Reimagining our Model to Focus on Student Completion

Reimagining our Model to Focus on Student Completion Reimagining our Model to Focus on Student Completion - Start

2017-01-13 71K 71 0 0

Reimagining our Model to Focus on Student Completion - Description

1. Dr. Rob . Johnstone. New Jersey Council of County Colleges. West Windsor, NJ. April 16, 2014. Acknowledgements. The content in this presentation was primarily developed by Dr. Davis Jenkins of the Community College Research Center & Dr. Rob Johnstone of the National Center for Inquiry & .... ID: 509245 Download Presentation

Download Presentation

Reimagining our Model to Focus on Student Completion




Download Presentation - The PPT/PDF document "Reimagining our Model to Focus on Studen..." is the property of its rightful owner. Permission is granted to download and print the materials on this web site for personal, non-commercial use only, and to display it on your personal computer provided you do not modify the materials and that you retain all copyright notices contained in the materials. By downloading content from our website, you accept the terms of this agreement.



Presentations text content in Reimagining our Model to Focus on Student Completion

Slide1

Reimagining our Model to Focus on Student Completion

1

Dr. Rob

Johnstone

New Jersey Council of County Colleges

West Windsor, NJ

April 16, 2014

Slide2

Acknowledgements

The content in this presentation was primarily developed by Dr. Davis Jenkins of the Community College Research Center & Dr. Rob Johnstone of the National Center for Inquiry & Improvement (formerly at The RP Group)This work is also associated with Completion by Design, a five-year initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Other partners whose thought capital contributed to the development include:Completion by Design Assistance Team (CDAT)Jobs for the Future (JFF)JBL AssociatesPublic AgendaWestEd

2

Slide3

Agenda

Discuss the context of completionVisualize the Student ExperienceExplore a Loss-Momentum FrameworkIntroduce an Applied Inquiry Framework & use two real-world examples of looking at progression / completion data a new wayEngage with a set of principles for redesign

Slide4

The Completion Agenda and the Challenge of Student Success

Slide5

A Brief Discussion on the Completion Agenda

National movement – White House, Aspen Prize, AACC’s Voluntary Framework for Accountability, Complete College America, Department of Education, IPEDS Access to Success, Foundations (Gates, Lumina, Kresge)AACC’s “Empowering Community Colleges to Build the Nation’s Future” Implementation GuideOften takes a less “complete” view of completion - need for nuanced view

Slide6

The Challenge of Completion

For Colleges:

FinancialUnder-resourcedIncentives aligned with access, not completionInnovations tend to be isolatedChange is hard, even when the will is there

For Students:

Easy to enroll, easy to drop out

Many enter without a

clear plan, and are placed into developmental education

Lack of confidence,

financial resources and social capital

Slide7

Redesign Systems & Practices for Student Success

Analyze and understand the common barriers and momentum points that students experience

Implement and integrate proven and promising practices to provide students with the quickest, straightest path to completion

Create the conditions for change by empowering interdisciplinary, cross-campus delegations of faculty, staff and administrators

Build infrastructure for continuous improvement

Slide8

The Student Experience

Slide9

Slide10

Exploring the Preventing Loss, Creating Momentum Framework

Slide11

Loss & Momentum Framework

CONNECTION

Interest to Application

ENTRYEnrollment to Completion of Gatekeeper Courses

PROGRESSEntry into Course of Study to 75% Requirements Completed

COMPLETIONComplete Course of Study to Credential with Labor Market Value

POLICIES

PRACTICES

PROGRAMS

PROCESSES

Slide12

Discussion

What are some key loss points you have observed for your students at each stage?

What are some key momentum points that you have identified that accelerate progress and lead to higher outcomes?

