Figurative
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Figurative

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Figurative




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Presentation on theme: "Figurative"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

Figurative

Language

&

Literary

Devices

Slide2

Figurative language is the use of words that go beyond their ordinary meanings.  Figurative language requires you to use your imagination to figure out the author's meaning. 

The water’s reflection was like the sun on glass.

Slide3

Idioms

SAYINGS! – that mean something other than what they sayExample: “Never look a gift horse in the mouth.”Written in context: Even though the dress I got for Christmas is not my style, my mom taught me to never look a gift horse in the mouth.Explanation: Never criticize a gift, mainly because it is free. In the old days, when you were going to buy a horse, the buyer would check its mouth to see if was healthy before purchasing.

Slide4

Simile

Comparing two

unlike

things using

like

or

as

Examples:

My love is

like

a red, red rose.

She is

as

thin as a toothpick.

Your eyes are

like

sunshine

Slide5

Similes

Example: “Eyes as dark as coal.”Written in context: The young boy’s eyes were as dark as coal.Explanation: A simile compares two unlike things using the words “like” or “as”. In this case a person’s eyes are compared to a piece of black coal, indicating the boy’s eyes are really dark.

Slide6

Famous

similes

“Your love is like a rollercoaster, baby.”

“When I’m gone, I’ll miss you

like a child misses her blanket.”

“I love you like

a fat

kid loves cake.”

Slide7

METAPHOR - A figure of speech comparing two different things without using the words “like” or “as.”

Stars are buttons off the

a

ngels’ gowns.

Slide8

Metaphors

Example: “Mom is a raging bull.”Written in context: My mother became a raging bull, who was racing towards a target, when she realized I had not cleaned my room!Explanation: A metaphor, like a simile, compares two unlike things, but it does not use the words “like” or “as”. In the example above, the mom is a raging bull which is clearly unlikely and impossible. However, it accurately shows the reader how the mother felt.

Slide9

Famous

metaphors

Generally, metaphors use a form of the

verb “to be.” See underlined examples above!

“We’re just two lost souls swimming in a

fish bowl year after year.” –Pink Floyd

You

be the prince and I’ll be the princess. It’s a love story, baby, just say yes.” –Taylor Swift

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=esuQIMr8nNw&feature=related

Slide10

HYPERBOLE - figurative language where exaggeration is used for emphasis

Our teacher is so old she probably taught cavemen how to make a wheel.

Slide11

Hyperboles

Example: “Eating a whole cow.”Written in context: I am so hungry I could eat a whole cow.Explanation: A hyperbole is an exaggeration. No one could really eat a whole cow, no matter how hungry they are. This figurative language is used to show the reader that the person is really hungry. However, it is not meant to be taken literally.

Slide12

Hyperbole

Hyperbole is an exaggeration or overstatement.

Like

other figurative language, hyperbole is used to createa certain image or idea, and is not meant to be takenliterally.

“Strong as 10 regular men, definitely.” –Aladdin

“You know I’d walk 1,000 miles if I could just see you tonight.” –Vanessa Carlton

“I’m the type of guy that’ll take you out and

buy that rock that’ll break your arm.”

-Jagged Edge

Slide13

Personification - giving human characteristics to things that are not human

The moonlight walked across the water.

Slide14

Personification

Example: “Wind whistling.”Written in context: The wind whistled through the empty forest.Explanation: A personification gives human qualities to a non-human thing. In the sentence above, the wind, a non-living thing is said to be whistling. However, the wind does not have lips like a person in order to whistle.

Slide15

Personification

Obviously, we know brooks don’t laugh. However, by

personifying the brooks, the author allows the reader to

imagine the sound of the running water flowing in the brook.

Have you ever noticed what cheerful things brooks are? They’re always laughing. Even in winter-time I’ve heard them under the ice.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RKexdSZNiLc&feature=related

Slide16

Alliteration - figurative language using the repetition of sounds at the beginning of words

C

op

C

urt

w

rote

W

anda the

W

itch a speeding ticket. She was

f

lying and

f

lipping over the

f

i

f

ty-

f

ive mile an hour limit.

Slide17

Alliteration

Alliteration is the repetition of the same consonant sound or letter at the beginning of each or most of the words in a phrase.

Examples:

Sally sells seashells by the seashore.

Peter piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.

Cute cuddly monkeys

Slide18

Alliteration

Example: “Nodded, nearly, napping.”Written in context: “While I nodded, nearly, napping, suddenly there came a tapping…” The Raven By Edgar Allan Poe.Explanation: Alliteration is the repetition of the first consonant sound in more than two consecutive words. It is used to create a feeling or a mood. Some other authors use it as humor, such as tongue twister. (Peter Piper picked a peck of pickled peppers.)

Slide19

Assonance

The repetition of a vowel sound in non-rhyming words. “Breakin’ rocks in the hot sun, I fought the law and the law won” “I hear you calling out my nameAll of the elements will fadeNever before has love looked safeNever again will it look the sameBut then we fall back now to this empty houseThere the wars will rage “ (Cartel)

Slide20

Consonance

The

repetition

of

consonant

sounds

within

and at the

end

of words.

