OECD Indicators 2019 Education at a Glance -

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OECD Indicators 2019 Education at a Glance

Embargo:. 11am CEST. 10am GMT. 10 September 2019. Tertiary attainment has expanded in the . past. . decade. (. though. the UK . slipped. . slightly. in relative . terms. ). Table. A1.2. Trends in tertiary educational attainment of 25-34 year-olds, 2008 and 2018.

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OECD Indicators 2019 Education at a Glance






Presentation on theme: "OECD Indicators 2019 Education at a Glance"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

OECD Indicators 2019

Education at a Glance

Embargo:

11am CEST

10am GMT

10 September 2019

Slide2

Tertiary attainment has expanded in the past

decade(though the UK

slipped slightly in relative terms)

Table

A1.2

Trends in tertiary educational attainment of 25-34 year-olds, 2008 and 2018

Rank 6

Rank 9

Slide3

A bachelor’s degree is the most common level of tertiary attainment, on average across OECD countries

Figure A1.3

Distribution of 25-34 year-olds with tertiary education, by level of tertiary education (2018)

Rank 7

Rank 26

Slide4

The

employment value of different qualifications

Figure A3.5

Employment rates of tertiary-educated younger adults, by levels of tertiary education (2018)

Slide5

The earnings value of

different qualifications

Figure A4.1Relative earnings of tertiary-educated adults, by educational attainment (2017)

2013: 123%, 2017: 113%

2013: 154%, 2017: 142%

2013: 174%, 2017: 165%

Slide6

Education matters

Slide7

Those

with tertiary education

are less likely to be NEET

Fig.A2.4

Percentage of NEETs (

neither employed nor in education or training

) among 25-29 year-olds, by educational attainment (2018)

Slide8

Tertiary-educated adults are more resilient against long-term unemployment

Figure A3.2

Percentage of long-term unemployed 25-64 year-olds, by educational attainment (2018)

Slide9

The relative earnings

of tertiary-educated adults increases

with professional experience

Figure A4.2

Relative earnings of tertiary-educated adults compared to those with upper secondary education, by age group (2017)

Slide10

In some countries, a significant share of tertiary-educated adults are inactive

Figure A3.3

Employment and inactivity rates of tertiary-educated 25-34 year-olds (2018)

Slide11

Tertiary graduates

are more likely to keep

improving their skills through continuous adult

learning

Figure A7.1

Participation

of 25-64

year-olds in education and training, by educational attainment(2016)

Slide12

Facilitating access to tertiary education

Slide13

Governments

fund a varying share of

tertiary expenditure in OECD countries

Figure C3.2b

Distribution of public and private expenditure on tertiary educational institutions, final source of funds (2016)

Slide14

Public to

private transfers help support students

in countries with high private costs

Figure C3.1

Distribution of transfers and public and private expenditure on educational institutions (2016)

Slide15

Grants or

loans

Figure C5.3

Distribution of students benefiting from public/government-guaranteed loans and scholarships/grants in bachelor's and master's long first degrees or equivalent (2017/18)

Note:

Annual average (or most common) tuition fees charged by public institutions for national students at the bachelor's level are indicated in parenthesis (USD converted using PPPs). The year of reference may differ across countries and economies. Please see Annex 3 for details.

Slide16

Fields in high demand still struggle to find the

skilled workers they need

Slide17

Engineering and ICT graduates

have the highest employment rates…

Figure A3.1

Employment rates of tertiary-educated adults, by field of study (2018)

Health and Welfare

Business, administration and law

Education

Arts and humanities, social sciences and information

Slide18

Change in share of graduates by field of study

Distribution of recent tertiary graduates by field of study, compared with fields of study of all tertiary-education 25-64 year-olds (2017 and 2018)

Slide19

…in particular

among those studying

engineering, manufacturing and constructionFigure A1.b

Share of engineering, manufacturing and construction graduates among all tertiary-educated 25-64 year-olds and recent graduates (2017 and 2018)

Slide20

Despite expanding access, progression through

tertiary education is uneven

Slide21

Only

40% of students entering a

bachelor’s programme graduate within the theoretical duration, on average

Figure B5.1a

Completion rate of full-time students who entered a bachelor's or equivalent

programme

(2017)

Slide22

In some countries,

most students who

drop-out of a tertiary programme do so after the first year

Figure B5.3

Share of full-time bachelor's students who are no longer enrolled in tertiary education (and have not graduated) at various timeframes after entry (2017)

Slide23

More tertiary students are studying abroad

Slide24

The number of international students has more than doubled in less than 20 years

Figure B6.2

Growth in international or foreign enrolment in tertiary education worldwide (1998 to 2017)

Slide25

The share of international

students has increased since

2010 in most OECD countriesFigure B6.1

Incoming student mobility in tertiary education in 2010 and 2017

30% from EU

Slide26

The share of international students grows with each successive level of tertiary education