Slide13

PROGRESS

ENTRY

COMPLETION

CONNECTION

Students never apply to college

Students delay entry into college

College

c

ounseling patterns that lead to:- under enrollment- little program-specific guidance- missed financial aid opportunities

Unstructured programs / too many choices

Extended onramps delay entry to programs of study

Students

f

ail

to enroll/pass Gatekeeper

courses

Poor work-school balance

Part-time enrollment forcing long completion times

Progress not monitored / feedback given

Life events / “Stop out or drop out”

Transfer without credential

Students accumulate credits (& debt) not aligned with completion

Never complete college level math

Credential doesn’t support needed wage & aren’t stackable

Completion by Design Framing Model

Some Known Loss Points

Poor academic preparation

Slide14

Connection/Entry: Findings

Many students undecided

D

efaulted

into

“gen

ed

” (and thus “

dev

ed

”)

Dev

ed

students diverted, not building

skills

Many

students drop out after 1-2

terms

CTE program students older, clearer

goals

“Concentrators” more likely to complete

Math & English 101 not only “gatekeepers”

Slide15

Progress: Findings

Students

very

confused by transfer process

Many don’t follow “catalogue” curriculum

Low rate of gen

ed

core

completion

Enrollment

continuity may be as important as

intensity

Slide16

Completion: Findings

Most transfer without associate

degree

Many graduates earn “excess” credits

Many students “linger”

Relatively few “stacking” credentials

Slide17

Supporting Evidence

Slide18

PROGRESS

ENTRY

COMPLETION

CONNECTION

foster college-going norms in High School

expand awareness of college programs and requirements

dual enrollment

& AP

credit

Completion by Design Framing Model

Momentum Strategies

take

placement test in

high school

educational planning in high school

a

ggressive

f

inancial

a

id support

a

ccelerate entry to POS

s

horter, faster, cheaper course design

e

ffective

a

cademic catch-up programs

m

andatory intrusive advising focused on programs of study

p

rograms to incentivize optimal attendance

s

tudent progress to completion monitored & feedback provided

a

ccelerated competency-based programs

emergency aid for students

remove barriers to graduation

Learn & Earn and Career Pathway programs

incentives to transfer with credentials

mandatory intrusive advising toward certificates degrees & transfer

First Time Student

Successful Completion

Slide19

More Supporting Evidence

Slide20

CbD Design Principles

Adapted from presentations by Johnstone and Davis Jenkins (CCRC) and WestEd’s Changing Course

20

Slide21

Student Pathway

Enter Program of Study

Complete

Program, Advance to Further Education and in Career

Consider

College

Education

CONNECTION

From interest to application

ENTRY

From entry to passing program gatekeeper courses

PROGRESS

From program entry to completion of program requirements

COMPLETION

Completion of credential of value for further education and labor market advancement

Slide22

Pathway Models Compared

Self-Service (Status Quo)Guided Pathways

Clear roadmaps to student end goals

Too many choices

Program paths unclear

Default, whole-program schedules

“Opt-in” career and college planning

Required academic plans

Dev ed narrowly focused on Math &English 101, no “soft skills” prep

Intake system redesigned as“on-ramp” to program of study

Students’ progress not monitored

Progress tracking, regular feedback& support

High school, ABE/ESL, non-creditpoorly aligned with college

Bridges to college

programs

from

High school, ABE/ESL, non-credit

Slide23

Placement Testing

Voluntary Orientation

Meet with Advisor (1st Term Schedule)

Dev Reading

DevENGL

Dev Math

Transfer as Junior in Major

Career-Path Employment

Career-Path Employment

General Education Core

Math 101

ENGL 101

Health

Prereqs

A.A. Electives

Business

Electives

A.S.

Pre-major

Nursing

Allied Health

Certificates

A.A.S.

ABE, ESL, GED

Strong connection -

Weak connection -

Intake

STATUS QUO CONNECTION of PATHWAYS

Slide24

24

#1 – Accelerate entry into coherent programs of study#2 – Minimize time to get college-ready#3 – Ensure students know requirements to succeed#4 – Customize & contextualize instruction #5 – Integrate student support with instruction#6 – Monitor student progress & provide feedback#7 – Reward completion behaviors#8 – Leverage technology to improve learning

CBD Design Principles

Slide25

Pathway Principle #1 – Accelerate Entry into Coherent Programs of Study

FeaturesProvide a structured, efficient, and prescriptive student progression experienceClear sequence of courses that lead to completionDiscussion QuestionsWhen does a student at your college learn about the various programs of study?What guidance is provided that can help a student select a program of study based on their interests, skill levels, and long term goals?

