Chapter 5 Persecution of Christians - PowerPoint Presentation

Chapter 5 Persecution of Christians
Chapter 5 Persecution of Christians

Chapter 5 Persecution of Christians - Description


Questions to be addressed in this chapter Why were Christians persecuted in the early centuries after Christ How did Christians understand martyrdom How did the doctrine of the Church develop in response to the problem of apostasy ID: 731077 Download Presentation

Tags

martyrdom christians christ persecution christians martyrdom persecution christ church romans god epistle stood roman empire acknowledge centuries early values

Download Section

Please download the presentation from below link :


Download Presentation - The PPT/PDF document "Chapter 5 Persecution of Christians" is the property of its rightful owner. Permission is granted to download and print the materials on this web site for personal, non-commercial use only, and to display it on your personal computer provided you do not modify the materials and that you retain all copyright notices contained in the materials. By downloading content from our website, you accept the terms of this agreement.

Embed / Share - Chapter 5 Persecution of Christians


Presentation on theme: "Chapter 5 Persecution of Christians"— Presentation transcript


Slide1

Chapter 5

Persecution of ChristiansSlide2

Questions to be addressed in this chapter

Why were Christians persecuted in the early centuries after Christ?

How did Christians understand martyrdom?

How did the doctrine of the Church develop in response to the problem of apostasy?

What happened to the apocalyptic tendencies of the early Christians?Slide3

Persecution of Christians

The Romans had a list of officially approved gods, and the Christians would not acknowledge any of

them.

This

made them atheists in the eyes of Romans, and thus they were considered to be a direct threat to the unity of the state.

Christians stood out in Roman culture and were hated because of their beliefs, practices and values.Slide4

Martyrdom

The attitude taken toward martyrdom by the Christians of the first few centuries was a conscious continuation of the attitudes of Jesus and Paul.

Jesus

said that he would acknowledge before God those who acknowledge him before men, but disown those who disowned him before men (Matthew 10:32-33

).

The

Apostle Paul said, “We are heirs—heirs of God and co-heirs with Christ, if indeed we share in his sufferings in order that we may also share in his glory” (Romans 8:17

).

After

the Church had endured a couple of centuries of persecution, Origen would call martyrdom the “cup of salvation” and see it as the most perfect gift that a person could give back to God for all that was done for him or her.Slide5

The Apostolic Fathers

The

Epistles of Clement of

Rome

The

Didache

The

Epistles of Ignatius of Antioch

The

Epistle of

Polycarp

Writings

of

Papias

of

Hierapolis

The

Epistle of

Barnabas

The

Shepherd of

Hermias

The

Epistle to

DiognetusSlide6

Apostasy and the Church

In many of the accounts we have of martyrs who stood firm in their commitment to Christ and suffered the ultimate punishment, it is also mentioned that there were Christians who did not remain true to their faith.

The

“confessors” (those who did remain true) wrestled with what to do with these “lapsed

Christians.”

This

crisis reached its peak after the most systematic and comprehensive persecution the Empire had seen during the reign of Emperor Decius in 250 and 251

.

Decius pledged to restore Rome to its traditional values, and in January of

250

issued an edict that required everyone in the Empire to sacrifice to Jupiter and the other Roman gods for the good of the Empire.Slide7

Eschatology

It

might be claimed that all of Christian thought in the first few generations had at its basis the apocalyptic vision of a soon returning messiah

.

The

Montanists

were

just one

group of early Christians whose thought was organized explicitly around the expectation of the imminent return of Christ.

But as the years went on and the

Parousia

continued to be delayed, the Church needed an organizational structure to survive from generation to generation.Slide8

Summary of main points

1. Christian beliefs, practices, and values stood at odds with Roman culture; this created significant tension and led to persecution.

Martyrdom was believed by many to be the perfect imitation of Christ.

3. Membership in the Church—not belief or faith—determined one’s eligibility for salvation.

The “already, not yet” eschatological attitude developed in response to the delayed

Parousia

.

Shom More....