Celebrate  Kwanzaa
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Celebrate Kwanzaa

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Celebrate Kwanzaa




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Presentation on theme: "Celebrate Kwanzaa"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

Celebrate Kwanzaa

Celebrate The Seven Principals of Kwanzaa

Celebrate Education

Slide2

Means welcome

.

Ntoo mu Amadou Bamba le ti (Mandinka)My name is Amadou Bamba AKA Dr. David PiperI will guide you through this presentation

Kukaribisha

The name Kwanzaa derives from the Swahili phrase "matunda ya kwanza", meaning "first fruits.” The choice of Swahili, a language with its roots based in East Africa Regions, reflects its status as a symbol of Pan-Africanism, especially reflective of 1960s.

Slide3

Kwanzaa is organized around five fundamental activities:

Celebrate Kwanzaa

the

gathering of family, friends, and community;

reverence for the Elders and Ancestorscommemoration for the past, learning lessons and emulating achievements of African/African American historical figures;recommitment to the highest cultural ideals, for example, truth, justice, respect for people and nature, care for the vulnerable, andcelebration of the “Good of Life”

Slide4

Celebrate Kwanzaa

Kwanzaa

is celebrated through rituals, dialogue, narratives, poetry, dancing, singing, drumming and other music and

feastingA central practice is the lighting of the Mishumaa (seven candles) of Kwanzaa. A candle is lit each day for each of the Nguzo Saba (Seven Principals)

Slide5

DO YOU CELEBRATE KWANZAA?

Do

you strive to maintain unity in your

familyDo you set goals and act upon them firmly in spite of opposition or difficultyDo you help your friends at work, church, school, or in your communityDo you patronize African/African American owned businesses, i.e., barber and beauty salons, restaurants, or clothing stores, etc.

Slide6

DO YOU CELEBRATE

KWANZAA

Do you belong to any organization that strive to make your neighborhoods clean, and safe

Do you help plan, participate, organize or support activities that benefit our children

Do you believe that YOU CAN make a difference?

Slide7

DO YOU CELEBRATE KWANZAA

Dr. Maulana Karenga

created Kwanzaa in 1966 focused on African/African-Americans celebrating themselves and their history, rather than simply imitating the practices of the dominant society.

As an African/African American celebration Kwanzaa brings a cultural message speaking to the best of what it means to be African/African American and human in the fullest sense.

The original time frame for the ceremony and celebration is December twenty six (26) through January one (1) in any given year

Slide8

Fundamental

values found in the practice of

Kwanzaa

NGUZO SABAThe Seven Principles

LIGHTING OF THE CANDLES

Slide9

First candle is lit on December

26 of any given year

UMOJA

LIGHTING OF THE CANDLES

(OO-MO-JAH)

UNITY

to strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation

Slide10

Serve as moral guides for the community

Family unity

maintaining family identity and togetherness

balancing family priorities with support for individual needs.

creating daily routines as well as special traditions and celebrations

affirming members, connecting to family roots

Strong families is a feeling that all can depend on each other in “good” times and “bad” times.

Slide11

KUJICHAGULIA

LIGHTING OF THE CANDLES

(

KOO-GEE-CHA-GOO-LEE-

YAH)SELF-DETERMINATIONrequires that we define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves and speak for ourselves.

Second candle is lit on December 27 of any given year

Slide12

Restore lost history and culture

Particularly as a group, called African Americans, we have not looked at ourselves “naturally” since the psycho-social historical trauma of enslavement took place

We

have taken the naturalistic observation of Euro-American scientist and their armchair theorizing and have arbitrarily attributed that reality and those hypothesis to ourselvesThat’s why people of African heritage living in the United States can not remember their connection to the continent Al-kebulan (Africa).As a people of African Heritage we must recover our memory, history, culture, our ways of behaving.We must reconstruct the best of our History and Culture.

Slide13

Education

is

Healthy

Education promotes a positive self image: confidence provides enriched life experience and mental well beingEducation provides lifelong learning: increases brain cells and decreases Alzheimer’s and other degenerative brain conditions due to age

Slide14

Third

candle is lit on December

28 of any given year

UJIMA

LIGHTING OF THE CANDLES

(

OO-GEE-MAH)COLLECTIVE WORK AND RESPONSIBILITYthe principle that reminds us of our obligation and responsibility to supporting our society

Slide15

Education is Social Networking

Education helps to develop new interests

Education promotes lifelong friends including teachers, counselors and others who assist in guiding and planning

Education helps to decide a profession or field of interest; it even provides opportunities to “test drive” a profession

Slide16

Commit

Social Responsibility to the Future and to Future Generations

Education

is the Great Equalizer for Ethnic and Socio-economic conditions – it balances lifeEducation is Fun and is a Lifestyle/The Journey is Lifelong

Celebrate Education

Slide17

Fourth

candle is lit on December

29 of any given year

UJAMAA

LIGHTING OF THE CANDLES

(OO-JAH-MAH)COOPERATIVE ECONOMICSTo build and maintain our own stores, shops and other businesses and to profit from them together.

Slide18

COOPERATIVE

ECONOMICS

Essentially

a commitment to

the practice

of shared social wealth and the work

necessary

to achieve

it.

It

grows out of the fundamental

communal

concept that social wealth belongs to the

masses

of people who created it and that no one

should have

such an unequal amount of wealth that it gives

him/her

the capacity to impose

unequal, exploitative or

oppressive relations on

others

It

is

essential because

without the principle and practice of

shared wealth

. the social conditions for

exploitation oppression

and inequality as well as deprivation and

suffering are

increased.

Slide19

Fifth

candle is lit on December

30 of any given year

NIA

LIGHTING OF THE CANDLES

(NEE-AH)PURPOSE To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.

Slide20

Education Develops Life Skills

Technology

Rights as a citizen: voting, issues, environment

Reasoning skills that help in decision making, relationships, moral judgments, tolerance, reflection, and communication

Education helps to “walk in another’s

shoes”

Education provides a safe place to practice skills before entering the workplace

Slide21

Sixth

candle is lit on December

31 of any given year

KUUMBA

LIGHTING OF THE CANDLES

(KOO-OOM-BAH) is the special spirit of creativity and ingenuity that affirms the contributions of our ancestors, our entire community, and influential leaders.

Slide22

Most will change careers at least four times within a lifetime

The future will use technology not yet invented

The future will have access to information at all times in all places

The top ten in demand jobs in 2010 did not exist in 2004By 2018 the United States will need 22 million new college degrees-but will fall short of that number by at least 3 million postsecondary degreesBy 2018 the United States will need at least 4.7 million new workers with postsecondary certificates

The Future and Education

Slide23

Seventh

candle is lit on

January 1 of any given year

IMANI

LIGHTING OF THE CANDLES

(KOO-OOM-BAH)is the special spirit of creativity and ingenuity that affirms the contributions of our ancestors, our entire community, and influential leaders.

Slide24

Fiscal and Personal Health

A Lifelong Network of Professional and Personal Friends

Develops Life Skills That Can be Passed on to Family and Community

Celebrate Education

Slide25

Matunda ya

kwanzaa

!

Slide26

26

Slide27

Slide28