old window  x  boards both equal to the length of the window plus the width of the saw blade usually    x  boards both equal to the width of the wi ndow minus  plus the width of the saw blade usuall
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old window x boards both equal to the length of the window plus the width of the saw blade usually x boards both equal to the width of the wi ndow minus plus the width of the saw blade usuall

This will make your job much easier wood screws hammer and finishing nails 2 hinges they should be the thinner kind no wider than 1 paint stripper and scraper drop cloths sandpaper wood stain I used minwax sealant to go over the stain saw to cut wo

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old window x boards both equal to the length of the window plus the width of the saw blade usually x boards both equal to the width of the wi ndow minus plus the width of the saw blade usuall




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Presentation on theme: "old window x boards both equal to the length of the window plus the width of the saw blade usually x boards both equal to the width of the wi ndow minus plus the width of the saw blade usuall"— Presentation transcript:


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1 old window 2 1”x 4” boards, both equal to the length of the window (plus the width of the saw blade, usually 1/8”) 2 1” x 4” boards, both equal to the width of the wi ndow, minus 2” (plus the width of the saw blade, usually 1/8”) 1 piece of plywood, dimensions equal to that of the window 4 15” table legs (you can salvage these from any old coffee table, and you can even buy them at big box home improvement store) ma ke sure the legs have the screw sticking out of the base. This will make your job much easier. wood screws hammer and finishing nails 2 hinges (they should be

the thinner kind, no wider than 1”) paint stripper and scraper drop cloths sandpaper wood stain ( I used minwax) sealant (to go over the stain) saw, to cut wood (if you’re unwilling to do this, most big box stores can cut your wood for you) sand paper drill and full drill bit kit safety glasses and mask 1. Clean window with soap and water . Let dry. Once the window is completely dry, apply the paint stripper according to the package directions and strip off the paint. Make sure to wear rubber gloves and a mask while applying the stripper. That stuff is nasty. Use a putty knife or paint scra

per to remove the old paint. 2. Once all the paint is removed, wash the windows again to get rid of any residue leftover from the stripper. 3. Cut the wood, if you haven’t already. Make sure to wear your safety glasses and closed toed shoes when cutting. Aft er cutting the wood, sand everything down until it’s smooth. (continued on next page)
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4. Drill the pilot holes for the boards, ” in and 1 ” from the top and bottom, like so: When drilling the holes, make sure you use a drill bit that is slightly small er than the screws you’re using. For example, if you’re using 1/4 ”

screws, make sure your bit is one size smaller than that. Otherwise the screws will go right through the holes but they won’t have anything to cling to. (continued on next page)
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4. rill the woodscrews into the boards to attach them to one another. When you’re done, you should h ave a frame that l ooks like this: 5. Lay the frame on the ground or on the workbench. Then lay the piece of plywood on top of the frame . Attach the plywood to the frame using finishing nails. Space out the nails every 2” or so. A nice nail gun can make quick work of this task.
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6.

Attach the legs. Figure out the size of the screw attached to the base of the leg, and select the drill bit that is a size smalle r than that. Measure 2” or 3” diagonally in from each corner, and mark where you are placing your legs. 7. Drill a hole for each leg using the proper drill bit. Attach the leg simply by twisting it into the hole you made with a drill bit. If you make a mi stake, simply use a different bit and drill a different hole about 1” further in, but make sure you do the same with all of the other holes. By the time you are done with this step, the legs should be firmly

attached to the base of the table. (conti nued on next page)
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8. Dust off the table and the window and make sure there are no particles sticking to it. 9. Apply the stain using a clean, soft, white cloth. Wipe in the direction of the grain. Do not go over the same area twice, or you’ll en d up with dark patches. Try to apply it in a single layer of uniform thickness and texture. Wear gloves to avoid staining your hands. 10. Allow the stain to dry for 24 hours. 11. Apply the top coat/glaze (if using), and allow to dry for 24 hours. 12. Measure and m ark the spots on the table

frame and the window frame for the hinges. Drill your pilot holes (again, use a drill bit that’s slightly smaller than the screws). 13. Attach one side of the hinges to the window, and then to the table. Make sure they are facing in the correct direction! (continued on next page)
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14. Now you have a lovely window box table where you can store coffee table books, remotes, mementos, or anything you want. Wasn’t that easy?