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Urban Health Initiative


CatalysingChangeAir pollution is a health issue with real health31costsAir pollution causes seven million deaths each year exerts an economic burden of between billions and trillions of dollars and is

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Document on Subject : "Urban Health Initiative"— Transcript:

1 Urban Health Initiative Catalysing C
Urban Health Initiative Catalysing Change Air pollution is a health issue, with real healthcosts Air pollution causes seven million deaths each year, exerts an economic burden of between billions and trillions of dollars, and is responsible for over one–third of deaths by lung cancer, stroke and pulmonary disease. Urban planning is a health issue, and health is an urban planning issue An estimated 91% of people living in urban areas are exposed to polluted air. The sectors that are the biggest causes of urban air pollution – transport, energy, waste and industry – also contribute to other major health risks, including trafc injuries, noise stressors, barriers to physical activity and sanitation risks. Policies and investments supporting cleaner transport, energy-efcient housing, power generation, industry and better municipal waste management are therefore essential to healthy cities. Health needs to be at the table when cities shape policies that have health costs and benets The health sector is integral to the policy-making process. Health impacts, costs and benets are signicant and need to be modelled, included and anticipated for more accurate economic cost-benet analyses. Health arguments, incentives and linkages could be more effectively used to unleash action for clean air and better climate. For example: • providing better access to relevant evidence on the linkages between air and climate pollutants and health; • enabling and encouraging health actors to support sector policies that prevent diseases and pollution; • strengthening capacity to analyse, evaluate and communicate health co-benet opportunities from policies and interventions to mitigate air and climate pollutants; and • helping bridge sectoral decision-making silos and thus enhance intersectoral cooperation. The Urban Health Initiative aims for cities to have the data, tools, capacity and processes to include health in the equation The Urban Health Initiative aims to reduce deaths and diseases caused by air and climate pollutants and to help cities reap the benets of policies and measures that tackle air and climate pollution. It aims to equip the health sector with the capacity and tools to demonstrate to the public and decision-makers the full range of health and climate benets that can be achieved from implementing local emission reduction policies and strategies. It works with governments and partners to change the trajectory of a city’s health impacts from air pollution, by: • arming decision-makers with health-based toolsto assess the impacts ofair pollution and unsustainable urban policies; • supporting the mapping of health impacts in transport, land use, energy and housing scenarios; • helping health and development sectors calculate the health costs and benets of choices; • through communications, nudging the health sector, urban leaders and the public to rally aroundhealthier development choices. Urban Health Initiative Making health a priority in the design of air pollution-free cities The Urban Health Initiative goes beyond improving access to health care and promoting healthy behaviours, and focuses on how to build cities that enable and encourage goodhealth. The process: M

2 apping the current situation, policies a
apping the current situation, policies and decision-making processes Assessing the present state of air quality, climate and air pollutant emissions and their sources, identifyingexpected health impacts and identifying gapsin ability to collect comprehensive data that supports policy action. This stage involves mapping all relevant stakeholders. Adaptation and applying health and economic tools in the local context Adapting and applying available tools to assess the health and economic impacts of policies. Developing and testing scenarios Alternative scenarios based on policy options are tested or considered locally to estimate potential health and economic impacts, and preferred policy scenarios or interventions are identied. Health impacts and co both inaction and intervention. Cost-effectiveness and cost plan, strategy or roadmap is developed. Building capacity to ll gaps at all stages Health actors at the policy, programme and service delivery levels are trained to engage in cross-sector policy-making processes, carry out relevant health analyses and communicate effectively with the public on links between climate and air pollutants and health. Communication and outreach to sustain and mobilize support Urban leaders and champions are engaged to communicate costs of inaction, including through the global BreatheLife campaign, intensifying demand for action. Health care workers advise patients and communities about prevention. Targeted outreach to policy-makers and the health sector is conducted, and workshops are implemented. This step includes public outreach and raising awareness. A city-wide communications campaign including media training, outreach and social marketing is conducted. Health and economic arguments provide urban leaders with an incentive to act. Monitoring results and rening policy Development of a monitoring framework establishes a tracking mechanism to follow up on policy change and results from city initiatives to address air pollution and its sources, as well as their link to health. Bringing down air pollution makes sense health-wise, now and as an investment in a clean and liveable future. For more information, contact the Urban Health Initiative: Dr Thiago Hérick de Sá, herickdesat@who.int Urban transport and health specialist Dr Pierpaolo Mudu, mudup@who.int Air quality and health specialist Mr Michael Hinsch, hinschm@who.int Project management Mr Gordon Dakuu, dakuug@who.int UHI focal point, Accra, Ghana Ms Joana Ansong, ansongj@who.int Communications Manager, Accra, Ghana Mr Raja Ram Pote Shrestha, poteshresthar@who.int UHI focal point, Kathmandu, Nepal HEALTH EVIDENCE HEALTH COMMUNICATIONS HEALTH COMPETENCY Designed by Punto Graco puntoo.gracoo@gmail.com Healthy cities – key to SDG attainmentAction in ciies can drive progress towards multiple SDGs: Reduce air pollution (SDGs 3.9 and 11.6) Combatnoncommunicablediseases(NCDs)and related risks like obesity (SDG 3.4) Access to public transport with special attention to women, children, persons with disabilities and older Sanitation and waste management (SDGs 3.9 and 11.6) Equity (SDG 10) Access to safe public and green spaces, particularly for women, children, older persons and persons persons (SDG 11.2)with disabilities (SDG 11.7)Climate action – climate resilience (SDG 13)