THE ROAD AHEAD
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THE ROAD AHEAD

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THE ROAD AHEAD




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Slide1

THE ROAD AHEAD

Navigating College Admission Tests

Slide2

Times Have Changed?

New York Times

, “High School Seniors’ Agony”

. . .

“Competition for college admission has created an unprecedented time of

intense worry.”

Getting into college has never been so competitive.

Standards have shot up. Parents who got into top notch colleges on

medium marks and good overall qualifications cannot understand why their

kids can’t.

. . . Written in 1957!

Slide3

A New Sheriff in Town

“I have a problem with the SAT.”

-David Coleman

President, College Board

Architect of the Common Core Standards

Slide4

The SAT’s evolving mission

1926:

“The SAT is a

psychological

test designed primarily to assess

aptitude

for learning rather than mastery of subjects already learned, and to assess ability

independently of any school curriculum

.”

2005:

The SAT measures verbal and mathematical

reasoning

abilities that students develop over time,

both in and out of school

.

2016:

The SAT must reflect the kinds of meaningful, engaging,

rigorous work that students must undertake in the best high school courses being taught today

, thereby creating a robust and durable

bond between assessment and instruction

.

Slide5

Early History (1926 – 1959)

1926:

First SAT (8,000 students)

1937:

First Achievement Tests (2,000 students)

1946:

First SAT prep

class

1959:

First PSAT

1959:

First ACT

(to measure academic preparation; “achievement not aptitude”)

Slide6

Middle History (1960 – 1994)

1961:

800K SATs (42%) and 300K ACTs (16%)

1968:

UCs require the SAT

1971:

National Merit Scholarship begins

1989:

1.2m SATs and 1m ACTs

1993:

SAT drops “Aptitude” from its name

Slide7

Recent History (1995 – 2010)

1995:

SAT scores are re-centered

2001:

UCs consider dropping the “esoteric” SAT

2005:

A “New” SAT debuts (2400 points)

2007:

Harvey Mudd accepts ACT (now ALL colleges accept both)

2010:

1.57m ACTs and 1.55m SATs

Slide8

The Latest News (2013 – 2016)

2012:

David Coleman (Common Core) becomes College Board president

2013:

Re-designed SAT announced

2014:

Pilot testing of vertically aligned testing systems (SBAC, PARCC)

2015:

New PSAT debuts

2016:

New SAT debuts (March)

Slide9

Major Goals of the New SAT

More

Focused

More

In-depth

More

Relevant

More

Transparent

Slide10

Philosophical Shifts of the New SAT

Shares many of the

Common Core

guiding ethics

Adopts many of

ACT’s

characteristics

Now more than ever, tests

achievement

over aptitude

Slide11

Alignment? Or Tail Wagging the Dog?

Slide12

Highlight Changes of the New SAT

Returns to the 1600-point scale

Guessing penalty eliminated

Shorter (but not really)

Calculator and non-calculator sections

Essay is optional

Command of Evidence is emphasized

Text-heavy; reading-centric

Source Material; non-fiction emphasis

Slide13

Scoring the Redesigned SAT

Slide14

Holistic Review (but some things matter more)

Standardized test scores

Teacher and counselor recommendations

Class rank

Student’s demonstrated interest

Extracurricular activities

Strength of

curriculum

Grades in all courses

90%

87%

87%

59%

58%

50%

46%

49%

34%

AP/IB scores

Grades in college prep courses

94%

Essay or writing sample

Slide15

Mixed Messages

Alumni magazine, August

2014:

Selectivity on the rise…record-low 21% of applicants received the coveted

thick envelopes

…2000 more applications than prior year…from more diverse backgrounds…

---and---

…the students are also SMARTER, with a mean SAT score 18 points higher than last year

s crop

Slide16

Application Bubble

Slide17

Higher GPA = Less Differentiation

Percent of Students

1991

2013

Slide18

Score Distribution: By Design

Slide19

SAT Scoring: Relative Standing

Cumulative Percentiles

SAT COMBINED SCORE

Slide20

1

11 16 21 26 31 36

What Does My Score Mean?

