Chickering’s Theory of Identity Development
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Chickering’s Theory of Identity Development

Zachery Holder. SAE 723. Dr. Baumann. Authur. . Chickering. Erikson’s . Theory (identity and intimacy) . Education . and Identity (1969). based . on research he conducted at Goddard . College and Small College.

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Chickering’s Theory of Identity Development




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Presentation on theme: "Chickering’s Theory of Identity Development"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

Chickering’s Theory of Identity Development

Zachery Holder

SAE 723

Dr. Baumann

Slide2

Authur Chickering

Erikson’s

Theory (identity and intimacy)

Education

and Identity (1969)

based

on research he conducted at Goddard

College and Small College

Identity

Linda

Reisser

(1993)

Slide3

Psychosocial Theory

Examines the content of development

Break down issues people face as the move through life

Influenced by the environmental context in which development occurs

Slide4

Chickering’s Theory

Seven vectors of development

because each seems to have direction and magnitude -- even though the direction maybe expressed more appropriately by a spiral or by steps than by a straight line.”

Vectors build on each other accounting for emotional, interpersonal, ethical, and intellectual aspects of development.

Vectors depend largely on social

norms

Slide5

Developing Competence

Intellectual competence: developing knowledge and skills related to particular subject mater

Physical competence: developed through physical productivity

Interpersonal

competence: the development of understanding, communicating, and interacting with others.

Slide6

Vector Application

Describe a time when you remember developing intellectual, physical, or interpersonal confidence.

What

specific ability was enhanced

?

What supported

your development?

Slide7

Managing Emotions

Recognize

and

accept your own emotions

Appropriately express and control

the emotions

Slide8

Vector Application

Think of a time you most recently failed to manage your emotions?

How

would this effect those who work with or for you?

Slide9

Moving Through Autonomy Toward Interdependence

Increase

emotional freedom

Emotional Independence

Emotional

independence means freedom from continual and pressing needs for reassurance, affection, or approval

.

Instrumental

Independence

the

ability to organize activities and to solve problems in a self-directed way, and the ability to

navigate from place to place

Interdependence

having the awareness that others are connected to the individuals actions

Slide10

Vector Application

Describe a time when you became more independent and understood the value of being interdependent.

Who

supported you in this process?

Slide11

Developing Mature Interpersonal

Relationships

Interpersonal and intercultural tolerance

A

ppreciate differences

Create

healthy intimate relationships

More reciprocal and

empathetic of others

Slide12

Vector Application

What is

another culture

, religion, life style, etc. that you are interested in

?

How has that helped you establish relationships with someone who’s identity reflects those differences?

Slide13

Establishing Identity

Acknowledge differences in identity development

gender

, ethnic background,

and sexual

orientation

Identity formation depends in part on the other

vectors

External factors from family and cultural

background

Slide14

Vector Application

Reflecting on your own experiences and sense of identity what identity do you feel the most positive about and how has it helped to establish your other identities?

Slide15

Developing Purpose

Career goals

C

ommitments

to personal interest or activities

S

trong

interpersonal commitments

Slide16

Vector Application

What gives you a sense of purpose personally and professionally?

Has

that had an impact on your career choice?

What

is something else that gives you a sense of purpose

?

Have you explored them as well?

Slide17

Developing Integrity

Humanize and personalize values

Develop

congruence

Slide18

Vector Application

Do you remember a time when your moral beliefs were challenged?

How

did you work through this

?

Is there a time you have failed to hold to your own morals?

Slide19

Environmental Influences

Key influences:

seven

factors from educational environments

Institutional Objectives

Clear and specific objectives

Mission Statements

Key To

Success:

personnel

pay attention and use to guide the development of programs and services

Slide20

Environmental Influences

Institutional Size

Significant participation is important for development

Numbers of opportunities is not always the issue

Key to

Success:

Having

enough meaningful opportunities for

involvement.

Guiding students to sometimes focus on specific involvements

Student-Faculty Relationships

Extensive and varied interactions

Students need to see faculty in a variety of situations involving different roles

Key to Success:

Knowing who your students are and understanding how they interact and communicate

Helping them relate to you on a personal level, to understand you are a person too

Slide21

Environmental Influences

Curriculum

Relevant Curriculum

Sensitive to Individual differences

Offers diverse perspectives

Making sure students can make sense of material

Key to Success:

Recognize differences, create opportunities to challenge perspectives, and Provide activities to integrate differences.

Teaching

Active learning,

student-faculty

interactions, timely feedback, high expectations, and respect for individual differences.

Slide22

Environmental Influences

Friendships and Student Communities

“A student’s most important teacher is often another student”

Key to Success:

Encourage interactions between students, offer opportunities to collaborate, include people of diverse backgrounds, and serve as a reference.  

Student Development Programs and Services

Collaboration between academics and student affairs professionals

Key to Success:

focus on “ the education of the whole student”

Slide23

Three Admonitions

Helpful in making sure the key influences are a success

Integration

of Work and Learning

Recognition

and Respect for Individual Differences

Acknowledgment

of the Cyclical Nature of Learning and Development

Slide24

Assessment

Development is a continues process and a number of things factor into the ways in which a person develops

Cognitive Development

individuals

at a different level of cognitive development will interpret experiences differently

Factor in internal and external factors when applying

Slide25

Specific Student Populations

Women vs. Men

How do the different genders effect interactions within the vectors?

Racial/Ethnic

Groups

African Americans

Other Races?

LGBT Students

Sexual Identity may make it

difficult for individuals to

have development

within

other vectors

Slide26

Application and Critique:

Programming and evaluation of programs

Individual Interactions

Critique: Not

all student populations are represented or understood when

applying

this

theory

Environmental Interventions

Slide27

FOOD FOR THOUGHT

We may not know for years that a single lecture or conversation or experience started a chain reaction that transformed some aspect of ourselves. We cannot easily discern what subtle mix of people, books, settings, or events promotes growth.” Arthur

Chickering

Slide28

References

Alessandria

, K. P., & Nelson, E. S. (2005). Identity development and

self-esteem

of first-generation American college students: an

exploratory

study.

Journal of College Student Development

, 46(1),

3-12

. doi:10.1353/csd.2005.0001

Chickering

, A. (

n.d.

). Seven vectors: An overview. Cabrini College.

Retrieved

from

http

://

www.cabrini.edu/communications/ProfDev/cardevChickering.html

Evans, N. J., Forney, D. S., Guido, F. M., Patton, L. D., &

Renn

, K. A.

(

2010).

Chickering’s

theory of identity development.

Student

development

in college: Theory, research, and practice

(2nd ed.,

pp

. 64-81). San Francisco, CA: John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

Foubert

, J., Nixon, M. L., Sisson, V. S., & Barnes, A. C. (2005). A

longitudinal

study

of

Chickering

and

Reisser's

vectors:

Exploring gender

differences and implications for refining the

theory

. Journal

of

College Student Development

, 46(5),

461-471. doi:10.1353/csd.2005.0047