VIGOUR:LETS GET PHYSICAL!

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Presentations text content in VIGOUR:LETS GET PHYSICAL!

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VIGOUR:LETS GET PHYSICAL!

Dr. Kate Hefferon, PhD

URBAN WOOT

On the Couch Salons

Blacks Club

Slide2

Vigor

“The sense of possessing physical strength, emotional energy and cognitive liveliness”

(

Shirom

and

Shragra

, 2009, p. 1008).

Slide3

Exercise has been ‘more popularized than popular’ (Berger et al., 1992 as cited in Hays, 1999, p. 7)

Do you exercise…on a regular basis…Why or why not?

Physical activity paradox:

H

alf would regard themselves as “inactive”

(Acevedo, 2012)

Slide4

How do you compare?

Slide5

Definitions

Physical activity is defined as ‘any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that results in energy expenditure’

Slide6

Exercise

is defined as ‘a form of structured physical activity with a specific

objective of improving or maintain physical fitness or health’

Slide7

Recommendations (ACSM)

1) Minimum of 30 (and up to 60) minutes of moderate-intensity exercise 5 days a week (150 minutes or 1000 kcal/week)2) The 30 minutes can be broken down into shorter sessions (3x10 mins) over the course of the day (Accumulation)3) Also, adults can choose to engage in 20-60 minutes of vigorous intensity exercise on three days a week (Garber et al., 2011; Hardman & Stensel, 2009, p. 274)

Cardiorespiratory

exercise

Slide8

Recommendations cont…

Resistance exerciseEach major muscle group on 2-3 days a week, with 2-3 sets (8-12 repetitions), creating increases in power and strengthOlder adults (and previously sedentary) engage in light to very light intensity in 15-20 reps There should be a 48-hour break between sessions

Slide9

Recommendations cont…

Flexibility exerciseIn order to improve range of motion adults are recommended to conduct flexibility exercises (e.g. static, dynamic, ballistic and stretches) on at least 2-3 days a week.Stretches should be held in 10-30 second stints, and repeated 2-4 times (60 second in total per stretch)Neuromotor exerciseAdults should engage in Neuromotor exercise, which engage motor skills (e.g. tai chi and yoga) for 20-30 mins/day, 2-3 days a week

Slide10

First Impressions?

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The truth about exercise

When it comes to exercise ‘some is good; more is better’ (Garber et al., 2011, p. 1338)Greater physiological benefits from higher intensity trainingSitting for long periods of time over the day has been found to be dangerous to our health Although we may reach recommended daily guidelines, this doesn’t negate the detrimental effects of a sedentary work lifestyle (ACSM, 2012)

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The known benefits

IndividualSocietyPhysical and psychological functioningPrevention of mental illness & disease

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Physical benefits

Reduces the risk of developing:ObesityCardiovascular disease Coronary heart diseaseStrokeDiabetes (type 2) OsteoporosisSleep disordersHigh blood pressureIncrease immune system functioning (J-shape relationship) (Hamer, 2012)Certain cancers (Colon, breast; rectal, lung, prostate, endometrial)Premature death (Salonen et al, 1983; Paffenbarger et al. 1986)

Slide14

Psychological benefits

Enhanced positive emotion (Biddle & Mutrie, 2008; Hellmich, 2009; Mayo clinic; as cited in Rath & Harter, 2010; Reed & Buck, 2009; Reed & Ones, 2008)Reduced anxiety (McDonald & Hodgdon, 1991)Reduced depression and stress (Steptoe, Wardle, Pollard, Canaan, & Davies, 1996; Babyak et al., 2000; Hassmen, Koivula, & Uutela, 2000; Kritz-Silverstein, Barrett-Connor, & Corbeau, 2001)Enhanced body image, self-esteem and self-perceptions (Fox, 2000; Moses, Steptoe, Mathews, & Edwards, 1989)Improved general cognitive functioning (children, older adults) (Lautenshlager et al., 2008; Boutcher, 2000; Rejeski & Mihalko, 2001; Rejeski et al., 2001)

Slide15

Why is it so hard?

Slide16

Again….

Slide17

Then and now…

Men and women average +12,500 steps/

day

(Tudor-Locke & Bassett, 2004

)

Majority of today <5000 steps/day

Slide18

Is food to blame?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4N5i-0t8m94

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Does it matter?

Slide20

Urban exercise

V.S.

Slide21

How did it change you?

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Ready For change?

1) Pre-contemplation: This stage represents when an individual is currently not engaged in physical activity and not even contemplating engaging at that point in time or in the near future. At this stage, the cons of engaging in activity far outweigh the pros (decisional balance).2) Contemplation: The individual is not engaging in activity but has contemplated the idea of starting to engage in such behaviours)3) Preparation: The individual has started to engage in small steps to start their behaviour changes (e.g. buying a membership, getting new trainers). The pros of engagement start to balance out the cons. 4) Action: The individual has started to engage in the desired level of activity and continues to do so for up to and les than 6 months)5) Maintenance: The individual continues their exercise regime and meets the criteria for being physically active for more than 6 months. The pros far outweigh the cons within this stage.

WHERE ARE YOU AT?

WHERE ARE

YOU AT?

Slide23

Marshmallows (Mischel, 1970)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6EjJsPylEOY

Slide24

Self-Regulation

Process by which we can seek to have control over thoughts, our feelings and impulses

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When people’s self-regulatory resources have been depleted, the non-optimal inner motivations exert a greater influence on behavior. The stronger the desire, the greater the releasing effect of ego depletion.” e.g. alcohol, restrained eating, prejudices, sexual infidelity, self presentation, etc. (Baumeister, Gailliot, DeWall & Oaten, 2006).

Slide26

What can we do?

Evidence indicates that self-regulation functions like a muscle It gets tired right after use, but over time it can be strengthened

S

pill-over effect

healthy eating

study habits

chores completion

caffeine, alcohol and tobacco consumption

emotional control

budgetary abidance

Slide27

Routine, Routine, Routine

Slide28

Further Suggestions (based on research)

Individualise

your programme

Find a buddy

Declare to the masses

Track tangible and measurable achievements

Be flexible and use accumulation

Make it a lifestyle, not a fad

Slide29

A final note:

There are risks to participation

Myocardial infarction

Musculoskeletal

injury

(plus

dehydration

, hyperthermia and hypothermia, amenorrhea,

anaemia

and suppression of immune

functioning)

Exercise

dependence

Overall

, the risks do not outweigh the benefits of participation for the majority

Slide30

References and Resources

http://www.johnratey.com/newsite/

index.html

http://

www.acsm.org

BBC 2 Horizons- The truth about exercise

Biddle, S. J. H. and Mutrie, N. (2007) Psychology of Physical activity: Determinants, well-being and interventions (2nd ed.):

Routledge

.

Acevedo, E. (2012). The Handbook of Exercise Psychology. Oxford University Press.

Slide31

Thank you!

k.hefferon@uel.ac.uk

www.katehefferon.com

@

katehefferon

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