making

Culture – “How we do things”

Conflict is not about right and wrong; it’s about differences and is closely linked to change

You need to expect, promote and manage conflict throughout the life of the collaboration

Slide5

A conflict is more than just a disagreement

Conflicts continue to fester when ignored

We respond to conflicts based on our perceptions of the situation, not necessarily to an objective review of the facts

Conflicts trigger strong emotions

Conflicts are an opportunity for growth

Slide6

The Struggle Spectrum (John Keltner)

Struggles can be entered into at any stage

Stages can be skipped

De-escalation is possible at every stage

Slide7

Typical Sources of Conflict

Power Struggles

Personal customs,

languages, preferences are not being met

Vague Vision and Focus

The vision and focus

are frequently called into question

The Wrong People

People were not well chosen

in the beginning

Incomplete Desired Results and Strategies

Desired results and strategies are frequently debated

Low

Trust

Meeting convener lacks needed skills, meetings are boring, self-interests are not being disclosed, communications are poor

Lack

of Clear Authority

Home base organizations pressure for quick action, people attend infrequently, hard to find balance between full-time job and the work of the group

Slide8

Discussion Questions

What examples do you have of conflict that was managed successfully in a group setting? What was the source of the conflict? What worked well?

What examples do you have of conflict that was not managed successfully in a group setting? What was the source of the conflict? What went wrong?

Slide9

Styles of Handling Conflict

Integrating

High concern for self as well as the other party involved in conflict. It is concerned with collaboration between parties (i.e., openness, exchange of information, and examination of differences) to reach a solution acceptable to both parties

Obliging

Low concern for self and high concern for the other party involved in conflict. An obliging person attempts to play down the differences and emphasizes commonalties to satisfy the concerns of the other party

Slide10

Dominating

High concern for self and low concern for the other party involved in conflict. It has been identified with a win-lose orientation or with forcing behavior to win one’s position

Avoiding

Low concern for self as well as for the other party involved in conflict. It has been associated with withdrawal, passing-the-buck, sidestepping, or “see no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil” tactics

Slide11

Compromising

Moderate concern for self as well as the other party involved in conflict. It is associated with give-and-take or sharing whereby both parties give up something to make a mutually acceptable decision

Slide12

Conflict Management Tools

Clarify the issue

Create guidelines for working together

Create a conflict resolution process and embed it in the group’s Terms of Reference

Re-visit the group’s “original dream”

Slide13

Conflict Management Tools:Clarify the Issue

Often the conflict in the group is masked and takes time to manageSome people are quiet Some people stop coming to meetingsSomeone needs to ask, “What’s going on here?”

Slide14

Conflict Management Tools: Guidelines for Working Together

Develop

guidelines for working

together when initiating a group that will be working together over a period of time

These guidelines can be used by the group to ensure that both group and individual behaviour is positive and supportive of moving the group forward

Slide15

Process to Develop Guidelines for Working Together

Discussion Questions:

Think

of a time when you have been a part of a group or team or attended a

meeting

What

made this experience positive for you?

What

did you like about how you worked together?

Slide16

Process to Develop Guidelines for Working Together

Activity:

Have people in the group respond to the questions individually and write one idea per post-it note

Have the group theme the post-it notes into “like” categories

Name each of the categories

Slide17

Example: Guidelines for Working Together

Have fun!

Focus on task and results

Listen, support and encourage

Treat each other with respect

Create an inclusive and collaborative process

Keep an open mind

Slide18

Example: Guidelines for Working Together

EnergyGet ‘er Done

Put it on the Table

Honouring

all Voices

Slide19

Ensuring that the Guidelines are Followed

Have a discussion with the group: How do we, as a group, ensure that the guidelines are followed?

Examples from other groups:

Self

regulate

One member of the table mediates

Tell each other when the guidelines are not being followed

Have a

visual reminder

of the guidelines at

the meeting (keep them up on the screen, handout at each table, back of nametags, etc

.)

Slide20

Conflict Management Tools: Conflict Resolution Process

Revisit the destination

Decide who will facilitate the process for resolving the conflict

Separate the conflict from concepts of right and wrong

Make sure everyone is heard

Don’t burn bridges

Slide21

Conflict Management Tools:The Original Dream

Remind or ask people what originally brought them to the group: what did they want to achieve?Get people talking about common ground, shared values and mutually advantageous interdependencies

Slide22

Conflict may cause inactivity, diverted activity, confusion, undue stress or violence

AND

It may also generate learning and introduce needed changes

Slide23

Reflection

What learnings and reflections do I have from this session?

What are some potential actions for my Regional Network?

Slide24

Wrap Up and Questions

Slide25

References

Center for Right Relationship. (2005).

Organization and Relationship Systems Coaching Manual.

Robinson Jr., Jerry and Roy Clifford. (1976).

Conflict Management in Community Groups

. Illinois: University of Illinois, Department of Agricultural Economics.

The Struggle Spectrum. Retrieved from:

http://oregonstate.edu/instruct/comm440-540/struggle.htm

Winer

, Michael and Karen Ray. (1994).

Collaboration Handbook: Creating, Sustaining and Enjoying the Journey

. Minnesota: Amherst H. Wilder Foundation.

Yarborough, Elaine. (1985).

Constructive Conflict

. Illinois: Heritage Arts Publishing.

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