Figure B6.3

Incoming student mobility in tertiary education, by level of study (2017)

Slide27

Increased financial and human resources have sustained the

expansion of tertiary education

Slide28

Spending

has increased by 9% since

2010, three times more than the increase in the number of tertiary

students

, on average

Index of change in total expenditure on tertiary educational institutions per full-time equivalent student (2016)

Table C1.3 Col. 12,15 & 18

Slide29

Despite

recent increases

in public expenditure, average spending on tertiary institutions, as a share

of GDP, has

fallen

Figure C2.3

Index of change in public expenditure on educational institutions as a percentage of GDP (2010 and 2016)

Slide30

The

number of tertiary teachers

has increased by 1% per year, on average, on par with the number of students

Figure D2.2

Average annual growth rates of the numbers of students and teaching staff in tertiary education (2005-17)

Slide31

Spending

on tertiary institutions by spending

categoryFigure C1.2b

Total expenditure on educational institutions per full-time equivalent student by types of service (2016))

Slide32

Gender affects participation in education

and employment, but in different ways

Slide33

Women are over-

represented in science at master’s level

, but under-represented at doctorate level

Figure B7.4

Share of female graduates in natural sciences, mathematics and statistics at master's and doctoral levels (2017)

Slide34

The employment advantage of a doctorate over a master’s degree is greater for women than for men

Figure B7.5

Relative employment rate of 25-64 year-old doctorate holders compared to master's holders (2018)

Slide35

Tertiary-educated women earn less than men, even among those who studied similar fields

Figure A4.5

Women's earnings as a percentage of men's earnings, by field of study (2017)

Slide36

Lower earnings for tertiary-educated women results in lower financial returns to their education

Figure A5.1

Private net financial returns for a man or a woman attaining tertiary education (2016)

Slide37

Vocational programmes can

provide adults with labour market-relevant skills

Slide38

Engineering, manufacturing and construction are popular fields among upper secondary vocational graduates

Figure B3.3

Distribution of upper secondary vocational programmes by selected field of study (2017)

Slide39

In some countries, young adults turn to vocational upper secondary education to improve their skills

Figure B3.1

Average age of first-time upper secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary graduates, by programme orientation (2017)

Age

Slide40

Starting strong

Slide41

Greater spending on early childhood education and care can improve quality and access

Figure B2.3

Expenditure on all children aged 3 to 5 enrolled in early childhood education and care (ISCED 0) and primary education as a percentage of GDP (2016)

Slide42

Pre-primary education relies heavily on teaching aides

Figure B2.4

Ratio of children to staff in pre-primary (ISCED 02) education (2017)

Note:

Figures in parentheses show the percentages of teachers' aides among ECEC contact staff (teachers and teachers' aides).

Slide43

Allocating adequate resources helps sustain

quality learning at all levels of education

Slide44

Total public expenditure on education increased between 2010 and 2016, on average across OECD countries

Figure C4.2

Index of change in total public expenditure on education as a share of total government expenditure (2010 and 2016)

Slide45

Spending on education institutions ranges from 3% of GDP in Russia to 6% in Norway 

Figure C2.1.

Total expenditure on educational institutions as a percentage of GDP (2016)

Slide46

But the share of private spending on primary to tertiary educational institutions has increased in many countries

Figure C3.3

Change in the relative share of public, private and international expenditure on primary to tertiary

educational institutions (2010, 2016)

Slide47

OECD countries spend about USD 90 700 per student on average, in primary and secondary education

Figure C1.3.

Cumulative expenditure on educational institutions per full-time equivalent student between the age of 6 and 15 (2016)

Slide48

While average class size decreased in most OECD countries, it increased in the UK

Figure D2.3

Average class size in primary education (2005 and 2017)

Slide49

Yet in many countries teachers’ salaries are still low and the earnings progression is flat

Figure D3.2.

Lower secondary teachers’ statutory salaries at different points in teachers' careers (2018)

Slide50

School heads

earn more than

other tertiary-educated workers, while teachers earn

less

, on

average

Figure D3.1

Lower secondary teachers' and school heads' salaries relative to earnings for tertiary-educated workers (2017)

Slide51

Balancing teachers’ salaries and reducing class size

Figure C7.3

Index of change in teachers' salaries and in average class size in primary education between 2005 and 2017

Slide52

Share of teachers’ working time spent on teaching and other activities

Figure D4.4

Percentage of lower secondary teachers' working time spent teaching (2018)

Slide53

Contribution of various factors to salary cost of teachers per student in public institutions, primary education (2017)

Figure C7.2

Slide54

The teaching workforce is ageing

Slide55

The share of teachers under 30 decreases as the level of education taught rises

Figure D5.2

Share of teachers less than 30 years old, by level of education (2017)

Slide56

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