College of Engineering and Applied Sciences
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College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Mechanical Engineering Department . Motion Control of Robot for passive rehabilitation of human shoulder . Presented by. Md. . Rasedul. Islam. PhD Student. Mechanical Engineering Department. .

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College of Engineering and Applied Sciences




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Presentation on theme: "College of Engineering and Applied Sciences"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Mechanical Engineering Department

Motion Control of Robot for passive rehabilitation of human shoulder

Presented by

Md

Rasedul

Islam

PhD Student

Mechanical Engineering Department

Slide2

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Mechanical Engineering Department

American Heart Association reports

Incorporation of robots in rehabilitation started back in early 1990s

Approximately 785,000 persons experiences a new or recurrent cerebral vascular accident (CVA) in US

Among which 58000 people experience mobility impairment

Having difficulty doing ADLs (Reaching, Gripping, Touching

etc

)

I

t

is essential to restore motor function

in

order to perform

ADL and return the domestic

and social

life

Task specific Repetitive

therapy program help regain lost

mobility

Limited number of health professionals

Slide3

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Mechanical Engineering Department

Robots in Rehabilitation

Robots have the potentiality in rehabilitation programs.

Incorporation

of robots in rehabilitation started back in early

1990s.

Two types end-effector type (MIT-Manus) and exoskeleton type (Armin-III)

In this project, a robotic device for shoulder rehabilitation were designed and controlled.

Slide4

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Mechanical Engineering Department

Range of

movements

 

 

 

 

Shoulder

Joint

Types of Motion

Range

 

Joint 1

Abduction

180

Adduction

-50°

 

Joint 2

Vertical Flexion

180°

Vertical Extension-50° Joint 3Internal Rotation-90°External Rotation90°

The

table shows the range of movement and adopted from

winter (2008).

The current robots has

3 DOF

with wider range of motion

Slide5

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Mechanical Engineering Department

Kinematic Model

Joint (

i

)

α

i-1

a

i-1

d

i

θ

i

1

0

0

0

θ

1

2

90°

00θ2390°0L2θ3Table-2: Modified Denavit-Hartenberg parameters

Figure: Link-Frame assignment

Slide6

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Mechanical Engineering Department

Control

A non linear computed torque control technique was used to control the robot

Figure: Control Architecture

Slide7

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Mechanical Engineering Department

Simulation

To evaluate the performance of developed control technique, simulation was run to see the trajectory tracking of each joint movement.

Figure: Simulation result

Slide8

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Mechanical Engineering Department

Simulation (Continued)

The above graphs plotted from simulated results show comparison of measured trajectory (outcome of simulation) with desired trajectory (given), error and required torque as

well.

The measured trajectory is almost overlapped the given trajectory (Plot of angle against time).

The error (difference between reference and given trajectory) is lower than 0.05° that shows the efficacy of controller

(Plot of

error

against time

).The control is robust enough to handle the Nosie.

Slide9

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Mechanical Engineering Department

Future Works

Our ultimate goal is to develop a whole arm wearable exoskeleton for supper limb rehabilitation.

The proposed exoskeleton would be smart and intelligent.

It would have a fine and adaptive controller.

The control with EMG and signal would be incorporated in the controller.

Slide10

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Mechanical Engineering Department

Thanks

Slide11

College of Engineering and Applied Sciences

Mechanical Engineering Department

References

Mozaffarian

, D., Benjamin, E.J., Go, A.S., Arnett, D.K (2015). "Heart disease and stroke statistics—2015 update: a report from the American Heart Association". American Heart Association. Circulation. 2015;131:e29–e322

Heidenreich

, P.,

Trogdon

, J (2011). "Forecasting the Future of Cardiovascular Disease: A Policy Statement from the American Heart Association. Circulation"

Circulation. 2011;123:933-944. https://doi.org/10.1161/CIR.0b013e31820a55f5

Craig, John J. Introduction to Robotics: Mechanics and Control. Noida, India: Dorling Kindersley (India) Pvt. Ltd, 2009. Print.

4. Pons

JL, ed. Wearable robots:

biomechatronic

exoskeletons, vol. 338. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley;