Welcome Back to the Fort: PowerPoint Presentation, PPT - DocSlides

Welcome Back to the Fort: PowerPoint Presentation, PPT - DocSlides

2017-10-04 44K 44 0 0

Description

A Study of Community. Welcome Back to the Fort: . A Study of Community. Experience . Introduction. Enrichment. Projects. About Us. IFW Donors. Outline. . I. Experience . . 1. Ripley Arnold’s Birthday Party. ID: 592986

Direct Link: Embed code:

Download this presentation

DownloadNote - The PPT/PDF document "Welcome Back to the Fort:" is the property of its rightful owner. Permission is granted to download and print the materials on this web site for personal, non-commercial use only, and to display it on your personal computer provided you do not modify the materials and that you retain all copyright notices contained in the materials. By downloading content from our website, you accept the terms of this agreement.

Presentations text content in Welcome Back to the Fort:

Slide1

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Slide2

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Outline

I. Experience

1. Ripley Arnold’s Birthday Party

2. Meet our invited guests (partners)

II. Introduction

1. The founding of Fort Worth

2. A study of community (FWISD Alignment)

III. Enrichment

1. The Masons and Education

2. The first family of Fort Worth: Jane and “Press” Farmers

3. Business at the Fort

4. Clothing of the Era

5. Children of the Day

6. What made a good Fort

S

ite

7. Native American knowledge in the Forts Era

8. Hardships at the Fort

9. Culture and Music at the Fort

IV. Projects

1. Caps of the Era

2. String Art and Storytelling

*All IFW programs are TEKS aligned

Slide3

Experience: You are cordially invited to attend Major Ripley Arnold’s Birthday Party! January 17, 1850

Get ready to be transported to the early days at the Fort. Come early as we make preparations for Major Arnold’s surprise party. Major Arnold and his Delaware Indian Scout John Lewis are coming in from Fort Graham and are expected back at the fort any time now.

Welcome Back to

the Fort: A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide4

Experience: Who are you going to meet? The Masons: Bob Holmes will tell you about many of Fort Worth’s founding fathers who were Masons. Clara Ruddell will introduce you to “Mason”, the beloved Masonic Bell, and its importance. Community Around the Fort: Log Cabin Village will show what it took to keep the fort in shape.

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide5

Experience: Who are you going to meet? Early Settlers: Twice Upon a Time Storytellers (Gene and Peggy Helmick-Richardson) will portray George “Press” and Jane Farmer, settlers who were here before the military built the fort. Lone Star Legacy will conduct a workshop highlighting the customary dress and manners of this era.

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide6

Experience: Who are you going to meet? The Military: Company F, 2nd Dragoons and their military duties will be covered by Tim Dersham and students from Calvary Christian Academy. Without the military encampment, Fort Worth may never have become the thriving city it is today.

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide7

Experience: Who are you going to meet? Native Americans: Eddie Sandoval will talk about the role of Native Americans in the area. He will talk about his Native American heritage and what it taught him about nature and ensuring that they utilize everything around them, not wasting anything.

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide8

Experience: Who are you going to meet?  Culture at the Fort: You will learn about the Arnold Familyand others at the fort. A compatriot of Dr. Gouhenant, Madame Collett (Collene Mallette) will be here to teach about music and dance at the fort. The Sawyer Family will be thereas Sophie & Willis Arnold to play music of the era, and local historian Daniel Tatum will play our founder, Major Ripley Arnold.

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide9

Experience: Program Partners & Donors Historic Fort Worth Masonic Temple Fort Worth Museum of Science and HistoryFort Worth ISDFort Worth Junior ROTCLog Cabin VillageTexas Trail of Fame Home Depot – Create your Cap donation

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide10

Living in communities The power of people The places where we liveHow communities grow and change Different types of maps Citizenship in the communityHow and why people gather in community Strength of Spirit How leaders and events shape communitiesCommunity Service Human geography

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Introduction: A Study of CommunityThis event will help fortify the concepts presented in FWISD’s Social Studies pacing guide:

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide11

How geography affects our community. Maps, regions, resources and climate How inventions and technology shape our lives How cultures influence communities Timeline of historical figures We are part of this placeEarly settlers and their “business plans” The bartering systemWhat money is all about; “banking” America at its best: we all contribute & make a difference

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Introduction: A Study of CommunityThis event will help fortify the concepts presented in FWISD’s Social Studies pacing guide:

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide12

Fort Worth was established in June of 1849, just east of the Cross Timbers on a high bluff overlooking the confluence of the Clear Fork and the West Fork of the Trinity River. The Dragoons and their commanding officer Major Ripley Arnold set up the new U.S. Army post as part of a defensive picket to protect new settlements.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Introduction: The founding of Fort Worth

