“Those Winter Sundays” - PowerPoint Presentation

“Those Winter Sundays”
“Those Winter Sundays”

“Those Winter Sundays” - Description


Poetry Analysis Mrs Kate Hendrix PreAP English II Madison Central High School The Title of the Poem Think about what the title Those Winter Sundays means to you On your paper write 23 sentences describing a typical winter Sunday at your house ID: 510022 Download Presentation

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Slide1

“Those Winter Sundays”

Poetry Analysis

Mrs. Kate Hendrix

Pre-AP English II

Madison Central High SchoolSlide2

The Title of the Poem

Think about what the title “Those Winter Sundays” means to you.

On your paper, write 2-3 sentences describing a typical “winter Sunday” at your house.

What do you think this poem might be about?

Throughout the day all of you will be reading various responses aloud! Be prepared!Slide3

Read the Poem

As you read, keep in mind the speaker’s attitude toward his father.Slide4

Read Literally

Put a slash mark (/) at the end of each SENTENCE.

Beside the poem, write a paraphrase of each sentence in the poem.Slide5

SOAPStone

SOAPStone

is an acronym to remind you to ask yourself several questions about a poem to establish some background for understanding.

S = subject of the poem. What is the poem about?

O = occasion. What is the time and place of the poem and what might have prompted the poet to write it?

A = audience. To whom is the poet writing?

P = purpose. What is the poet’s purpose? Is it to express emotion, or tell a story, or convince someone (the audience) something?

S = speaker. What do you know about the speaker, based on what is in the poem?

Tone = tone. How would you initially describe the speaker’s tone based on the SOAPS?Slide6

SOAPStone

With a partner, complete the

SOAPStone

analysis on each of your papers (10 minutes)

S ________________________________________

O

________________________________________

A ________________________________________

P

________________________________________

S

________________________________________

Tone _____________________________________Slide7

Levels of Questions

Level 1

: Questions for which the answer can be found in the text itself (

on the line

)

Write a Level 1 question for each of the 5 sentences in the poem.

Answer your own questions, using textual evidence (QUOTES!) to support them.

Ex. Sentence 1 – Level 1 question and answer:

Question: What days did the speaker’s father get up to make a fire?

Answer: Every day, “Sundays too”Slide8

Levels of Questions

Level 2

: Questions for which the reader must make inferences based on the text (

between the lines

)

Write a Level 2 question for each of the 5 sentences in the poem.

Answer your own questions, using textual evidence to support them.

Ex. Sentence 1 – Level 2

Question: What kind of man was the speaker’s father?

Answer: He was hardworking, with “hands that ached from labor in the weekday weather,” and he took care of his family even on “Sundays…made banked fires blaze.”Slide9

Levels of Questions

Level 3

: Questions which move outside the text to larger questions that are universal (

beyond the lines

)

For the poem as a whole, write a level 3 question and answer it using textual evidence to support it.Slide10

Levels of Questioning

In 1-2 sentences, explain how asking questions makes you understand the poem better.

You can’t say that it doesn’t help you…it SHOULD help you. If it doesn’t help you, you’re not working hard enough!Slide11

Devices Linked to Meaning

Complete the chart that I will hand out to you.

Comment on at least two examples each of diction, imagery, and details

The rest of the rows may be completed with whichever of those three literary elements you choose

Basically, you can’t just do all imagery, for example

You may work with a partner, but both partners must complete the chart in full!

Label your chart with your name then indicate your partner’s name on the line where it asks for your partner’s name. Slide12

Shifts

When trying to understand and analyze a speaker’s tone, it is always important to look for complexity in that tone.

In other words,

a speaker in a poem rarely feels only one way about the subject

, so look for

shifts

or changes in the poem.

Those shifts can be revealed by changes in verb tense, point-of-view, diction choices, or images.

When identifying a speaker’s tone, use more than one adjective to describe it.

If you need help thinking of good words, use that TONE chart I gave you at the beginning of the year!Slide13

Shifts

In this poem, does the speaker’s attitude toward his father seem to be the same throughout the poem? If not, where does the shift in attitude occur? Explain.

What adjective would you use to describe the speaker’s tone before the shift?

Provide textual evidence to support that assertion.

What adjective would you use to describe the speaker’s tone after the shift?

Provide textual evidence to support that assertion.Slide14

Writing Assignment

After reading and analyzing the poem, write a paragraph in which you explain how the poet’s use of diction, imagery, and details reveals the speaker’s complex attitude toward his father.

If we run out of time in class, this is homework!

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