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Trafficking in Persons Trafficking in Persons

Trafficking in Persons - PowerPoint Presentation

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Trafficking in Persons - PPT Presentation

APT Act to Prevent Trafficking wwwaptirelandorg facebook APTacttopreventtrafficking The trade in and exploitation of human beings by criminals to make money Human Trafficking threatens women men amp children ID: 424806

human trafficking persons www trafficking human www persons women trafficked ireland http exploitation org europe prostitution life sexual person day year international

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Slide1

Trafficking in Persons

APT – Act to Prevent Traffickingwww.aptireland.org

facebook/

APTacttopreventtraffickingSlide2

The trade in

and exploitation ofhuman beings

by criminals

to make money.

Human Trafficking threatens women, men & children

What is trafficking in Persons?Slide3

"Throughout our evolutionary story the universe constantly generates new life.

Anything which degrades that life violates the sacredness of all life".Slide4

APT – Act to Prevent Trafficking

www.aptireland.org“Human trafficking is an open wound on the body of contemporary society,

a scourge upon the body of Christ. It is a crime against humanity.” Pope Francis 2013Slide5

Forced labour

Sale of human organs

Sexual exploitation

People are bought and sold as commodities

Different forms of human traffickingSlide6

Smuggling of migrants and human trafficking both involve moving human persons for profit

Smuggled persons are left to their own devices on arrivalTrafficked persons are under the control of others

Smuggling Vs TraffickingSlide7

PUSH1. Poverty

2. Inequality

3. Violence

4. Prior sexual exploitation

5. Lack of awareness about this crime

Roots of trafficking

PULL

1. Job

opportunities

2. Promise of freedom/independence

3. Chance of a better quality of lifeSlide8
Slide9

Human Trafficking is one of the top 3 most profitable illegal trades

Fastest growing illegal trade 27 million people per year globally100$ billion per year globally – more than Google, Nike and Starbucks combined

Ireland has been identified as a source, transit and destination country for trafficking.

Key FactsSlide10

Particularly vulnerable are:

Women and childrenPeople lacking money/opportunities

People wishing to improve their lives, from all backgrounds, races, and classes

Unskilled labourersUndocumented migrants

Oppressed ethnic/cultural groups

Who is trafficked?Slide11

A trafficker has many faces –

Male and female

Members of organised gangs

Boyfriends Family and friends

Who are the traffickers?Slide12

Traffickers recruit through –

Fake

job adverts – care work, modeling,

dancing

, hotel/bar work/study/travel

Casual

acquaintance/

‘friends’

Grooming

– often online

How are persons trafficked?Slide13

Extracts from profiles

LydiaFrom Poland, was chaperoned daily to a brothel in Italy and her movements were controlled. When she returned each day, her trafficker raped her in the apartment. She was subsequently brought to Ireland and forced into prostitution.

Julia

Aged 17, was given clothes and boots and a bag of condoms and told to do anything that clients wanted. Forced to have sex with a minimum of four men per night.

Kiky

From Nigeria, was held in total captivity in a house in Ireland for two years. Slide14

Violence

– rape and beatings force them to complyThreats/blackmail

– against their families back home

Debt servitude – held in bondage and responsible to trafficker

Why don

t trafficked persons escape?Slide15

Some statistics…

75% of all trafficking victims globally are women and girls

76% of victims in Europe are trafficked for

sexual

exploitation (this figure is roughly the same for Ireland)

Up

to 97% of women in indoor prostitution in Ireland

are

migrant women (3-13% are Irish)

There

are at least 1,000 women (and girls) in indoor

prostitution at any one time in Ireland. Slide16

Lack of trust/Anger/Fear

Insecurity/ConfusionShame/Guilt

Depression/Helplessness

Post-traumatic stress disorder – e.g. flashbacks

Effects on trafficked personsSlide17

Trafficking

– Is the most shocking form of

human rights abuse and modern

day slavery Is

happening now, here, there,

and

wherever

you are

It

could happen to someone

you

know

Why should we care?Slide18

Trafficking Worldwide

Approximately 27 million per yearSlide19

1. The

Palermo Protocoland

2. The

Council of Europe Convention

International Legislation

to combat traffickingSlide20

ACTION ‘the recruitment, transportation, transfer, harbouring or receipt of persons’

MEANS ‘threat or use of force or other forms of coercion, of abduction, of fraud, of deception, of the abuse of power, or of giving or receiving payments or benefits to achieve the consent of a person having control over another person’PURPOSE

Exploitation – including prostitution or other forms of sexual exploitation

UN Palermo Protocol, 2000Slide21

A 'reflection period' of at least 30 days

S

afe

and secure housing

P

sychological

and emergency medical assistance

I

nformation

in a language the trafficked person can understand

R

enewable

residence permits to trafficked persons

C

ompensation

for the abuses

suffered

Council of Europe

Convention on Action Against Trafficking in Human Beings 2005 Slide22

The Criminal Law (Human Trafficking) Act

2008

PREVENT

Trafficking - PROSECUTE

Traffickers

-

PROTECT Victims

It is a criminal offence

to solicit or importune, in any place, for the purpose of prostitution, a person whom one knows to have been trafficked.

The victim is

allowed 60 days of

recovery.

Administrative procedures in place for protection of

victim.

Anti-Human Trafficking Unit

(AHTU) models

best practice for protection of victim.

http

://

www.justice.ie

Ireland:

current legal stanceSlide23

WHAT

CAN WE

DO?

Trafficking in PersonsSlide24

Become informed of human trafficking

Report any suspicious events, happenings in your local area to local police

Encourage people to talk to each other about this modern day slavery

Promote non violence in all situations

Respect the dignity of each person

Organise a speaker to your relevant groups

Promote fair trade and check retailers supply chain

WHAT CAN WE DO?Slide25

Websites

http://www.aptireland.org

http://www.ruhama.ie

http://

www.blueblindfold.gov.ie

http://www.immigrantcouncil.ie

http://

www.turnofftheredlight.ie

http://www.tirzah.ie

International Organisations

http://

www.coatnet.org

- Christian Organisations Against Trafficking in Human Beings

http://

www.antislavery.org

- Anti Slavery International

http://

www.gaatw.net

- Global Alliance Against Traffic in Women (GAATW)

http://

www.catinternational.org

- The Coalition Against Trafficking in Women (CATW) International

http://www.renate-europe.net

-

Religious in Europe Networking Against Trafficking and Exploitation

List of ResourcesSlide26