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide13

Arnold named it after his commander, General William Jenkins Worth. What Arnold didn't know was that Worth had died of cholera a few days earlier in San Antonio. Local Indian tribes and hunting groups were received at the camp and trading began.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Introduction: The Founding of Fort Worth

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide14

Introduction: The Dragoons helped to found Fort WorthMajor Arnold took a small party of 2nd Dragoon troopers and proceeded west to a spot near the confluence of the Clear and West forks of the Trinity. There, at the end of May, they planted Old Glory on the future site of Fort Worth. A week later, Arnold was back with his entire command, the 42 men of Company F, 2nd Dragoons. The men set to work building a fort and, by the end of August, they were ready to move in.

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide15

Introduction: The Dragoons helped to found Fort WorthThe Dragoons had a very distinctive uniform. They were essentially mounted infantrymen until the mid 1850s, when they developed the cavalry tactics used during the Civil War. Note the shortened rifle, called a “musketoon,” and the heavy saber. They fought on foot and used their horses mostly as transportation.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide16

Introduction: Do you always believe the press?Read the article about the Dragoons and Ripley Arnold’s reply on the next page.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide17

Introduction: Do you always believe the press?What do you think about the difference in the press account & Arnold’s account?

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide18

Our Masonic forefathers supported the idea of free universal education for the citizenry. Masons were among the pioneers who moved into and developed new areas. One of their first endeavors in a new community was to build a Masonic Lodge. Generally, this was a two-story structure with the ground floor to serve as a schoolroom and the upstairs as the lodge.

Take an online tour of the Historic Fort Worth Masonic Temple :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4_QDG9_8104

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Enrichment: The Masons and Education

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide19

Freemasonry is firmly committed to building a better community and a better world. For these reasons, we feel the nurturing of the leaders of tomorrow's society is vitally necessary! Freemasons must support the public school system. We are depending on our young people for the future, but for the present, we must let them know that they can depend on us!” (Frederick Eby, ‘The Development of Education in Texas’, quoted in James Carter, Education and Masonry in Texas to 1846.)

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Enrichment:

The Masons and Education

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide20

Names of local Masons you might knowCaroll PeakE.M. Daggett Howard Van ZandtJC TerrellJohn Peter Smith

John Peter Smith

Daggett

Terrell Family

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment:

What the Masons did for Fort Worth

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide21

Enrichment: True ImpactTake a look at the history of the Mighty Mites, a group of orphans educated at Fort Worth’s Masonic Home Orphanage who caught the eye of the sporting world: http://www.12mightyorphans.com/mighty-orphans-story.htm

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide22

Enrichment: The Masonic BellIn 1782 this bell was made in London. It came to Fort Worth in 1855 as the property of Lawrence Steele and was placed in the public square. It first hung in the Masonic Hall in 1871. It is now only rung on special occasions.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide23

Enrichment: Poem to Masonic BellOur much loved bell, our Mason bell, Could it but speak true tales ’twould tellOf youth and home, and those old times, When oft we heard your soothing chimes. And so ’till be, when we are gone, That tuneful peal will still ring on;And other craftsmen to brothers tell And speak your praise, sweet Mason Bell.

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide24

Enrichment:

The First Family of Fort Worth Jane and George “Press” Farmer

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

George Preston Farmer (1817-1892) and Jane Woody Farmer (1827-1895) were here before there was a HERE here. In 1849 the couple had been roughing it on the Trinity River, living in a tent after Indians had burned down their log cabin, when Major Ripley Arnold and the Second Dragoons arrived to establish the Fort that would become Fort Worth. The Farmers had pitched their tent right where Arnold wanted to establish the fort, so George became the fort’s sutler (a civilian merchant who sells provisions to an army.)

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide25

George and Jane and daughter Susan were listed in the 1850 census of the fort. After the Army vacated the fort in 1853, George and Jane homesteaded, eventually settling in southeast Fort Worth. George and Jane are buried in Forest Hill Cemetery. Susan Ann Farmer lived into the 1940s. Thus, she witnessed the first ninety years of Fort Worth history, saw Fort Worth’s population grow from her parents and herself to 177,000.