50

th

percentile

80

th

percentile

95

th

percentile

99.9

th

percentile

ACT

Slide21

Pathways to College Admission

SAT only or ACT only (2,000+ schools)SAT or ACT, plus Subject Tests (~ 10-40 schools)Test Optional/Flexible (~ 50 schools) [p. 4-6]

Page 3

Slide22

Standardized Test Checklist

New PSAT

Old SAT

vs.

New SAT vs. ACT

Subject Tests

Timelines

& Preparation

Repeat Testing & Score Choice

Slide23

Strategic Planning

Evaluate pros and cons of the

three

options

Seek out diagnostic test opportunities, especially ACT

Don’t overlook Subject Tests

Follow best practices around timing and formal preparation

Slide24

PSAT Structure: 2014 vs. 2015

2014

2015

Scoring

20 to 80 (x 3)

160 to 760 (x 2)

Time

2 hours 10 minutes

2 hours 45 minutes

Items

125

138

Reading

48 items | 50 min

47 items | 60 min

Writing

39 items | 30 min

44 items | 35 min

Mathematics

38 items | 50 min

47 items | 70 min

Wrong Answers

¼ point deduction

No deduction

Slide25

Vertical Alignment of Scales

Slide26

PSAT Results – Sample Class

Score Change Sophomore to Junior

240

120

200

160

Sophomore PSAT

Junior PSAT

Slide27

National Merit and the PSAT

Slide28

New Tests, New Timelines

Slide29

Three choices (two are compromised)

“Old” SAT

Discontinued as of Jan 2016

Accelerated timeline is inappropriate for most

“New” SAT

P

ractice tests limited and in “beta” form

Predicted scores highly speculative

Scores delayed until late spring 2016

Current ACT

Deep bank of practice tests available

Prep materials and offerings are well-established

All test dates available with prompt reporting of scores

Slide30

Traditional Testing Sequence

1. October of 11th grade PSAT (NMSQT)2. March (or May) of 11th grade SAT or Feb (or April) of 11th grade ACT3. May or June of 11th grade Subject Tests 4. Fall of 12th grade Re-test as necessary

Page 8-9

Slide31

Class of 2017’s Likely Testing Sequence

1. October of 11th grade New PSAT (NMSQT)March (or May) of 11th grade SAT Feb (or April) of 11th grade ACT ✔3. May or June of 11th grade Subject Tests 4. Fall of 12th grade Re-test as necessary (ACT, SAT)

Page 8-9

Slide32

ACT, SAT, Or Both?

Slide33

ACT, SAT, Or Both?

Since it

s a choice you can make, it has the feeling of being

a significant choice, fraught with implication, but I don

t

think it does matter. Either test is fine with us, and we don

t

have a feeling that either favors students with any particular

profile.

Marilyn McGrath-Lewis,

Director of Admission at Harvard College

Slide34

Rise of the ACT Nationally

2013

SAT Takers1.7 MillionACT Takers1.8 Million

Number of students taking the ACT has increased by 30% since 2008

Slide35

Rise of the ACT in California

ACT has grown 126% in California* over last decadeIn 2013 in CA there were still more SAT-takers, but the gap is closing fastNumber of students scoring 32-36 on ACT has increased by 70% since 2010 * HS graduates are up 9%

Slide36

Rise of the ACT at Compass (SF & LA)

Slide37

MATH

MATH

MATH

EXPERIMENTAL

ESSAY

Similar length, different rhythm and pace

Slide38

ACT Reading: Finding the Low Hanging Fruit

Structure:40 questions in 35 minutes4 passages: Fiction, Social Science, Humanities, Natural Science10 questions per passagePacing Concerns:Average of 8 minutes and 4nds per passageDifficulty level of questions within passages is random3rd & 4th passages tend to be more difficult than 1st & 2nd Questions only contain line references about 50% of the time

Questions 1-1084%(no students left any of these questions blank)

Questions 11-2090%(no students left any of these questions blank)

