Drowning: A Quick and Silent Killer
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Drowning: A Quick and Silent Killer

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Drowning: A Quick and Silent Killer




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Presentation on theme: "Drowning: A Quick and Silent Killer"— Presentation transcript:

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Drowning: A Quick and Silent Killer

In the time it takes to … …cross the room for a towel (10 seconds), a child in the bathtub can become submerged. …answer the phone (2 minutes), that child can lose consciousness. …sign for a package at your front door (4 to 6 minutes), a child submerged in the bathtub or pool can sustain permanent brain damage. www.safekids.org

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Safe Beginnings

A prevention program for Sacramento County to reduce infant sleep-related deaths and drowning-related injuries and deaths in children ages 0-5

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Funded by California Kids’ Plates

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Safe Beginnings

Program ElementsEducate Service ProvidersEducate Parents and CaregiversProgram MaterialsVideoBrochureMedia Materials

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The ABC’s of Drowning PreventionTraining for Service Providers

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Learning Objectives

After training, participants will be able to:Recognize drowning as a leading cause of preventable deaths for children under the age of 6Identify the risk factors related to drowningExplain “Layers of Protection”Identify the ABC’s of Drowning PreventionIdentify resources for additional information on Drowning PreventionUtilize tools for hosting the ABC’s of Drowning Prevention Parent/Caregiver Training

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Service Providers & Parents

Sacramento County needs an education campaign focusing on:The importance of adult supervisionBarriersCPR/swimmingInformation should be delivered by:Health Care ProfessionalsFire DepartmentsChild Care Providers

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Safe Beginnings CollaborativeParent Focus Group Responses

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What do

you know about drowning?

Drowning deaths are a major problem. (fact)

Lack of supervision was a huge problem. (fact)

Pools without barriers or barriers not used regularly are a problem. (fact)

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Most

drownings

occur in rivers and lakes. (myth)

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National Drowning Injuries & Death Statistics

Drowning is the leading cause of injury-related death among children between 1 and 4 years old. It is the third leading cause of injury-related death among children 19 and under.Statistics only show deaths, but for every…1 Drowning Death there are 4 Hospitalizations1 Hospitalization there are 4 ED Visits www.safekids.org

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National Drowning Injuries & Death Statistics

On average, 382 children younger than 15 fatally drown every year between 2010 and 2012 in pools or spas, with 76 percent (290) of the victims being younger than 5.An estimated average of 5,400 children younger than 15 were treated between 2012 and 2014 in emergency rooms for pool- or spa-related submersion injuries every year, with 77 percent of the injured being younger than 5.The annual cost of care per year in a chronic care facility for an impaired survivor of a non-fatal submersion event is $180,000 www.poolsafely.gov

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National Drowning Injuries & Death Statistics

With victims younger than 5 years old; 87 percent of the reported fatalities occurred at residential pools or spas. More than 75% of victims had been missing for 5 minutes or lessA child loses consciousness in 30 seconds or lessThe brain suffers irreparable damage in 4-6 minutes The child can die within 10 minutes.

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California Statistics

1,343 drowning deaths from 2000-2012, ages 0-1867% (899 of 1,343) of child drowning deaths occur in children 6 years of age and youngerLeading cause of injury-related death for children ages 1 through 6. CDPH EPIC

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Sacramento County

78 drowning deaths from 2000-2012, ages 0-1868% (53 of 78) of child drowning deaths occur in children 6 years of age and youngerLeading cause of injury-related death for children ages 1 through 6.100% preventable CDRT 2000-2012

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Sacramento County

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Sacramento CountyDrowning Data Ages 0-6

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Safe Beginnings Collaborative Research Results

Why do children drown?Three factors contribute to a child’s risk of drowning:The age of the childEasy access to waterInadequate adult supervision Children’s Hospital of Orange County

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Risk Factor #1 – Age

Developmentally –No fearGreater curiosityMaster new skills quicklyPhysiologically –Head weighs more than the rest of the bodyBones, tendons & muscles not fully developedCan drown in as little as 2 inches of water Children’s Hospital of Orange County

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Risk Factor #2- Easy Access to Water

Children under the age of 6 most often drown in a residential pool or spa.Lack of an effective barrier between a child and a body of water.Bodies of water include:Pool/ SpaBathtubToiletBucketRiver/LakeChildren’s Hospital of Orange County

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Risk Factor #3- Inadequate Adult Supervision

Children have more time and opportunity to access water when:Parents fail to communicate about supervisionOlder children supervising other childrenParents are intoxicated during social gatheringsParents are sleeping or distracted Children’s Hospital of Orange County