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Enrichment:

The First Family of Fort Worth Jane and George “Press” Farmer

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide26

Present

the story of the earliest “settlers” and the first fort sutlers, Jane and George “Press” Farmer. They will share an account of their experience as area settlers, the burning of their log home by Indians, and the relief they experienced when Major Arnold and the Dragoons first appeared and raised the US 29 star Flag, as promise of a community and protection coming to the area.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment:

Twice Upon a Time Storytellers

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide27

Enrichment: Business at the FortGenerally, the sutlers built their stores within the limits of an army post and first needed to receive a license from the Commander prior to construction. Sutlers, frequently the only local supplier of non-military goods, often developed monopolies on simple commodities like tobacco, coffee, or sugar and rose to a powerful stature. Since government-issued coinage was scarce, sutlers often conducted transactions using a bartering system when money was unavailable.

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide28

Bartering is a system of exchange where goods & services are exchanged for other goods or services without using an official medium of exchange such as money. This was useful on the frontier where official money was hard to come by even at the forts.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment: Bartering Vs. Buying

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide29

American clothing during this period was still very much regional. Immigrants held onto much of their traditional dress. Clothing also denoted social status, and only in America could the poor have the chance to achieve a better life. For these people, clothing was an outward expression of the American dream.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment: Clothing of the Era

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide30

In the untamed American wilderness, things were a bit different. While European settlers took with them a combination of their traditional garb and their new American styles, these types of garments were not always conducive to the untamed terrain and their new living conditions. They had to adapt their clothing to the demands of the region. Many incorporated deerskin, fur, and other types of wilderness materials. Women planted flax from which they made their own fabrics.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment:

Clothing of the Era

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide31

Parents depended on their children to help out. Children’s days would begin at first light. They would go to the well and get water, lay a fire, bring in wood, and boil water. The children would then milk the cows and collect eggs. Without electricity or running water, everyday chores took longer. Doing the laundry might take an entire day.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment: How did children spend their days during this era?

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide32

Children learned to cook, bake, make soap and candles, sew and spin. Young children did household chores together and then around the age of 9 or 10 they started to work in the field - boys and girls. For girls, working alongside boys was a big change. In more settled parts of the country, girls were expected to do only household chores. Girls had freer lives in the West.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment: How did children spend their days during this era?

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide33

Hewing logs for a new flagpoleBringing in extra water on a yokeBaking for the partyMaking party favors

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment:

Chores to get the fort ready

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide34

Strategically located Easily supplied Located on higher ground Protection from floods Protect settlers from Indian attack Areas that fulfilled treaty obligations with Mexico

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment: What made a good fort site?

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide35

Had plentiful resources: water timber stone arable land for farming animal population for hunting available fishing grass for grazing domesticated animals

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment: What made a good fort site?

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide36

5:00 AM Reveille (trumpet) Roll Call6:30 AM Call for breakfast (bread, coffee, bacon or beef)7:00 AM Fatigue Call7:30 AM Routine duties (hauling water, gathering wood, tending to the garden, kitchen duty, building repair, latrine duty)8:30 AM Select Officers for Guard Duty- escorting prisoners, watching for Indian raids, keeping troops in line11:30 AM Lunch Call1:00 PM Return to duties and drills for 2 hours3:00 PM Water break 3:30 PM Sunset, fatigue duties5:30 PM Dinner (beef, bread, coffee)Sunset Evening Dress Parade9:00 PM Taps

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment:

Typical day’s schedule at the fort

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide37

Native AmericansAfrican AmericansFrench SettlersSpanish SettlersMexican SettlersAnglo Settlers

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment:

Who lived in early Fort Worth?

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide38

There were a variety of Plains Indians in the area including the Comanches, Caddos, Anadarkos, Wacos, Tawakonis, Tonkawas, and Wichitas. Their knowledge of the local plants and animals was vital to the survival of all settlers looking to live in this region. They had a strong knowledge of which grasses were best for grazing and what berries were best to eat.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment:

Native Americans on the plains & along the Trinity River

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide39

They also had knowledge of native animals such as bison that played a part in practically every aspect of the lives of Native Americans. Early explorers and pioneers found bison trails to be level and safe passageways, preferring them because they were well packed down and did not lead to swamps or quicksand. In fact, many of our modern roads and interstate highways were once bison trails.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment:

Native Americans on the plains & along the Trinity River

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide40

Frontier families found game plentiful and wild fruits and berries in good supply. Deer, bison, antelope, turkeys, squirrels, ducks, geese, quail, catfish, hogs and prairie chickens furnished a varied diet, along with wild plums, persimmons, grapes and pecans. In the spring, the land was a riot of wildflowers and grasses: daisies, buttercups, bluebonnets and sweet williams, with mockingbirds, blue jays and scissortails among the myriad of birds found in the region.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment: What lived here in the Fort’s times

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide41

Most farmers found wheat a better choice for cultivation than corn because of the climate, although getting either crop ground into flour or meal was a hardship. Often farmers traveled hundreds of miles to the nearest mills.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment: Hardships during the era