Questions 21-3069%(on average, 8% of students left each of these questions blank)

Questions 31-40

43%

(on average, 14% of students left each of these questions blank)

Slide39

ACT Science: Data Analysis

Structure40 questions in 35 minutes6-7 passages: Data Representation, Research Summary, Conflicting Hypotheses5-7 questions per passageContains little to no Science content; focuses on methodology and data analysisPacing ConcernsAverage of 5-6 minutes per passage, to both read and answerDifficulty ascends from passage to passage and on questions within passagesSome passages will likely be harder than others, thus requiring more timeQuestions almost always refer to specific components of the passage

Average percentage of students who skipped any given question in…

Passage 1:1%

Passage 2:1%

Passage 7:11%

Passage 6: 8%

Passage 4:2%

Passage 3:1%

Passage 5:

5%

Slide40

Concordance Table: Current SAT – ACT

ACTCompositeSATCR+M+W363534333231302928272625242323902330225021802120206020001940188018201770171016501590

Slide41

Current SAT: “Aptitude” Math

17. Four distinct lines lie in a plane, and exactly two of them are parallel. Which of the following could be the number of points where at least two of the lines intersect? I. Three II. Four III. Five(A) I only(B) III only(C) I and III only(D) I, II, and III (E) It cannot be determined from the information given.

Slide42

Which of the following is an equation of a circle with its center at (3,4) and tangent to the x-axis in the standard (x,y) coordinate plane?(x - 3)2 + (y - 4)2 = 16(x - 4)2 + (y - 3)2 = 16(x - 4)2 + (y - 3)2 = 9(x - 3)2 + (y - 4)2 = 9(x + 4)2 + (y + 3)2 = 16

(3,4)

ACT: “Achievement” Math

(x-h)

2

+ (y-k)

2

= r

2

Center: (h, k)

4

Slide43

Thematic Features of the New SAT

Math

An international bank issues its Traveler credit cards worldwide. When a customer makes a purchase using a Traveler card in a currency different from the customer’s home currency, the bank converts the purchase price at the daily foreign exchange rate and then charges a 4% fee on the converted cost.Sara lives in the United States, but is on vacation in India. She used her Traveler card for a purchase that cost 602 rupees (Indian currency). The bank posted a charge of $9.88 to her account that included the 4% fee.PART 1What foreign exchange rate, in Indian rupees per one U.S. dollar, did the bank use for Sara’s charge? Round your answer to the nearest whole number.PART 2A bank in India sells a prepaid credit card worth 7,500 rupees. Sara can buy the prepaid card using dollars at the daily exchange rate with no fee, but she will lose any money left unspent on the prepaid card. What is the least number of the 7,500 rupees on the prepaid card Sara must spend for the prepaid card to be cheaper than charging all her purchases on the Traveler card? Round your answer to the nearest whole number of rupees.

Contains both

Calculator and Non-Calculator

sections

Focuses more heavily on

Algebra and Data Analysis

, with some attention to

Trigonometry

Involves real world applications of concepts, including a

progression of problems

building off of a given scenario

Slide44

Thematic Features of the New SAT

Vocabulary

“The nature of impeachment: a narrowly channeled exception to the separation of powers maxim. The Federal Convention of 1787 said that.”3. As used in line 37, “channeled” most nearly means worn. sent. constrained. siphoned.

Focuses on

Tier 2

words

Exploits words with

multiple meanings

Challenges students to

derive meaning from the context

in which words are used

Slide45

Thematic Features of the New SAT

Text & Data

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasts steady job growth in this field, ⁶projecting that 16 percent of new jobs in all occupations will be related to urban and regional planning. 6. Which choice completes the sentence with accurate data based on the graph? NO CHANGE warning, however, that job growth in urban and regional planning will slow to 14 percent by 2020. predicting that employment of urban and regional planners will increase 16 percent between 2010 and 2020. indicating that 14 to 18 percent of urban and regional planning positions will remain unfilled.

