By Joan Clark, PowerPoint Presentation

By Joan Clark, PowerPoint Presentation

2016-04-11 58K 58 0 0

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Speech-Language Pathologist. M.A., CCC-SLP. Facilitatin. g. Success in Academic and Social Situations. Autistic Spectrum Disorders. -Autistic Spectrum Disorder- Level 1. . Formerly diagnosed as:. . ID: 279076

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Slide1

ByJoan Clark, Speech-Language PathologistM.A., CCC-SLP

Facilitatin

g

Success in Academic and Social Situations

Slide2

Autistic Spectrum Disorders

-Autistic Spectrum Disorder- Level 1

Formerly diagnosed as:

Asperger Syndrome

High Functioning Autis

m

-Social (Pragmatic) Communication Disorders

Formerly diagnosed as:

PDD, PDD-NOS

Pragmatic Language Disorder

Slide3

Broad Characteristics

Limited ability and/or interest in social interaction

Restricted and repetitive interests and/or behaviors

Pragmatic language problems

Perspective-taking difficulties

Emotional control issues

Slide4

Traits often Associated with ASD

Sensory issues

Co-morbid Diagnoses

Executive Function difficulties

Fine and gross motor problems

Slide5

Ideas and Techniques

C

ommunication development ideas/activities for home and school

Commercially available therapies for academic and social success.

Techniques and therapies to address difficult behaviors

Slide6

CALM COMMUNICATION

C- Clear, concise, creative

A- Affirming, appreciative, amusing

L- Laser-focused

M- Motivational

Slide7

LISTENING

Probably the most critical element of communication

There are skills involved that make listening both a science and an art

Active listening occurs when a person is actively trying to understand what is being said or taught

Critical listening involves listening to information stated to try to figure out information not stated.

Slide8

Listening Rules

Watch the one who talks

Keep our body still

Sit (stand) up straight and tall

Do not interrupt

Think about the words

Use a friendly face

(to the tune “The farmer in the Dell”)

EXAMPLE: We watch the one who talks, we watch the one who talks,

when we are good listeners

, we watch the one who talks.

Slide9

Speaking Rules

Watch the listener

Speak loud enough to be heard

Speak soft enough to avoid bothering others

Say each word with all its sounds and syllables

Speak slowly

Slide10

Play Games and Have Fun!

Car Games: Who-Where-Why, Guess Who I’m thinking of, Add-a-sentence stories, The Alphabet Game, Counting Games, License Plate GamesManufactured Games: Guess Who, Guesstures, Monopoly, Clue, Battleship, Dictionary Game, Apples to Apples, Life, Headbandz, have your child teach you a game s/he lovesPlay indoor/outdoor Games- Exercise activities including statue, copycat, freeze tag, hide-and-go-seek, ball games, and yoga games; pretend games, cooking activitiesSportsmanship Rewards (go overboard!)

Slide11

Rules

Be concrete, specific, and consistent

Allow child to use rules to make decisions

Create and talk to the child about the rule when she/he is calm and ready to hear.

May be helpful to post written or pictured rules.

Perhaps create “Rules” notebook

Slide12

My RULES Book

State the Draw simple

subject illustration

(ladylike sitting) (female sitting properly)

1. Avoid spreading legs far

far

apart

2. Try to keep knees one hand apart or closer

3. Can touch/cross feet to keep knees closer

Slide13

My RULES Book

State the Draw simple

subject illustration

(texting)

(phone with texts)

1. Don’t respond if I don’t know who sent it

2. Avoid texting if I don’t get a response. Colors of texts should be about the same.

3. If I don’t know what a text means, show an adult.

Slide14

The VISUALS Rule

People with ASD are by nature, very visual

Pictures and written information can be much more powerful and effective than spoken words.

Pictured and written schedules give child a more clear and memorable understanding

Pictures of family, classmates, and friends can be basis of social thinking activities

Slide15

Two Ways to Win, Two Ways to Lose

Winning

1.

Making others feel comfortable by actions or words

. (No matter the result, this person wins!)

2. Being the victor.

Losing

A.

Making others feel uncomfortable by actions or words.

(The victor becomes a loser by doing this.)

B. Being the one who lost the game.

Slide16

Lose to Win

Explain the concept…People who have learned how to lose gracefully are winning the game of life.

Set up a “lose to win” chart.

Goal: I will learn to win by losing with grace.

Set up reinforcement system on chart, so child earns a reward for “X” graceful losses.

Slide17

Other Ideas to Develop Sportsmanship

Tell child that you are often kind by letting “letting” her/him win. Ask if s/he could try to “let” you win. Reinforce efforts!

Get WAY far behind in a game. Encourage your child to give you extra turns or some way to catch up. Reinforce efforts!

Become upset when you lose, so that you look ridiculous. Have your child show you how you should respond, and then do it correctly for him/her.

