Good Room/Bad Room Take out a clean sheet of paper. Title it “Good Room, Bad Room” Notes. PowerPoint Presentation

Good Room/Bad Room Take out a clean sheet of paper. Title it “Good Room, Bad Room” Notes. PowerPoint Presentation

2018-03-19 47K 47 0 0

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Take EVERYTHING OFF YOUR DESK aside from the paper and something to write with. . Two Columns- Good Room/Bad Room. Where do these symbols/images come from?. The Puritans. Overview. 16. th. Century. More extreme Protestants within the church of England . ID: 656717

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Presentations text content in Good Room/Bad Room Take out a clean sheet of paper. Title it “Good Room, Bad Room” Notes.

Slide1

Good Room/Bad Room

Take out a clean sheet of paper. Title it “Good Room, Bad Room” Notes.

Take EVERYTHING OFF YOUR DESK aside from the paper and something to write with.

Two Columns- Good Room/Bad Room

Slide2

Where do these symbols/images come from?

Slide3

The Puritans

Slide4

Overview

16

th

Century

More extreme Protestants within the church of England

Wanted to “purify” their national church by eliminating every shred of Catholic influence.

James 1 (King 1603)

Puritans asked to grant reforms- he said NO way!

Charles 1 (1660): failed attempt to rule without Parliament; civil war

Slide5

4 Convictions

Personal salvation was entirely from god

The Bible provided the indispensible guide to life

Church should reflect the express teaching of scripture

That society was one unified whole

Slide6

English Puritanism

Known at first for their critical attitude regarding religious compromise made during reign of Elizabeth 1.

Encouraged:

Direct personal religious experience

Sincere moral code

Simple worship services

Christianity should be taken as the focus of human existence

ACT OF UNIFORMITY (1662)

English Puritans expelled from church; considered non-conformists

Slide7

American Puritanism

17

th

Century Puritan groups separated from the church (among these were the Pilgrims who in 1620 founded Plymouth Colony)

10 years later= first large Puritan migration

Richard Mather and John Cotton- Massachusetts Bay

Mainstream

Calvanistic

thought: Stressed personal religious experiences as “God’s elect”

Slide8

Separation from the Church of England

17

th

Century

Emigrated to the new world

Founded a holy commonwealth

Remained dominant in New England into the 19

th

century

Slide9

Strict and Rigid Puritan

Code

Slide10

Beliefs

Depravity

Unconditional Election; God “saves” those he wishes

Limited atonement: Jesus died for the chosen

Expected to work hard and repress emotions

No tolerance for individual difference

All sins should be punished

God’s Will

Followers of Satan were witches (social outcasts)

Slide11

DUALITY

Devil was as real as God

Evil versus Good

Dark versus Light

Individualism versus Conformity

Slide12

Salem Witch Trials

Slide13

Facts on Salem Trials

Over 150 people (78% women) were accused of witchcraft in Salem, Massachusetts, 1692.

19 people were hanged (14 women and 5 men), and one man was pressed to death because he would not say whether he was guilty or innocent.

Nobody was burned at Salem, but they did burn “witches” in Europe.

Evidence used against suspected witches to prove they were on the devil’s side: accused of harming animals, making people sick, pinching people as they slept, unladylike behavior (yelling at their husbands in public).

Slide14

Nathaniel Hawthorne

1804-1864 Salem, Mass.

One of Hawthorne’s ancestors were among the judges of Salem Witch Trials (only judge to not repent his actions)

Hawthorne was not a Puritan!!!

He looked with distaste upon “the whole dismal severity of the Puritan code of law”.

Transcendental reformer

He called his stories “moral allegories of the heart”; deep psychological complexity, Puritan influence.

Slide15

Sources

Puritain Beliefs: http://sunburst.usd.edu/~jdudley/241/basic_puritan_beliefs.htm

Salem Facts: Elizabeth Reis Author of

Damned Women: Sinners and Witches in Puritan New England

Henry Warner Bowden

Slide16

Reminders

HW: CAREFULLY READ “The

Young Goodman Brown”

Sign Up for IB conferences

Sign up for “American Voices” Presentation

Turn in American Voices packets

Erase all marks you made

Keep if you signed up for presentations


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