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Child Drowning myths and facts

Role playing exercise, Part 1

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Child DrowningMyths and Facts – Part 1

Myth: “Drowning takes a long time.”Fact: Children lose consciousness in 30 seconds or less. If a child is missing, always check the pool or other water sources first. Every second counts!Myth: “As long as there are other adults around, children are safe.”Fact: Children can drown even though they are surrounded by adults.Myth: “My child can’t get to the pool by himself yet.”Fact: Children don’t announce when they’ve mastered something new. Just because your child could not open a sliding glass door yesterday, does not mean he or she can’t today.Myth: “Drownings only happen to families who don’t know better.”Fact: Drownings occur in every neighborhood, socioeconomic and ethnic group, regardless of education level.

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Drowning PreventionLayers of Protection

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Drowning PreventionLayers of Protection

No single device or solution can prevent child drownings. Multiple strategies or devices (“layers”) should be used constantly and simultaneously. – NDPA“Layers of protection” are backups to the primary means of accident prevention: Responsible Adult Supervision. - APSP

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Drowning PreventionLayers of Protection

Children are most at risk in their own backyard, when parents believe they are safely inside the house.Devices can delay a child’s unsupervised access, or warn of the child’s presence. Protect the area between the house and the pool.

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Building a Sacramento Program

ResearchSurveysModels=

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Sacramento CountyABC’s of Drowning Prevention

A is for Adult SupervisionB is for BarriersC is for CPR & Classes

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A is for Adult Supervision

Supervision during non-water activitiesChildren drown without a sound69% of children who drowned in swimming pools were not expected to be in or around water so know where your children are at all times.

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A is for Adult Supervision

Supervision during water activities Children should be watched by a responsible adult 100% of the time they are in or near the water.Keep children under age 5 within arm’s reach in the waterWater wings, floaties and life jackets should never take the place of adult supervision.Assign a “water watcher”, a person who knows how to swim whenever around water.Keep children away from pool drains, pipes and other openings to avoid entrapments.

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B is for Barriers

The only proven effective barrier is a 5 feet tall non-climbable fence with self-closing, self-latching gates that completely encloses the pool. Secondary barriers include alarms and pool & spa coversInstall, inspect and always use barriers

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B is for Barriers

Remove toys from in or around the pool area. Toys can attract young children to the pool.Keep chairs, tables and other climbable things away from fence.Visit National Drowning Prevention Alliance website to learn more about layers of protection.

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B is for Barriers

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C is for CPR & Classes

Learn CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) and rescue breathing.Start CPR and rescue breathing at pool side.To find CPR classes ask at a local Red Cross, parks and recreation district or family resource center.

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C is for CPR & Classes

Enroll all children and adults in your family in swim lessons and water safety training, but remember these classes never take the place of supervision or barriers!To find swimming classes ask at a local community pool, parks and recreation district or family resource center.

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ABC’s of Drowning Prevention Video

View on Sacramento Metro Fire’s YouTube pageor go to YouTube and search “ABCs Drowning Prevention Sacramento”Video

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Child Drowning myths and facts

Role playing exercise, Part 2

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Child DrowningMyths and Facts – Part 2

Myth: “It can’t happen to me. I’m a good parent.”Fact: All parents whose children have drowned felt this way. No one believes a drowning could happen to their child or the children under their care. Without layers of protection, no child is safe from the tragedy of drowning.Myth: “My child is safe because he’s had swimming lessons.”Fact: When a child enters a pool alone, he may not behave the same way he does in a swimming lesson because no one is there to cue him to swim or behave in a certain manner.Myth: “I’ll hear my child if he’s in trouble.”Fact: Drowning is a silent event. Drowning children don’t splash, cry, or call out for help. “Kids drown without a sound”.Myth: “My child is safe because he’s inside the house with me.”Fact: Don’t assume your child is safe because you last saw him napping or playing. Toddlers move fast. Unless the child is within your direct sight, there is the possibility he is in the water.

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Training in a Box

ContentsBinderThumb DriveDVDHatWater WingsLife JacketBrochures

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Binder

Sign-In

Pretest

Posttest

Class Evaluation

Tracking Form

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Resources

Safe Kids WorldwideCPSC – Pool SafelyNational Drowning Prevention AllianceAdd local swim lesson information to your presentation

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Thank You!

Jennifer RubinSafe Kids Greater Sacramento Coalition CoordinatorDignity Health Mercy San Juan Medical Center916-864-5684Jennifer.Rubin@dignityhealth.orgwww.safekidssacramento.org

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