Permeates all sections of the testRequires students to analyze and extrapolate from data represented graphically in multiple contextsAsks students to identify and correct inconsistencies between data and text

Slide46

Thematic Features of the New SAT

Citing Evidence

4. In lines 49-54 (“Prosecutions … sense”), what is the most likely reason Jordan draws a distinction between two types of “parties”?A) To counter the suggestion that impeachment is or should be about partisan politics5. Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the previous question? Lines 13-17 (“It…office”) Lines 20-24 (“The division…astute”) Lines 55-58 (“The drawing…misdemeanors”) Lines 65-68 (“Congress…transportation”)

Spans

all sections

of the test, including Math

Requires students to

support

their answer choices

Challenges students to explain

how an author uses evidence

to craft an argument

Slide47

Thematic Features of the New SAT

Grammar

During his career, Kingman exhibited his work ⁷ internationally. He garnered much acclaim. In 1936, a critic described one of Kingman’s solo exhibits as “twenty of the freshest, most satisfying water colors that have been seen hereabouts in many a day.”7. Which choice most effectively combines the sentences at the underlined portion? internationally, and Kingman also garnered internationally; from exhibiting, he garnered internationally but garnered internationally, garnering

Requires students to

revise extended prose

to more accurately express an author’s intent

Addresses a wider range of punctuation

Tests

frequently confused words

such as

allusion/illusion

Slide48

Current SAT Essay: (through January 2016)

First Section. 25 minutes. Required.

Ex: “

Can people choose to be happy?

P

ersonal experience ok

Thesis can be only tangentially related to topic

Graded holistically, rewards style

Widely criticized

Held in low regard by colleges

Slide49

Current ACT Essay: (through June 2015)

Last section. 30 minutes

.

O

ptional*

Ex: “

Should students have to wear uniforms?

Graded on persuasiveness of argument

Creativity and style not necessarily rewarded

Held in low regard by colleges

Slide50

New ACT Essay: (as of September 2015)

Expected to increase to 40 minutes

Will require evaluation of three different perspectives on a topic, e.g.

artificial intelligence

Students must not only present their own perspective but also analyze the perspectives given

Essays receiving high scores will “

effectively employ rhetorical strategies

Slide51

Thematic Features of the New SAT

Essay

As you read the passage below, consider how Paul Bogard usesevidence, such as facts or examples, to support claims.reasoning to develop ideas and to connect claims and evidence.stylistic or persuasive elements, such as word choice or appeals to emotion, to add power to the ideas expressed.[650-750 word Source Text will appear here]Write an essay in which you explain how Paul Bogard builds an argument to persuade his audience that natural darkness should be preserved. In your essay, analyze how Bogard uses one or more of the features listed in the box above (or features of your own choice) to strengthen the logic and persuasiveness of his argument. Be sure that your analysis focuses on the most relevant features of the passage. Your essay should not explain whether you agree with Bogard’s claims, but rather explain how Bogard builds an argument to persuade his audience.

Is based on a common promptMeasures students’ ability to explain how an author crafts an argumentRates students on strength of analysis and coherence of writing

Slide52

SAT Subject Tests

Designed to demonstrate academic achievement in

specific subject areas

Scored on 200-800 scale

1 hour each, can take up to 3 subjects in one sitting

Plan ahead to maximize scores

Recommended? Required? How many? Which ones?

Slide53

Subject Test Policies

UC system no longer requires Subject Test scores but will consider them if submitted

No longer any college requiring

3 Subject Tests

Georgetown

still

recommends

3

~30 colleges officially require 2

Many colleges

recommend

2

Detailed list at www.subject-tests.com

Slide54

SAT Subject Test Options

Literature

U.S.