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide42

Of all the pests and hazards of frontier life -bears, panthers, wolves, coyotes, foxes, grasshoppers, drought and flood - one of the worst was grasshoppers. Capt. Pope at Fort Belknap in April 1854 reported an army of grasshoppers that filled the tents. In October of the same year, grasshoppers were as thick as a snowstorm in the Fort Chadbourne area: like a Biblical plague, the horde swept through the area for three days straight, one report said.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment: Hardships during this era

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide43

Take a look at the following inventions that changed the lives of those in this era.  Photography =The Daguerreotype was one of the first forms of photography. Louis-Jacques Daguerre invented the daguerreotype process in France in August of 1839. American photographers quickly capitalized on this new invention, that was capable of capturing a; “truthful likeness”. By 1850 it had made its way to Fort Worth.

Welcome Back To The Fort A Study of Community

Enrichment: Inventions can change your life!

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide44

Safety pin =American mechanic Walter Hunt invented the safety pin. Needing to settle a $15 debt with a friend, Hunt decided to invent something new in order to pay off his friend. After being issued a U.S. patent on April 10, 1849, Hunt sold the patent to W.R. Grace & Co. for $400. Hunt then paid what he owed to a friend and kept the rest for himself. In the years to follow, W.R. Grace & Co. would make millions of dollars in profits from his invention.

Welcome Back To The Fort A Study of Community

Enrichment: Inventions can change your life!

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide45

Greeting cards= The custom of sending greeting cards can be traced back to ancient times. By the early 1400s, handmade paper greeting cards were being exchanged in Europe. By the 1850s, the greeting card had been transformed from an expensive to an affordable means of communication, due largely to advances in printing and mechanization, as well as the 1840 introduction of the postage stamp. Another great invention involving a greeting card can be seen on the next page, can you guess what it is?

Welcome Back To The Fort A Study of Community

Enrichment: Inventions can change your life!

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide46

The tradition of celebrating a person’s birthday with a birthday cake & lit candles originated in 1746 when Count Ludwig von Zinzendorf celebrated his birthday. Prior to 1850 in the United States, the observance of birthdays was not a universal tradition as it is today.  This would have been a new way to celebrate at the time of Ripley Arnold’s 33rd birthday. This is a traditional recipe from a 1849 volume of The Modern Housewife, a classic Victorian cookbook that Mrs. Arnold may have used.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment: Birthday Cake

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide47

Put one pound of butter into an earthen pan with a pound of powdered sugar, and a little grated nutmeg. Beat them well together with the hand until forming a smooth lightish cream, then add by degrees eight eggs, beating the mixture for ten minutes after. Add a pound and a quarter of sifted flour, stir it in lightly, and put the mixture into hoops to bake.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment: Recipe for Pound Cake circa 1850

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide48

Ripley Arnold’s wife Kate was a woman of culture who frequently traveled with her children between Washington D.C. and her husband’s outposts like Fort Worth. She and her children brought culture to the early days at the fort.Another of the areas cultured inhabitants was Dr. Adolphus F. Gouhenant, a French exile who immigrated to Texas in 1848. He was a member of the short-lived Icarian colony. After the colony disbanded, he came to Fort Worth, where he became friends with Major Ripley Arnold and his wife, Kate.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment: Culture at the fort

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide49

A renaissance man, Gouhenant's knowledge of art, music, languages, daguerreotypes (early photography) and wine making made him a popular figure in the pioneer communities. In the early 1850’s, Gouhenant opened a studio in Dallas called "The Art Saloon Gallery." There, he displayed his paintings and entertained his friends and neighbors.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment: Culture at the fort

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide50

There were various types of music at the fort- some people preferred classical music, others folk music. Folk music was the popular form of music of the day and often followed immigrants from their native countries (such as Scottish Reels) while classical music was considered the more cultured of the two. Both used similar instruments: piano, violin (fiddle) and mandolin. Instruments like the harmonica and guitar were also common.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Enrichment:

Music at the fort

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide51

Links to Classical http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gGQLc4j9Hykhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oD7TtE81gGA Links to Folk Music http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hbxup7NBQoEhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4fvpKs1WrnI

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Enrichment:

The Sawyer Family will perform both classical and folk music of the era. Which do you prefer?