“At night they would go walk

ing

‘til the break

ing

of the day,

The morn

ing

is for sleep

ing

Through the dark streets they go search

ing

to seek God in their own way,

Save the nighttime for your weep

ing

… “ (Coldplay)

Slide21

Repetition

The repetition of a specific word or phrase

adds emphasis to the author’s tone or meaning of the story.

“the noise steadily increased” is repeated several times towards the end of the story

Slide22

Onomatopoeia - a word or words that imitate a sound

The click, click, click of the computer keys gave Mrs. Jones a headache.

Slide23

Onomatopoeia

Example: “SPLAT!”Written in context: As the boy tripped over the rock, all that was heard was the “SPLAT!” of the ice cream scoop hitting the ground.Explanation: Onomatopoeia is the imitation of sound to send the reader a clearer picture of what happened. It helps writing by adding one of the five senses, hearing. (Other examples: Hiss, crack, tick-tock, buzz, slam, etc…)

Slide24

Oxymoron

Example: “Pretty ugly”Written in context: Even though everyone thought the black duckling was pretty ugly, he turned out to be a beautiful swan.Explanation: An oxymoron is a contradiction in a sentence. The contradiction in this sentence is pretty and ugly. They mean the complete opposite and therefore it is an oxymoron. Usually, something is either pretty or ugly, but not both.

Slide25

Pun

Example: “Wooden Shoe”Written in context: I would like to go to Holland someday. Wooden shoe?Explanation: A pun is a play on words. In the example above “Wooden Shoe” is replacing the words “wouldn’t you”. Since wooden shoes are an important icon from Holland it adds humor and ties the whole statement together.

Slide26

Imagery

Use of descriptive words that appeal to the senses (

smell, sight, sound, touch, taste

).

Examples

:

The

lake was left shivering by the touch of morning

wind.

Her

face blossomed when she caught a

glimpse of

him.

The eerie silence was shattered by her

piercing scream

.

Slide27

Understatement

Statement that deliberately represents something as much less in magnitude or importance than it really is. (opposite of hyperbole)"Ladies and Gentlemen, this is your Captain speaking. We have a small problem. All four engines have stopped. We are doing our best to get them going again. I trust you are not in too much distress."

Slide28

Allusion

An allusion is a reference to another work, event, or person in a piece of literature (or history) for effectThe championship game is a real match of David vs. Goliath

Slide29

Synecdoche

A

part is used to represent the whole

(as

hand

for

sailor

), the

whole for a part

(as

the law

for

police officer

), the

specific for the general

(as

cutthroat

for

assassin

), the

general for the specific

(as

thief

for

pickpocket

).

“I fought the law and the law won” (Bobby Fuller)

Slide30

End Rhyme

Rhyme that occurs at the end of the lines“Take me back to the time we had our very first fight,The slamming of doors instead of kissing goodnight,You stayed outside till the morning light” (Taylor Swift)

Slide31

Internal Rhyme

Rhyme that occurs within a single line (or sentence)“Your faith walks on broken glass and the hangover doesn't pass” (Green Day)“I lost my fake ID but you lost the motel key” (Katy Perry)

Slide32

Identify the literary device: (figurative language)

1. Hot-hearted Beowulf was bent upon battle - from

Beowulf

2. Though I was on the sheer face of a mountain, the feeling

of swinging through the air was euphoric, almost like flying without wings.

3. For the sky and the sea, and the sea and the sky - from the

Rime of the Ancient Mariner

by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

4. Her romantic mind was like the tiny boxes, one within the other, that come from the puzzling East . . . —

Peter Pan

, by J. M. Barrie.

5. In the eastern sky there was a yellow patch like a rug laid for the feet of the coming sun . . . —

The Red Badge of Courage

, by Stephen Crane

Slide33

Bang, clang, and hiss are examples of what type of figurative language?

Slide34

What type of figurative language is the following sentence?

Helga hangs handkerchiefs on the line.

Slide35

What type of figurative language is the following sentence?

The boy could swim like a fish.

Slide36

What type of figurative language is used in the following sentence?

John is a mountain

o

n the field.

Slide37

What type of figurative language is used in the following sentence?

Jimmy is so skinny, a skeleton looks fatter than he does!

Slide38

What type of figurative language is the following sentence?

The trees danced by the shore.

Slide39

Theme/Subject

Theme is a message/lesson that the work transmits or a statement about life in general – usually the “human condition” (THE MEssage)The subject of a work is the literal focus of the plotSubject: blue people vs. humansTheme: corporations should not exploit cultures for material gain

Slide40

Symbolism

A symbol is something specific or concrete used to represent something abstract (colors too!)Heart = Love; Ocean = Change

Slide41

Tone, Mood, and Diction

Tone

– The author’s implied attitude towards the subject and audience

- Ex: Informal or Formal, Bitter, Playful, Serious

Mood

– The feeling created in the reader by a literary work.

TONE = TELLER

MOOD = ME

Diction

– Author’s choice of words.

Slide42

JOURNAL

Write an example of

10

different types of figurative language

(use complete sentences

)

(from IDIOMS to INTERNAL RHYME)