History

or World

History

Math Level 2

or

Math

Level

1

Biology (E/M), Chemistry, and Physics

Languages: French, Chinese, German, Spanish, Modern Hebrew, Italian, Japanese, Korean, and Latin

Slide55

Test Structure (One Hour)

Test

Number of Questions

Literature

60

U.S. History

90-95

Math 1 & 2

50

Biology E/M

80

Chemistry

85

Spanish

85

Slide56

Test Scoring: US History

Raw score

Scaled score

81 - 90

800

70

740

60

680

55

650

50

620

45

590

40

560

35

530

30

510

Slide57

REPEAT TESTING

Slide58

Multiple Scores

Public

Private

Super

s

core

52%

61%

Best Sitting

41%

25%

Most Recent Sitting

2%

5%

Average of All Scores

1%

1%

No Response

4%

7%

Slide59

Questions Remain

Colleges’ reactions and policy changes

Essay (UC’s will require it)

Score Choice

super

-scoring

Concordance with old SAT scores and with ACT

scores

More changes in the future:

Subject Tests, ACT

Slide60

Score Choice – Varying Policies

Harvard

We allow Score Choice

“The application is yours. We’ll review what you send us.”

Georgetown

We don’t allow Score Choice under any conditions or combinations

And we require

three

Subject Tests (yep, just us)

Stanford

You can’t use Score Choice for SAT or ACT;

all

of

both

must be sent

Score Choice

is

allowed for Subject Tests, because they’re optional*

Yale

Choose either a) SAT + ST’s or b) ACT alone, then send

all

of

either

If you choose to send ST’s with ACT, then you must send all SAT’s too

Slide61

SUPERSCORING

March

SATCritical Reading600Math 650Writing550Combined1800

October SATReading650Math 600Writing600Combined1850

Superscored SATReadingMath WritingCombined

650

650

600

1900

Slide62

The Big Takeaways

Focus on reading now

Consider Subject Test(s) and/or AP(s) sophomore spring

Take diagnostic test(s) early summer after sophomore year

Decide when and how you will prepare

Maintain perspective

Slide63

A REALITY CHECK

Slide64

A REALITY CHECK

Slide65

A REALITY CHECK

Slide66

A REALITY CHECK

Slide67

A REALITY CHECK

Slide68

A REALITY CHECK

Slide69

Q & A…

Southern California226 South Beverly DriveSuite 200Beverly Hills, CA 90212(800) 925-1250Northern California700 Larkspur Landing Circle Suite 235Larkspur, CA 94939(415) 464-8600

Slide70

Access to Practice Test Opportunities

Connect with Compass to find dates & locations, reserve a seat, or receive guidance:Complete tear-off card and return to me Visit po.st/compass and complete quick-formCall 415-464-8600

Page 48-49

Slide71

Subject Tests make sense for high scorers . . .

Math Level 2 Subject Test Takers in California2009All Scorers700-800 Scorers~ 67,000 ~ 13,0002013All Scorers700-800 Scorers~ 35,000~ 13,000

Most schools that look for students in the 500-650 range don’t require or use Subject Tests

Slide72

But these advantages come at a price: the Internet appears to be chipping away at my capacity for concentration and contemplation. My mind now expects to take in information the way the Internet distributes it, in a swiftly moving stream of particles. Once I was a scuba diver in the sea of words. Now I zip along the surface like a person on water skis.

11

12

The figure of speech in lines 11-12 (“Now...skis”) serves primarily to

(A) emphasize the speed of the Internet(B) underscore the vastness of the Internet(C) convey the sense of control that the author feels(D) suggest the cursory nature of the author’s thinking process(E) highlight the author’s fascination with high-speed activities

49%

37%

attractor

READING COMPREHENSION EXAMPLE

Slide73

SCORE CHOICE POLICIES

SAT

You can select which dates to send, but you cannot send

sub-scores (CR, M, or

Wr

) only

Most private colleges combine sub-scores from multiple sittings, while most public colleges do not

ACT

Same as SAT, except there are few colleges who officially combine sub-scores from multiple sittings

Subject Tests

You select which individual scores to send

Slide74

Subject Test Takers, by the numbers:

USA

California

2009

1.53 million SATs

207,000 SATs

295,000 STs ( ~ 20%)

107,000 STs ( ~ 50%)

2012:

UCs dropped their ST requirement

2013

1.66 million SATs

234,000 SATs

251,000 STs ( ~ 15%)

56,000 STs ( ~ 20%)