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SRJISBIMONTHYJAVEED AHMAD PUJU YASHPAL NETRAGAONKAR


670-676AUG-SEPT-2014 VOL-I ISSUE-V wwwsrjiscomPage 670SELF CONCEPT AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF UNDER-GRADUATE MALE AND FEMALE STUDENTS OF KASHMIRJaveed AhmadPuju PhDAssistant

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Document on Subject : "SRJISBIMONTHYJAVEED AHMAD PUJU YASHPAL NETRAGAONKAR"— Transcript:

1 SRJIS/BIMONTHY/JAVEED AHMAD PUJU, YASHPA
SRJIS/BIMONTHY/JAVEED AHMAD PUJU, YASHPAL NETRAGAONKAR ( 670 - 676 ) AUG - SEPT - 2014, VOL - I , ISSUE - V www.srjis.com Page 670 SELF CONCEPT AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT OF UNDER - GRADUATE MALE AND FEMALE STUDENTS OF KASHMIR Javeed Ahmad Puju , Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Directorate of Distance Education, University of Kashmir, J&K, India Y ashpal D Netragaonkar , Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Abhinav College of Education Pune The aim of the study was to compare the undergraduate male and female students on self - concept and academic achievement. The sample for the present study consisted of 600 students in which 300 were undergraduate male students and 300 undergraduate female students. The investigators used Sagar and Sharma self - concept inventory to assess the self concept of sample subjects. The previous two years academic achievement served as academic indicator of the sample subjects. The investigator used various statistical techniques viz , mean, S.D., t - test to analyze the data. The statistical data revealed that there is significant difference between undergraduate male and female students on self - concept and no significance difference was found between male and female undergraduate stude nts on academic achievement. Undergraduate male students were found to have better self concept as compared to their counterparts. Male and female undergraduate students were somewhat similar on academic achievement. Keywords: self - concept, academic ac hievement, undergraduate, male and female INTRODUCTION : The self - concept is an internal model which comprises self - a ssessments. Features assessed include but are not limited to: personality , skills and abilities, Scholarly Research Journal's is licensed Based on a work at www.srjis.com 4.194, 2013 SJIF © SRJIS2014 Abstract SRJIS/BIMONTHY/JAVEED AHMAD PUJU, YASHPAL NETRAGAONKAR ( 670 - 676 ) AUG - SEPT - 2014, VOL - I , ISSUE - V www.srjis.com Page 671 occupation(s) and hobbies, physical characteristics, etc. F or example, the statement "I am lazy" is a self - assessment that co

2 ntributes to the self - concept. However
ntributes to the self - concept. However, the statement "I am tired" would not be part of someone's self - concept, since being tired is a temporary state and a more objective judgment. A person 's self - concept may change with time as reassessment occurs, which in extreme cases can lead to identity crises . Another model of self - concept contain s three parts: self - esteem, stability, and self - efficacy. Self - esteem is the "evaluative" component — it is where one makes judgments about his or her self - worth. Stability refers to the organization and continuity of one's self - concept. Is it constantly in flux? Can singular, relatively trivial events drastically affect your self - esteem? The third element, self - efficacy, is best explained as self - confidence. It is specifically connected with one's abilities, unlike self - esteem. Researchers debate when self - c oncept development begins but agree on the importance of person’s life. Tiedemann (2333) indicates that parents’ gender stereotypes and expectations for their children impact children’s understandings of themselves by approximately age 0. Others suggest th at self - concept develops later, around age 7 or 8, as children are developmentally prepared to begin interpreting their own feelings, abilities and interpretations of feedback they receive from parents, teachers and peers about themselves. Despite differin g opinions about the onset of self - concept development, researchers agree on the importance of one’s self - concept, influencing people’s behavior and cognitive and emotional outcomes including (but not limited to) academic achievement, levels of happiness, anxiety, social integration, self - esteem, and life - satisfaction. Borncl and Montrsre K. (2004) have found that there is a significant difference between male and female students in mental health and academic achievements. The students from small families have high mental health and academic achievement than the students from large family. Today’s self - esteem as one of the influential factor which affect student’s academic achievement has received increasing attention. It has been declared that high self - esteem can lead