25

Slide26

Pathway Principle #2 – Minimize Time to Get College Ready

FeaturesEnsure students understand assessment & placement process and importance of preparationClearly communicate requirements for degrees & certificates and the path to achieving themDiscussion QuestionsHow does your institution work with your feeder high schools to help potential students understand the impact of and prepare for the placement test?How long do dev ed students spend in remedial courses?

26

Slide27

Pathway Principle #3 – Ensure Students Know Requirements to Succeed

FeaturesClearly map out program requirements and sequencePrescribe course of study for students based on goals and level of readinessDiscussion QuestionsCurrently, how do students obtain necessary info about requirements for achieving their educational goals?What existing systems (e.g. technology) could you and your colleagues leverage to help students better understand the requirements for success?

27

Slide28

Pathway Principle #4 – Customize and Contextualize Instruction

FeaturesUse program-specific content to make developmental education relevant and engagingUse of experiential learningDiscussion QuestionsDo your current dev ed courses offer students opportunities to explore their fields of interest and provide a context for the math, reading & writing that they are learning? Why or why not?How might you go about contextualizing some of your dev ed courses? Who would nee to be involved?

28

Slide29

Pathway Principle #5 – Integrate Student Support With Instruction

FeaturesEmbed student support within instruction where appropriateEnsure student support serves students who most need itDiscussion QuestionsWhen your students need support, how do they find it?How might your institution make it easier for students who are reluctant to ask for help, or unaware where to find it, to get the assistance they need?

29

Slide30

Pathway Principle #6 – Continually Monitor Student Progress & Provide Feedback

FeaturesMonitor and celebrate student progress toward goals and provide prompt and tailored feedbackUse data on student progress to inform planning and creation of safety netsDiscussion QuestionsHow do students currently find out about their progress toward their educational goals?What customization rules might you consider implementing for students who have a certain experience?

30

Slide31

Pathway Principle #7 – Reward Behaviors that Contribute to Completion

FeaturesPotential for monetary incentives to encourage progress / completionAlso consider non-monetary incentives such as recognition of progressDiscussion QuestionsWhat are possible monetary and non-monetary incentives that could support progress and achievement of key milestones at your college?When students reach important milestones, does anybody know it?

31

Slide32

Pathway Principle #8 – Leverage Technology to Improve Learning / Service Delivery

FeaturesUse technology to monitor and celebrate progressUse of technology within curriculumDiscussion QuestionsHow are student at your institution currently using technology in their educational experience?What is the impact of that technology use?Can you identify an area where technology could be implemented in your work?

32

Slide33

Required Initial Orientation

Transfer as Junior in Major

Career-Path Employment

Career-Path Employment

English, Arts, Humanities

Certificates

A.A.S.

Contextualized Basic Skills (e.g. I-BEST)

Strong connection -

Weak connection -

Required Career Interest and Academic Readiness Testing

Meet with Advisor (Choose initial program stream; plan full program schedule)

Social/Behavioral Science

STEM

Business

Health Sciences

Program

On-Ramp

Education, Child Care

Social Services

First-Year Experience

Program

On-Ramp

Program

On-Ramp

Program

On-Ramp

Program

On-Ramp

Program

On-Ramp

DESIRED STATE for CONNECTION of PATHWAYS

Slide34

Discussion

What are some of the key features of an coherent pathway for your students?As you think about the design principles, where might you start with action steps that lead you to a more coherent pathway for your students?

34

Slide35

Model Implementation at Scale

Slide36

The CBD Inquiry Guide Series

36

Slide37

The CBD Inquiry Guide Series

37

Slide38

The CBD Inquiry Guide Series

38

Slide39

The CBD Inquiry Guide Series

39

Slide40

Find Out More

40

NCII & CCRC websites:

www.inquiry2improvement.com

ccrc.tc.columbia.edu

Dr. Rob Johnstone, Founder & President

rob@inquiry2improvement.com

CBD Inquiry Guides

http://

www.inquiry2improvement.com/publications-resources

Slide41


About DocSlides
DocSlides allows users to easily upload and share presentations, PDF documents, and images.Share your documents with the world , watch,share and upload any time you want. How can you benefit from using DocSlides? DocSlides consists documents from individuals and organizations on topics ranging from technology and business to travel, health, and education. Find and search for what interests you, and learn from people and more. You can also download DocSlides to read or reference later.