Agenda To Get: To Do: Opener

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Explain the Visual Cliff Experiment. Social Development. Ways in which . infants /. . children learn to relate . to other people. Infants . play by themselves; as they grow they begin to play with others. ID: 728620 Download Presentation

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Agenda To Get: To Do: Opener




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Presentations text content in Agenda To Get: To Do: Opener

Slide1

Agenda

To Get:

To Do:

Slide2

Opener

Explain the Visual Cliff Experiment

Slide3

Social Development

Ways in which

infants /

children learn to relate

to other people

Infants

play by themselves; as they grow they begin to play with others

Slide4

Attachment

Emotional ties

with others

Keeps people together

Essential for infant survival

Development of Attachment

Infants

prefer being held or around ANYONE

By 4 months specific attachment with care givers form esp. Mothers, grows strongest by 6-7 monthsBy 8 months stranger anxiety develops; most notable if touched by strangersSeparation anxiety also develops at this time; crying and behavior changes when primary care giver leaves

Slide5

Attachment

cont

Contact Comfort

Instinctual need to touch and be touched

by something soft, such as skin or fur

Animal studies suggest this is

more important than

the need for foodProvides a secure basis of comfort for infants to explore the world around themHarlow’s Study

Slide6

Attachment

cont

Imprinting

Instinctual attachment

– develops in a critical period

following birth

Animals imprint on the

first moving object they seeKonrad Lorenz did this experiment with geese, and they followed him around, ALL THE TIME!Humans have no known critical period, as evidenced in adopted children attached to adoptive parents long after infancy.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nzs_8oUIE68

Slide7

Secure Attachment

Occurs when

mothers

or other

primary caregivers

are

affectionate and reliable

Typically

mature as secure children: happy, friendlier, and more cooperative with parents and teachers.Insecure AttachmentOccurs when caregivers are unresponsive or unreliableTend to misbehave more oftenDo not do as well in schoolAttachment

cont

Slide8

Styles of Parenting

Differing

dimensions that can be

combined

,

most parents

tend to be in the

center of all four

. Warmth-ColdnessWarm parents show lots of affectionCold parents do not show affection or seem to enjoy their childrenChildren of warm parents are more likely to develop a greater sense of moral goodness and a sense of responsibility when they do wrong

Children of cold parents are usually

more interested in escaping punishment

rather than doing the right thing

Slide9

Styles of Parenting

Strictness-Permissiveness

Strict parents

impose

many rules and supervise children closely

Can’t stand messy environment

Worry kids are having a negative impact on others

Permissive parents impose

fewer rules and watch children less closelyLess concerned about neatnessFeel children need freedom to learn and express themselves to become independentMay be unclear of expectations at timesOverall, research suggests that consistent and firm enforcement of rules fosters achievement and self-control,

esp. when combined with warmth.

Conversely,

physical punishment or constant interference may lead to disobedience and poor grades

in school.

(some states still allow corporal punishment?!)

Slide10

What are the combinations below?

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What are the combinations below?

CS CP WS WP

Slide12

Styles of Parenting

Authoritative

authority”

Warmth with positive strictness

Authoritarian

Obedience for its own sake

“because I said so, that’s why!”

NeglectfulCold and unresponsiveNo rulesIndifferentuninvolvedPermissiveFew or no rulesLenient

Indulgent

Warm and responsive

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Authoritative Authoritarian Permissive Neglectful

Slide14

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Authoritative Authoritarian Permissive Neglectful

Slide16

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Authoritative Authoritarian Permissive Neglectful

Slide18

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Authoritative Authoritarian Permissive Neglectful

Slide20

Slide21

Parenting Style

Identification…

ID and Explain WHY

That 70’s Show

https

://youtu.be/JqwDhzGmnHU

Willy Wonka

https://youtu.be/yxp5diX7ucA

Combo – Brave, Mean Girls, Harry Potter, and Lion Kinghttps://youtu.be/29hzaoWOksE

Slide22

Child Abuse and

Neglect (Good Will Hunting)

Widespread

Can be

physical OR psychological

Estimated at over

3 million kids per year

are abused in the United States

Most goes unreportedRarely do kids report to authoritiesParents tend to protect each other’s abusive behaviorTends to be generational as many parenting styles/techniques are passed from parent to childAbused children are at a higher risk for developing

psychological problems

, are

unsure of themselves

and

less likely to explore

the world around them

Future problems could be

anxiety, depression, low self-esteem, weak friendships (trust) and aggressive behavior

Slide23

Child Abuse and

Neglect

What are the causes?

Stress, particularly the stresses caused by unemployment and poverty

History of child abuse from parents

Acceptance of violence as a means of coping with stress

Lack of

attachement

to a childSubstance abuseRigid attitudes about child rearing

Slide24

Self-Esteem

Begins early in childhood

The

value or worth people attach to themselves

Protects people against stresses and struggles of life

Influences on Self-Esteem

Secure

attachment

Close to parents via love and involvementParents teach/expect appropriate behavior Unconditional Positive RegardParents love and accept children for who they are – regardless of behavior

; “you did wrong, but I still love you.”

Conditional Positive Regard

Parents

only show love when children behave in acceptable ways

Tend to only be happy when pleasing others

= low self-esteem

By 4 years, competence can increase self-esteem

, “I am good at…)

Slide25

Self-Esteem

cont

Gender and Self-Esteem

By

age 5-7

children

value themselves based on physical appearance and performance in school

Cultural Self-fulfilling prophecies? Girls tend to be better at reading and general academicsBoys tend to be better at math and physical skillsAge and Self-Esteem

Competency increased with age/development

However, self-esteem

drops in the pre-teen years

as children begin to

compare themselves to others

Others may not see them as they see themselves – the

AWKWARD stage

Slide26

Guess the Celebrity!

On the following slides there are five well-known celebrities.

They had awkward preteen years…

See if you can identify them before seeing who they are.

Slide27

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Slide45

Scenarios…

You will be assigned a parenting style and a scenario.

Your job is to decide how you would react based on the parenting style you have been assigned.

Slide46

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