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A Snapshot of Engaged Scholarship at the University of Memp

2012 Survey Results from the Engaged Scholarship Faculty Committee. Study Goals. To learn more about the scope and reach of community involvement by faculty members at the University of Memphis. . To generate short and long term recommendations for advancing Engaged Scholarship at the University of Memphis. .

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A Snapshot of Engaged Scholarship at the University of Memp






Presentation on theme: "A Snapshot of Engaged Scholarship at the University of Memp"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

A Snapshot of Engaged Scholarship at the University of Memphis:

2012 Survey Results from the Engaged Scholarship Faculty CommitteeSlide2

Study Goals

To learn more about the scope and reach of community involvement by faculty members at the University of Memphis.

To generate short and long term recommendations for advancing Engaged Scholarship at the University of Memphis. Slide3

Survey Administration and Sample Size

A Qualtrics survey, designed by the Engaged Scholarship Faculty Committee, was sent by the Provost’s office to all U of M faculty.

390 individuals responded; 248 surveys were completed in full.

This presentation reports data from the 248 completed surveys.Slide4

Sample Demographics: GenderSlide5

Sample Demographics: EthnicitySlide6

Years of EmploymentSlide7

Academic RankSlide8

Colleges & Schools Represented in Sample

College of Arts

and Sciences

42%

College of Communications

and Fine Arts

18%

College

of

Education

, Health, and Human Sciences

14%

Fogelman

College of

Business

and Economics

11%

Herff College of Engineering

4%

Lowenberg

School of

Nursing

3%

University

Libraries

2%

School of Communication

Sciences and Disorders

2%

University College

2%

Cecil C. Humphreys School of Law

1%

School of Public Health

1%Slide9

Tenure Status of Respondents

Not on

Tenure-track

42%

Tenured

40%

On Tenure-track/untenured

18%Slide10

The Nature of Community InvolvementSlide11

My Community Involvement Involves:Slide12

What Issues Do You Work On In Your Community-Based Research?Slide13

Respondent Examples of Community Involvement

Demonstrating U of M Faculty Collaboration

, Applied Research,

Capacity-Building,

External Funding,

Reciprocity, and Shared Ownership of ResultsSlide14

Example of Community Involvement

“I have worked on the Living Wage Campaign, drafted a non-discrimination ordinance for County and City employees, and drafted an Anti-bullying bill for the TNGA

.”Slide15

Example of Community Involvement

“As

part of NIH grant (2004-2011) and a grant from the TBR Diversity Office, we worked with Memphis City Schools in neighborhoods with large Hispanic populations. We conducted longitudinal research in elementary schools. Currently, as part of a US

Dept.

of Education grant, we have developed a clinic with onsite Spanish-English interpreters to better serve the Hispanic community. As part of this grant, we have reached out to area clinics, physicians, churches, and Latino Memphis, to make the community aware of the services we are now able to provide. The response has been very

positive…”Slide16

Example of Community Involvement

“Held

, along with students of architecture at the

U of M,

design charettes with members of communities to allow citizens the opportunity to make suggestions, offer solutions, and generate buy-in in the design of their community. Furthermore, work with other civic groups to determine the best ways to plug citizen groups into the fulfillment of the community masterplan

.”Slide17

Examples of Community Partners

AmeriCorps

ArtsMemphis

Baptist Hospice

BRIDGES USA

Central Arkansas Water

City of West Memphis

Friends of T.O. Fuller

Germantown Performing Arts Centre Youth Symphony Orchestra

Livable Memphis

Make a Splash Mid-South Swimming Program

The Med

Memphis Advisory Council for the Hearing Impaired

Memphis Area Legal Services

Memphis Arts Festival

Memphis Grizzlies

Memphis Police Department Blue C.R.U.S.H

Methodist Hospitals

Mid-South Reads

Pink Palace

Shelby County Government

Shelby Farms Park Conservancy

St. Jude Research Hospital

Memphis City Schools

TN Parks and Greenways

Tipton County Schools

Urban Land Institute

U.S. Attorney’s Project Safe Neighborhoods

Westwood Neighborhood Association

Workers Interfaith Network

Youth VillagesSlide18

Developing Civically Engaged StudentsSlide19

Providing Service-Learning Opportunities for Students

49% of faculty incorporate, or have incorporated, service-learning within their classes.

84% of instructors who include service-learning do so at least once a year.Slide20

Mentoring Students in Community-Based Work

49% of faculty have mentored students in completion of community-based internships or practica.

Undergraduate and graduate students are pursuing these experiences at a similar rate.Slide21

Example of Service-Learning

“…I

took my students to their neighborhood clean ups to do service and related it to urban sociology and Broken Windows theory

.”Slide22

Example of Collaborative Research

“[I] involved

students in

[an] urban

policy course in

[the] analysis

of policy issues in housing, homelessness,

[and] health

access in partnership with neighborhood associations and nonprofit agencies.”Slide23

Examples of

Mentoring

“...

