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Analogy Analogy

Analogy - PowerPoint Presentation

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Uploaded On 2016-03-29

Analogy - PPT Presentation

sly crafty glum 2 1 you cut the lawn good said mom proudly 2 mary and her wants to play Tennis at south park DOL level 4 week 35 ID: 271298

day word body closing word day closing body learn mail line lesson verb participle form sleeker participial slimmer crabbier

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Slide1

Analogysly : crafty – glum : _______ 2. : - :1. you cut the lawn good said mom proudly2. mary and her wants to play Tennis at south park

DOL level 4 week 35

gloomySlide2

PledgeSlide3

Fluency6 min. reading solutionSlide4

Objectives day 2Students willrecognize superlative adjectives and adverbs. Slide5

Word Structure day 2Line 1

Line 2

Line 3

Line 4

tastiest

angriestspiciest

laziestfarthestfastest

earliestlatestsaddesthappiest

richestpooreststrongest

lightestmeanestcraziestSlide6

Word Structure day 2The words on this line are superlative adverbs. They indicate the highest degree or quality of an action.For example: Of all my friends, I arrived earliest. You create a sentence: Of all my friends, _______.Adverbs describe verbs or other adverbs – they tell how or to what degree an action takes place.

farthest

fastest

earliestlatest

Line 2Slide7

Word Structure day 3The word pairs in this line have opposite meanings.What spelling change was necessary to form saddest?Can you think of other superlative adjective pairs that are opposite in meaning?

saddest

happiestrichest

poorest

Line 3Slide8

Word Structure day 4These words indicate the highest degree or quality of an action.For example: Of all the dogs at the pound, the dog I chose was the craziest. You make up a sentence: Of all the __________, _________.

strongest

lightest

meanestcraziest

Line 4Slide9

Vocabulary lesson 3demanded

protested

To ask firmly

To say in disagreement

Very nice

discardedThrown away

He demanded his dinner early

She protested against going to bed earlyHe wore a fine suit

He discarded his old clothing

fineSlide10

Vocabulary lesson 3possessions

wealth

Things that someone owns

A great amount of money

The rich man had lots of possessions

Their family had a lot of wealthSlide11

Genre FolktaleElements of a FolktaleA folktale is an old story, told and retold, passed from generation to generation by word of mouth.Similar versions of some folktales can be found throughout the world.The characters can be objects or animals that speak.A folktale often contains a moral, or lesson in life.Goodness and intelligence win over evil and foolishness.Slide12

Comprehension StrategiesPredicting Use clues in the text and prior knowledge to make predictions. Recognize when predictions are or are not confirmed by the text. Update your prediction during reading based on information in the text.Visualizing Recognize appropriate places in the text to stop and visualize. Visualize literal ideas or scenes described by the author.

Make inferences while visualizing to show understanding of characters’ feelings, mood, and setting. The visualizations go beyond the author’s literal words.Slide13

PurposeBigIdea

How do people make money choices?Slide14

Handing OffHave you grasped the following ideas?Why the poor couple save their money for a new spoonThat the rich man is upset by the fact that the poor couple know someone who uses a different spoon for every biteWhat the story teaches us about money choices and why people make certain choices. Focus Question?Why does money cause so many problems?Why do different people value things differently?Slide15

Inquiry Process day 2Make a ConjectureA conjecture begins with phrases such as I think that or Maybe. Can you give some examples of this?Slide16

Inquiry Process day 3Make a ConjectureA conjecture begins with phrases such as I think that or Maybe. Work together to create your own conjectures. Slide17

Inquiry Process day 4Make a ConjectureHow can you determine what sources you should and will use to prove, disprove, or modify your conjectures? Slide18

WritingPersonal Letters via E-Mail day 2Remember to write appropriately for their chosen audience and keep in mind what your recipients already know. For example, if writing to kindergarteners, they probably should not use difficult vocabulary or write about concepts that they are learning in science. Make your first drafts on a word document that can be saved and corrected.

Salutation

– use the word Dear followed by the person’s name and a comma.Body – This is the message

part of the letter that starts two lines below the salutation. Indent the first word in each paragraph on the body.

Closing – Yours truly and Sincerely are commonly used for a closing. The closing goes two lines below the body. Capitalize the first word, and use a comma at the end of the closing.

Signature –This is where you type your name.Type this letter on a word document fist. You can save it and make corrections.Slide19

WritingPersonal Letters via E-Mail day 3Letters sent via e-mail are similar to those sent through regular mail, with a few exceptions:At the top of the e-mail message is the word to: where you type the e-mail address of the person to whom you are sending the letter.Type the subject of your e-mail after the word Subject.Remember the body includes everything you want to say.

Salutation

– use the word Dear followed by the person’s name and a comma.Body – This is the message

part of the letter that starts two lines below the salutation. Indent the first word in each paragraph on the body.