Slide18

The S-S-S Way

Stress-management- give opportunities to relax

Self-esteem- develop confidence

Strengths- turn an interest or unusual behavior into a positive

Slide19

Commercially Available Therapies

The Incredible 5-Point Scales by

Kari Baron Dunn

Social Thinking by

Michelle Garcia Winner

Social Stories™ by

Carol Gray

Slide20

The Incredible 5-Point Scale

Define behavior in degrees from least to most

Give the child, parents and teachers knowledge and definitions of behaviors or expectations

Can easily be adapted for home and classroom use

Slide21

Voice Levels

5

OUTSIDE VOICE

- YELLING

4

TEACHER VOICE

- LOUD CLASSROOM VOICE, MANY HEAR

3

SOFT VOICE

- ONLY A FEW HEAR

2

SUPER SOFT VOICE

- OFTEN USED FOR SECRETS, QUIET WHISPER

1

NO VOICE

- SILENT

Slide22

Quantity of Listening & Speaking

5

ONLY TALK (giving speech)

4

MOSTLY TALK, LISTEN SOME

(person in group telling everyone a story)

3

LISTEN AND TALK EQUALLY

(conversation with another person)

2

MOSTLY LISTEN, TALK SOME

(conversation with many)

1

ONLY LISTEN (listening as part of class)

Slide23

Conversational responses

5

MAKE A RELEVANT COMMENT

ASK A RELEVANT QUESTION

4

ASK A RELEVANT QUESTION

3

MAKE A RELEVANT COMMENT

2

ANSWER A QUESTION WITH A SHORT

RESPONSE WITHOUT ELABORATING

1

SAY OR GESTURE

YES, NO,

OR

I DON’T KNOW

Slide24

Detailing the 5-Point Scale

My (Anxiety, Obsession, etc.) Scale

Looks like

Feels like

I can try to

-describe -describe Strategies

behavior, mood or to help

what child

physical child cope

actually symptoms and bring

does down level

Slide25

Other Ideas for Scale Use

Relationships (from best friend to barely an acquaintance)

Emotional/Temper levels (calm to angry)

Range of problems (big to small)

(can be accompanied by feelings and responses)

Levels of politeness (from very rude to very polite)

Slide26

by Michelle Garcia Winner Social Thinking occurs in any environment with more than one person. It involves thinking about what other people think and being aware that people have thoughts about us based on how we act and what we say. When social thinking is learned and valued, positive change in behavior and social skills naturally follow.

Social Thinking

Slide27

I-Laugh

Model of Social Cognition

I- Initiation of Communication

L- Listening with eyes and brain

A- Abstract and inferential language/communication

U- Understanding perspective

G- Gestalt Processing/getting the big picture

H- Humor and Human Relatedness

Slide28

Superflex and the Unthinkables

Rock Brain

Wasfunnyonce

Grumpy-

grumpininny

Worry Wall

 Space Invader Brain eater

One Sided Sid Hyper

Harey

Body Snatcher

Unwonderer

D.O.F. Destroyer of Fun Glassman

Topic Twister Meister Mean Jean

Slide29

Social Behavior Mapping

Behaviors that are expected

Context: (example: coming into classroom)

Expected How they Consequences How you

Behaviors make others you feel about

feel: experience: yourself:

(example) (example) (example) (example)

Look at respected a smile friendly

classmate good a greeting happy

Say “Hi” liked a short chat

confident

Slide30

Social Behavior Mapping

Behaviors that are unexpected

Context: (example: coming into classroom)

Unexpected How

they Consequences How you

Behaviors make others you feel about

feel: experience: yourself:

(example) (example) (example) (example)

Look at disregarded being ignored unconfident

book

in

making

Don’t look unimportant being left out friends

at others

Ignore peers

unliked

being alone lonely

when they greet you

Slide31

Social Stories™ by Carol Gray

The Rationale: the ASD child needs to be taught social understanding (that other children glean naturally) so s/he will know what to do in social settings.The Why: If written and used as described, Social Stories can be very effective and yield results in a short amount of time.

.

Slide32

What is a Social Story™?

A Social

Story™ accurately

describes a situation, skill, or concept according to

specified

criteria.

Slide33

Criteria- ONE GOAL

The

goal of a Social Story™ is to share accurate information using a format,

voice

, and content that is descriptive, meaningful, and physically, socially and emotionally safe for its audience. Every Social Story™ has an overall patient and supportive quality.

Used wit written permission from Carol Gray, 2012

Slide34

TThink About the Goal

Is the goal of a

Social Story™

to

change behavior

?

Used with written permission from Carol Gray 2012

Slide35

Which Meets Goal?

Slide36

Story #1 or Story #2

My mom and dad try to keep me

safe

. That is why sometimes they need to hold

my

hand. They will take my hand. They may

say

,

Hand, please!

I will try to hold hands to stay safe. This is important.

Used with written permission from Carol Gray, 2012

Slide37

My mom and dad tell me when its time to hold hands. If I whine or pull away, it makes it hard for mom and dad. So, I will do a good job holding hands. Used with written permission from Carol Gray, 2012

Or this…

Slide38

1.

5.

3

Used with written permission from Carol Gray, 2012

Slide39

Voice and Vocabulary

Perspective is important- Only use first- person pronouns (I, me, my, mine) and/or third person pronouns (they, them, their, he, his , him, she, her, hers, )

Avoid use of “you” and “your.”

Sometimes good to start in the third person and end in the first person.

Slide40

Voice and Vocabulary (c0ntinued)

Maintain a positive and patient tone

Past, present and future can all be part of

a

single story. (don’t have to be)

There should be no difference between literal and stated meaning

Accurate vocabulary is of vital

importance

Slide41

You just need to

walk outside when thealarm goes off.

Some children like

to eat potato chips.

I am learning totie my shoes.

You will likerecess someday.

Some children like

to go outside to recess.

TAKE IT or

TRASH IT?

Slide42

Suggested Books and Resources

The New Social Story Book and other publications by Carol Gray (available at book sales at this conference)

The Incredible 5-Point Scale and other publications by Kari Dunn Baron

Social Behavior Mapping,

Superflex

and the team of

Unthinkables

, You are a Social Detective, by Michelle Garcia Winner

www.socialthinking.com

Yogarilla

Exercises and Activities

Available through Amazon.com

Slide43

For More Ideas…

Learningtobesocial.com

Contact information:

learningtobesocial@gmail.com

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