Innocent gestures that mean rude things abroad  The Okay In some Middle Eastern countries such as Kuwait the okay sign signifies the evil eye
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Innocent gestures that mean rude things abroad The Okay In some Middle Eastern countries such as Kuwait the okay sign signifies the evil eye

brPage 3br The Finger In the Philippines summoning someone with a finger is considered suitable only for dogs and is punishable by arrest brPage 4br The Point Pointing with your finger is rude in so many countries its probably wise just to abandon t

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Innocent gestures that mean rude things abroad The Okay In some Middle Eastern countries such as Kuwait the okay sign signifies the evil eye




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Presentation on theme: "Innocent gestures that mean rude things abroad The Okay In some Middle Eastern countries such as Kuwait the okay sign signifies the evil eye"— Presentation transcript:


Page 1
Innocent gestures that mean rude things abroad
Page 2
The Okay In some Middle Eastern countries, such as Kuwait, the okay sign signifies the evil eye.
Page 3
The Finger In the Philippines summoning someone with a finger is considered suitable only for dogs and is punishable by arrest.
Page 4
The Point Pointing with your finger is rude in so many countries it's probably wise just to abandon the gesture altogether overseas.
Page 5
The Feed Don't eat anything with your left hand in Muslim countries or in India. That part of the body is used

for an entirely different function in such places, one people don't want to be reminded of when eating. The left hand really is a poor relation of the right in these parts of the world; you should also avoid gesturing or shaking hands with it.
Page 6
The hold hand Young boys can hold hands without comment in Australia, but grown men? It's probably a sign that they're partners, although traditional values being what they are, still not a common one. However, such Western views may represent a minority worldwide. It's quite unremarkable to see two male chums walking down the street

holding hands, or arm in arm, in India and in Muslim and African lands.
Page 7
The Slurp Slurping your soup or indeed your coffee or tea might be a no no at your average Aussie table but in Japan it's considered good table manners. Slurping indicates you're enjoying the meal
Page 8
The Tardy Arriving 10 minutes late to a dinner party or drinks bash is considered polite in Oz but it's actually rather modest by some countries' standards. An hour's lateness is standard in laidback Argentina. Even three hours would not be thought rude for some informal occasions. And which

country in the world puts the most emphasis on turning up exactly on time? No prizes for guessing the likely candidate. It's Germany
Page 9
The happy snap It's easy enough to be offended in your own country by intrusive tourists snapping your photo without permission. On other occasions, you might be that intrusive tourist yourself. But the offence can go much further in certain African countries, such as in rural Ghana, where people might fear this does make a certain sense that by photographing them you are stealing their soul.
Page 10
The compliment "Oh, I love your

settee!" is a harmless compliment and perhaps a little white lie when visiting someone's house in the West. But be wary of making such a remark in Arab and African countries, such as Jordan, Senegal and Nigeria. Your host might think he or she is obliged to give you the item in question. An awkward situation all round, especially if you have to cart the sofa home on your back.
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This means "Victory" in most of Europe when you make this sign with your palm facing away from you. If you face your palm in, the same gesture means "Shove it."
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Smile This gesture is

universally understood. However, it various cultures there are different reasons for smiling. The Japanese may smile when they are confused or angry. In other parts of Asia, people may smile when they are embarrassed. People in other cultures may not smile at everyone to indicate a friendly greeting as we do in the United States. A smile may be reserved for friends. It is important not to judge students or their parents because they do not smile, or smile at what we would consider "inappropriate" times.
Page 13
Sit with sole of feet or shoe showing In many cultures this sends a rude

message. In Thailand, Japan and France as well as countries of the Middle and Near East showing the soles of the feet demonstrates disrespect. You are exposing the lowest and dirtiest part of your body so this is insulting.
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Pat a student on the head This is very upsetting to students from Asia. The head is the repository of the soul in the Buddhist religion. Children from cultures which are influenced by Buddhism will feel uncomfortable if their head is touched.
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Pass an item to someone with one hand In Japan this is very rude. Even a very small item such as

a pencil must be passed with two hands. In many Middle and Far Eastern countries it is rude to pass something with your left hand which is considered
Page 16
Wave hand with palm facing outward to greet someone In Europe, waving the hand back and forth can mean raise the palm outward and wag the fingers in unison, This is also a serious insult in Nigeria if the hand is too face.
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Nod head up and down and Greece, this gesture