Closing – Yours truly and Sincerely are commonly used for a closing. The closing goes two lines below the body. Capitalize the first word, and use a comma at the end of the closing.

Signature –This is where you type your name.Type this letter on a word document fist. You can save it and make corrections.Slide20

WritingPersonal Letters via E-Mail day 4e-mail message are instantaneous. You should pause before clicking the word Send to make sure the tone and content are correct.Model for revising the tone and formality of language .Grandfather:Just wanted to tell you thanks for the game, totally awesome! Played for hours with friends. See you later, Shelly.

Dear Grandfather,

I wanted to tell you how grateful I am for the game you gave me for my birthday. It is awesome! I played it with my friends for three hours on Saturday.Thanks again!Love,

Shelly

Salutation – use the word Dear followed by the person’s name and a comma.Body – This is the message

part of the letter that starts two lines below the salutation. Indent the first word in each paragraph on the body.Closing

– Yours truly and Sincerely are commonly used for a closing. The closing goes two lines below the body. Capitalize the first word, and use a comma at the end of the closing.Signature –This is where you type your name.Slide21

Objectives day 2Students willreview double negatives.learn how to combine sentences with participial phrases.learn how to use the card or computer catalog.learn how to use multimedia in presentations. Slide22

Objectives day 3Students willreview double negatives.learn how to combine sentences with participial phrases.learn how to use the card or computer catalog.learn how to use multimedia in presentations. Slide23

Objectives day 4Students willreview double negatives.learn how to combine sentences with participial phrases.learn how to use the card or computer catalog.learn how to use multimedia in presentations. Slide24

Grammar, Usage, and MechanicsDay 2Combining Sentences with Participial PhrasesOverflowing with emotion, the parents hugged their son.A participle is a verb form used as an adjective. Add –ing to a verb to form the present participle, and add –ed to a verb to form the past participle, unless the verb is irregular.

A participial phrase is a group of words that begins with a participle and modifies a noun or a pronoun.Write a couple of sentences using participles.Slide25

Grammar, Usage, and MechanicsDay 3Combining Sentences with Participial PhrasesThe miser looked at his gold. At the same time, he was gloating.Gloating, the miser looked at his gold.A participle is a verb form used as an adjective. Add –ing to a verb to form the present participle, and add –

ed to a verb to form the past participle, unless the verb is irregular.A participial phrase is a group of words that begins with a participle and modifies a noun or a pronoun.

Write a couple of sentences using participles.Slide26

Grammar, Usage, and MechanicsDay 4Using the Card or Computer CatalogA computer catalog lists every book in a library and its location. In some libraries, the catalog consists of cabinets of index cards, although many libraries now use computers to catalog their books. Books can be referenced by Author Title SubjectGo to the school library and find at least

three sources for your inquiry investigation.Slide27

Spellingwealthierfinerdroopierfaster

larger

madderwiderluckier

sleekersurer

crabbierslimmerwarmer

dullerlowerstifferlittler

firmerruderfresherhealthier

tougherSlide28

wealthierfinerdroopierfasterlargermadder

wider

luckiersleekersurer

crabbierslimmer

warmerdullerlower

stifferlittlerfirmerruder

fresherhealthier

tougherSlide29

SpellingUnit 6 Lesson 3Group Awealthierfinerdroopierfaster

largermadder

widerluckiersleeker

surercrabbierslimmer

warmerdullerlowerstifferlittler

firmerruderfresherhealthiertougher

SpellingUnit 6 Lesson 3Group Awealthier

finerdroopierfasterlarger

madderwiderluckiersleekersurer

crabbierslimmerwarmerdullerlower

stifferlittlerfirmerruder

fresherhealthiertougherSpelling

Unit 6 Lesson 3Group Awealthierfiner

droopierfasterlargermadder

widerluckiersleekersurer

crabbierslimmerwarmerduller

lowerstifferlittlerfirmer

ruderfresherhealthiertougher

SpellingUnit 6 Lesson 3Group A

wealthier

finer

droopier

faster

larger

madder

wider

luckier

sleeker

surer

crabbier

slimmer

warmer

duller

lower

stiffer

littler

firmer

ruder

fresher

healthier

tougher

Spelling

Unit 6 Lesson 3

Group A

wealthier

finer

droopier

faster

larger

madder

wider

luckier

sleeker

surer

crabbier

slimmer

warmer

duller

lower

stiffer

littler

firmer

ruder

fresher

healthier

tougherSlide30

demanded To ask firmly

protested

To say in disagreement

fineVery nice

discardedThrown awaypossessions

Things that someone owns wealth

A great amount of moneySlide31

Slide32

To ask firmlyTo say in disagreementVery niceThrown away

Things that someone ownsA great amount of moneySlide33

demanded

protested

fine

discarded

possessions

wealth