STAMP ACT 1765 PowerPoint Presentations (PPT's)

dshistory | 21-05-17 | History The Stamp Act of 1765 (short title Duties in American Colonies Act 1765; 5 George III, c. 12) was an Act of the Parliament of Great Britain that imposed a direct tax on the colonies of British America and required that many printed materials in the colonies be produced on stamped paper produced in London, carrying an embossed revenue stamp .Printed materials included legal documents, magazines, playing cards, newspapers, and many other types of paper used throughout the colonies. Like previous taxes, the stamp tax had to be paid in valid British currency, not in colonial paper money. The purpose of the tax was to help pay for troops stationed in North America after the British victory in the Seven Years' War and its North American theater of the French and Indian War. The Americans said that there was no military need for the soldiers because there were no foreign enemies on the continent, and the Americans had always protected themselves against Indians. They suggested that it was actually a matter of British patronage to surplus British officers and career soldiers who should be paid by London.

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Slide1

STAMP ACT

Slide2

The Stamp Act was passed on March 22, 1765, leading to an uproar in the colonies over an issue that was to be a major cause of the Revolution: taxation without representation. Enacted in November 1765, the controversial act forced colonists to buy a British stamp for every official document they obtained. The stamp itself displayed an image of a Tudor rose framed by the word “America” and the French phrase 

Honi

soit

qui mal y

pense

–“Shame to him who thinks evil of it.”

Slide3

THE REPEAL OF THE STAMP ACT IMPORTANT

After months of protest, and an appeal by Benjamin Franklin before the British House of Commons, Parliament voted to 

repeal

 the 

Stamp Act

 in March 1766. However, the same day, Parliament passed the Declaratory 

Acts

, asserting that the British government had free and total legislative power over the colonies.

Slide4

HOW MUCH TAX ON THE STAMP ACT?

In 1765, the average taxpayer in England paid 

26 shillings

 per year in taxes, while the average colonist paid only one- half to one and a half shillings. Prime Minister Grenville thought that the American colonists should bear a heavier tax load. To this end, Parliament passed the Stamp Act in March 1765.

Slide5

WHO OPPOSED THE STAMP ACT

The Stamp Act was passed by the 

British

 Parliament on March 22, 1765. The new tax was imposed on all American colonists and required them to pay a tax on every piece of printed paper they used. Ship's papers, legal documents, licenses, newspapers, other publications, and even playing cards were taxed.

Slide6

THE STAMP ACT LEAD UP TO THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR

Although resented, the Sugar 

Act

 tax was hidden in the cost of import duties, and most colonists accepted it. The 

Stamp Act

, however, was a direct tax on the colonists

and

led

 to an uproar in 

America

 over an issue that was to be a major 

cause

 of

the

Revolution

: taxation without representation.

 

Slide7

THE STAMP ACT COME TO AN END

The 

Stamp Act

 was passed on March 22, 1765, but the 

Stamp Act

 Congress (a group of people from nine colonies) came together to form a statement protesting the 

Stamp Act

. This was the first action of protesting the 

Stamp Act

. Finally, British Parliament stopped the 

Stamp Act

 in 1776.

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