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide52

Enrichment: Ripley Arnold - Composer?When Ripley Arnold attended West Point Military Academy he co-wrote a song still sung at the academy today: “Benny Havens, Oh!”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybITKklvmL0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tDFfLA7tNzk

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide53

http://www.amazon.com/Fort-that-Became-City-Reconstruction/dp/0875651461/ref=cm_wl_huc_item

http://www.amazon.com/Fort-Worth-A-Frontier-Triumph/dp/0875652026/ref=pd_sim_b_4

http://www.amazon.com/Fort-Worth-Clay-Perkins/dp/1930566107/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1377745636&sr=1-1&keywords=the+worth+in+fort+worth+clay+perkins

http://www.amazon.com/Soldiers-Sutlers-And-Settlers-Garrison/dp/1585440647/ref=sr_1_sc_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1377745746&sr=1-1-spell&keywords=soldiers+settlers+and+suttlers+robert+wooster

http://www.amazon.com/Twelve-Mighty-Orphans-Inspiring-Football/dp/0312384874/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1377745979&sr=1-1&keywords=jim+dent+12+mighty+orphans

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Enrichment: Want to know more about the early days of Fort Worth? Check out these resources.

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide54

Project: Games: Telling Stories With StringString figures and string stories have been around for almost as long as people have been on earth. For example, the Navajo used string figures as a way to memorize the patterns involved in weaving and sand painting.

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide55

Project: Games: Telling Stories With StringWhen children create string figures, they are exercising their powers of concentration and coordination and creating paths of muscular memory. A sturdy twine or nylon cord is excellent for this game. Here is a link to making string stories: http://www.kidspot.com.au/kids-activities-and-games/String-games+33/Cats-cradle-string-game+11989.htm

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide56

Project: Types of hats worn in this era. Prairie Bonnet Coonskin Cap Military Cap

C

reate

one of these hats & wear it to the event!

Welcome Back to the Fort:

A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide57

Project:

Hat making instructions

To make a Prairie

Bonnet, wear your hat back on your head so that the bill is turned upwards and decorate it with flowers, gingham or plaid. To make a Coonskin Cap, turn the hat backwards and decorate it like an animal skin with a tail at the back. To make a Military Cap, wear the cap as it would normally be worn and decorate it with military insignias and buttons.

Welcome Back to the Fort: A Study of Community

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide58

About Us: Imagination Fort WorthImagination Fort Worth sparks the imaginations of Texas kids through transformational experiences. Over the past 25 years, more than five million students have participated in our programs—programs that combine the creative thrill of the arts with the critical educational goals outlined by local and state guidelines. Through art, dance, music, and theater, students engage with history, science, math, and language in ways that enhance learning and awaken creativity.  

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide59

About Us: Imagination Fort WorthImagination Fort Worth is an independent non-profit organization. We partner with local schools to create field trips and in-school programs that target specific educational needs, as well as with local arts and cultural institutions to introduce students to a diversity of mind-opening experiences.Visit us at: http://imaginationfortworth.org/  

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide60

Imagination Fort Worth would like to thank the following for their continued support.

Armstrong FoundationArts Council of Fort Worth and Tarrant CountyARTS Council NortheastBates ContainerBen E. KeithBirdies for CharityAmon G Carter FoundationCity of Fort WorthColonial Country Club CharityCommunity Foundation of North TexasCommunities Foundation of TexasDallas Hearing FoundationDeaf Action CenterFash FoundationFifth Avenue FoundationFort Worth Convention and Visitors BureauFrost BankGarvey Texas FoundationEdith Winther Grace Charitable TrustHired Hands, Inc.Mary Potishman Lard Trust

Edward and Ellison Lasater TrustMollie and Garland Lasater Charitable TrustLivingston Hearing Aid Centers, Inc.Gary Patterson FoundationRhodes Charitable TrustRosenthal Charitable TrustRotary Club of Fort WorthRozell Sprayer Manufacturing CompanyRyan FoundationWilliam E. Scott FoundationSertoma Club of Fort WorthSid W Richardson FoundationHelen Gertrude Sparks TrustStarkey Hearing FoundationTexas Association of Parents & Educators of the DeafTexas Commission for the ArtsTexas Education AgencyTexas InstrumentsTexas Women for the ArtsTyler Metro Association for the DeafA Special Thanks to our Individual Donors

http://icfw.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Arts-Council-of-Fort-Worth-Donor-List.pdf

Experience

Introduction

Enrichment

Projects

About Us

IFW Donors

Slide61

Hope you enjoy your trip back in time to the original Fort Worth!


About DocSlides
DocSlides allows users to easily upload and share presentations, PDF documents, and images.Share your documents with the world , watch,share and upload any time you want. How can you benefit from using DocSlides? DocSlides consists documents from individuals and organizations on topics ranging from technology and business to travel, health, and education. Find and search for what interests you, and learn from people and more. You can also download DocSlides to read or reference later.