3 to high academic achievement. The Self
to high academic achievement. The Self - esteem can be referred as person 's global judgments of competency regarding one's self - worth ( Harter, 1988 ). This construct emerges when children compare their self - evaluation with actual performance o n a variety of tasks. Moreover, this comparison between the perceived self and the ideal self is very crucial specially during adolescence because adolescents encounter with diversified job of developing and challenges of their own age. Hence, development of self - esteem is considered as one of the most important developmental processes of adolescence ( Sirin and Rogers - Sirin, 2004 ). SRJIS/BIMONTHY/JAVEED AHMAD PUJU, YASHPAL NETRAGAONKAR ( 670 - 676 ) AUG - SEPT - 2014, VOL - I , ISSUE - V www.srjis.com Page 672 In general, high self - esteem help indi viduals to view themselves as active and capable persons to promote changes through effort and set higher goals which cause learning new things. Interestingly, numerous researchers have demonstrated that the best way to improve student achievement is to in crease their self - esteem ( Rubie et al ., 2004 ). Research has also documented that high self - esteem plays an important role in academic achievement, social and personal responsibility ( Redenbach, 1991 ). Those who have higher academic achievement tend to feel more confident in contrast those who lack confidence in themselves achieve les s. Additionally, gender is the important factor which influence on the growth, emerges and demonstration of self - esteem. Numerous differences have been found between males and females in their level of self - esteem during adolescence because they tend to ad opt to gender stereotypes. Specifically, male self - esteem are thought to be more impressed by goals characterized by independence and autonomy, while self - esteem in female is more influenced by goals related to interdependence and sensitivity ( Cross and Slater, 1995 ). The difference in self - esteem can lead to difference in academic achievement between boys and girls. It has been reaveled that girls do better in school, get higher grades and can graduate from high school at a higher level th

4 an boys ( Jacob, 2002 ). Previous study
an boys ( Jacob, 2002 ). Previous study showed the other influential factors in academic achievement ( Kara and Kahraman, 2008 ). However, the present study revealed the important role of self - esteem in academic achievement. In other words, the present study aimed to investigate the relationship between self - esteem and academic achievement as well as gain insight into the differences in self - esteem and academic achievement between boys and girls. This study endeavored to provide information for educators, cou nselors and teachers to apply strategies to prevent imbalance in academic achievement and self - esteem between male and female students in the classroom. OBJECTIVES OF THE ST UDY The following objectives were formulated for the present investigation. 1. To stud y Self - concept of male and female. 2. To study the Academic Achievement of male and female. 3. To c ompare the male and female on Self concept. 4. To compare the male and female on Academic Achievement HYPOTHESES The following hypotheses were formulated for the present investigation. SRJIS/BIMONTHY/JAVEED AHMAD PUJU, YASHPAL NETRAGAONKAR ( 670 - 676 ) AUG - SEPT - 2014, VOL - I , ISSUE - V www.srjis.com Page 673 1. There is no significant difference between male and female on self concept 2. There is no significant difference between male and female on academic achievement. OPERTATIONAL DEFINATIONS OF TERMS AND VARIABLES: 1. Self - concept: Self conce pt also called self - construction , self - identity or self - perspective is a multi - dimensional construct that refers to an individual's perception of "self" in relation to any number of characteristics, such as academics (and nonacademic’s), gender roles and sexuality, racial identity, and many others. 2. Academic Achievement : Academic achievement of male and female secondary students refers to the knowledge attained and skills developed in the school subjects. So, academic achievement means the achievement of students in academic subjects. For this purpose, the aggregate Mark s obtained by the subjects in previous two exams served as measures of academic achievement.

5 SAMPLE The sample for the present stud
SAMPLE The sample for the present study consisted of 600 undergraduate students (300 male and 300 female) selected randomly from degree colleges. The breakup of the sample are as under: Group N Total Boys 300 600 Girls 300 Tools Used The data for the present study was collected with the help of the self concept inventory (Real Self and Ideal Self) by Sagar and Sharma. ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION Table 1 : S howing the mean comparison of Male and female Students on Ideal Self Dimension of Self concept (N= 30 in each group) Level of Significance t - value S.D Mean N Group Significant at 0.05 Level 2.63 5.4 165 30 Male 3.2 162 30 Female The table 1 shows the mean comparison of male and female undergraduate students on Ideal self dimension of self concept inventory. The calculated t - value (2.63) is greater than the tabulated t - value at 0.05 level of significance, which depicts that there is significance difference SRJIS/BIMONTHY/JAVEED AHMAD PUJU, YASHPAL NETRAGAONKAR ( 670 - 676 ) AUG - SEPT - 2014, VOL - I , ISSUE - V www.srjis.com Page 674 between male and female students on Ideal s elf of Self concept inventory. The above result clarifies that male students have better Ideal self than female students. Table 2: S howing the mean comparison of Male and female Students on Real Self Dimension of Self concept Inventory (N= 30 in each group) Level of Significance t - value S.D Mean N Group Significant at 0.01 Level 3.50 4.47 167 30 Male 4.40 163 30 Female The table 2 shows the mean comparison of male and female undergraduate students on real self dimension of self concept inventory. The calculated t - value (3.50) is greater than the tabulated t - value at 0.01 level of significance, which depicts that there is significance difference between male and female students on Real self of Self concept inventory. The above result clarifies that male students have better Real self than female students. Table 3: S howing the mean comparison of Male and female Students on Self concept (N= 30 in each group) Level of Significance t - value S.D Mean N Group Significant at 0.01 Level 3.09 4.816