All funded students must plan and conduct some sort of community outreach …that involves issues pertaining to cultural and linguistic diversity.”

“Students teach art in community settings as part of course requirements. We meet as a team with community representatives and plan appropriately

.”Slide24

Respondent Views on the University’s Commitment to Engaged ScholarshipSlide25

Engaged Scholarship at U of M:

Involves

academic projects that engage faculty members and students in a collaborative and sustained manner

with community

groups.

Connects

university outreach endeavors with community organizational goals.

Furthers

reciprocal relationships between the University and the community.

Entails

shared authority in the research process from design to implementation.

Results

in excellence through such products as peer-reviewed publications, peer-reviewed collaborative

reports, documentation

of impact, and external funding.

57% of

respondents

currently participate in engaged scholarship, or have in the

past

Another

30% would like to do so in the

futureSlide26

Faculty’s first exposure to the principles of Engaged Scholarship?

36% at the University of Memphis

20% as a graduate student at another institution

12

% as

an undergraduate

student at another institutionSlide27

Does the U of M indicate a commitment to community engagement as a priority in its mission statement or vision?

60% Responded YESSlide28

Does the U of M Administration Value and Reward Engaged Scholarship?

35% said YES

24% said

t

o Some ExtentSlide29

Does the U of M formally recognize community engagement through awards and celebrations? Slide30

Does the U of M have mechanisms in place to assess community perceptions of U of M community engagement?Slide31

Does the U of M have a campus-wide coordinating infrastructure to support and advance engaged scholarship?Slide32

Assessment of Engaged Scholarship at U of M

Most faculty know that engaged scholarship is part of the university mission (60%)

Many faculty are either conducting (57%) or would like to conduct engaged scholarship(additional 30%)Slide33

Further Assessment of Engaged Scholarship at U of M

The majority of respondents are involved in community partnerships (65-68%).

However, fewer meet all the criteria of the U of M definition of engaged scholarship, especially with respect to

shared authority

and the production of

peer-reviewed publications, policy change, or external funding

.Slide34

Perceptions of U of M Support for Engaged Scholarship

Most faculty do not feel

engaged scholarship

is widely

rewarded on campus

(only 35% feel that it is

).

Most faculty do not believe engaged scholarship is supported through on-campus infrastructure (only 11% report infrastructure exists).

Most faculty do not believe engaged scholarship is assessed for its value in the wider community (only 11% believe assessment procedures are in place).Slide35

Recommendations

Top Priorities of Survey RespondentsSlide36

Respondent Priorities

Establishing a

campus-wide Center for Community Engagement was a

top priority

for

Survey

respondents (57%).

Other Respondent Recommendations:

Highlight

ES in recruitment and

fundraising materials

Provide

ES mentors for less experienced

faculty

Provide

a variety of financial

incentives

Make

ES a priority in faculty

hiring

Develop

an institutional strategy for tracking for ESSlide37

Recommendations by Engaged Scholarship Faculty Committee

Short Term (9-12 months)Slide38

Centralization/Coordination

Shore up infrastructure and build future capacity through Provost-level support for:

Recurring funds to support faculty

component of Strengthening Communities Initiative

Graduate

Assistantship

dedicated to ESFC

Campus visits by nationally-recognized ES leaders to share best

practices

to enhance ES at the U of MSlide39

Faculty Development

Increase

awareness of engaged

scholarship:

Develop

a “brief” for ES website as a reference for faculty and community partners

Undertake meetings

with departments and/or small groups of faculty to

advance understanding of engaged scholarshipSlide40

Institutional Tracking

Establish

baseline understanding of faculty and student involvement in

ES:

Identify institutional resources where data can be tracked to generate annualized reports of

s

ervice

learning and engaged scholarship Slide41

Recommendations by Engaged Scholarship Faculty Committee

Mid-Term (within 24 months)Slide42

Centralization/Coordination

Establish an Office/Center for Community EngagementSlide43

Faculty Development

Grow

number of faculty conducting engaged

scholarship:

Develop ES faculty mentoring program

Provide small financial incentives for faculty doing service learning related to ES Slide44

Institutional Tracking

Institutionalize

tracking mechanisms for student and faculty doing service learning and/or

ES

Designation of service learning courses in course catalogue Slide45

Recommendations by Engaged Scholarship Faculty Committee

Long Term (2-5 years)Slide46

Centralization/Coordination

Ensure Office/Center is staffed

and funded in a sustainable and integrated

waySlide47

Faculty Development

Broaden involvement of faculty across all Colleges and

SchoolsSlide48

Institutional Tracking

Formalize and standardize tracking of ES across all Colleges and SchoolsSlide49

ESFC Survey Team

Keri Brondo

Katherine Lambert-Pennington

Linda Bennett

Michael

Hagge

Robert Connolly

Questions? Contact:

kbrondo@memphis.edu

or

almbrtpn@memphis.edu