6 168 03 Male 4.024 164.5 03 Female Th
168 03 Male 4.024 164.5 03 Female The table 3 shows the mean comparison of male and female undergraduate students on Self Concept inventory. The calculated t - value (3.09) is greater than the tabulated t - value at 0.01 level of significance, which depicts that there is significance difference between male and female students on Self Concept Inventory. The above result clarifies that male students have better Self Concept than female Students. Table 4: Showing the Mean Comparison of Male and female Students on Academic Achievement (N= 30 in each group). Level of significance t - value S.D Mean N Group In Significant 0.34 7.01 66.96 30 Male 7.41 67.61 30 Female SRJIS/BIMONTHY/JAVEED AHMAD PUJU, YASHPAL NETRAGAONKAR ( 670 - 676 ) AUG - SEPT - 2014, VOL - I , ISSUE - V www.srjis.com Page 675 The table 4 shows the mean comparison of Male and female undergraduate students on academic achievement. The table reveals that there is no significant mean difference between male and female on academic achievement, which means that male and female have similar academic achievement. CONCLUSIONS The following are some of the conclusions drawn from the present study. 1. It has been found that Male and female undergraduate students differ significantly on ideal self dimension of Self Concept inventory . Male students were found to have better ideal self than female students. 2. It has been found that Male and female undergraduate students differ significantly on real self dimension of Self Concept Inventory . Male students were found to have better r eal self than female students. 3. It has been found that Male and female undergraduate students differ significantly on overall dimensions of Self Concept Inventory . Male students were found have better self concept than female students. 4. It has been found that there is no significant difference between male and female undergraduate students on academic achievement. Male and female undergraduate students were found to have somewhat similar academic achievement. REFERENCES Anderson (2004) Psychology of Physical

7 ly Handicapped children, Lond MacMilan.
ly Handicapped children, Lond MacMilan. Banui Kuotsu (1992) A study of the Value’s of College Students in Nagaland in Relation to their Self - concept, fifth survey of Educational Research; New Delhi, NCERT. Bhargav a, M. & Shah, M. A. (1971) Manual for Level of Aspiration, National Psychological Corporation – Agra. Borg, W. R., & Call, M. D. (1979) Study of Self - concept and Level of Aspiration of Handicapped Children Educational Research – An Introduction: New Yor k. Longman Co. 444 - 470. Chandra Rakesh & Koul Kabire (2006) Comparative Analysis of Visually Impaired and Orthopedically Handicapped Children on Academic Performance, Level of Education SRJIS/BIMONTHY/JAVEED AHMAD PUJU, YASHPAL NETRAGAONKAR ( 670 - 676 ) AUG - SEPT - 2014, VOL - I , ISSUE - V www.srjis.com Page 676 and Level of Aspiration in Northern Assam, 5 th Survey of Research i n Education, New Delhi: NCERT. Chaterjee, R. (1985) Self - Concept of Blind Children. Cited in Journal of Indian Education, Vol. II, No. 5 January, 1986. Eve, Kilas and Eve. Mottus (2006) Ability Grouping in School, A Study of Academic Achievement in Fi ve Schools in Estonia. American Research Journal, Vol. 15. No. 208. Fox and Faver (1991) Achievement and Aspiration, Patterns Among Male and Female Academic - Career Aspirants, Work and Occupations. Vol. 8, No. 4, 439 - 463 (1981) DOI: 10.1177/ 0730888488040 3, SAGE Publications. Kumthekar, M. (2004) A Comparative Analysis of Physically Challenged and Normal College going Students on Self - concept and Mental Health, Journal of Health Management, Vol. 7, No. 424. Metha, (2007) Academic Achievement. In Neil Davison (Ed). General Psychology (6 th Edition), New Delhi: Tata McGrawhill pp 538 - 39. Nirmani Mohammad & Tavakko Mousazadeh (2010) Comparative study of Self - esteem and Self - concept of Handicapped and Normal Students. Journal of Behaioural Psychology, Vol . 9, No. 308. Virginice Maclaren Murry Haight (2007) Level of Aspiration in Relation to Physical Self, Real Self and Ideal Self Among Lame and Visually Impaired Students in Vietnam. International Journal of Psychology, Vol. 6 th , No. 5.