Section 15.3: Slavery Dominates Politics

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Section 15.3: Slavery Dominates Politics




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Presentations text content in Section 15.3: Slavery Dominates Politics

Slide1

Section

15.3: Slavery Dominates Politics

Today’s Essential Question: How did slavery dominate national events after 1855?

Slide2

Vocabulary Republican Party

– political party formed in 1854 to oppose slaveryunconstitutional – illegal because it violates the Constitutionarsenal

– place where weapons are

stored

Slide3

Check for Understanding

What is today’s Essential Question?How have the goals of the Republican Party changed over time?What

does it mean if the Supreme Court declares a law unconstitutional

?

Why would someone break into an arsenal

?

Slide4

What We Already Know

Although the

Whigs and Democrats were the two major political parties of the

1850s, there were other parties as well, such as the Know-Nothings.

Slide5

What We Already Know

After the failure of the Wilmot Proviso to ban slavery in the Mexican Cession, the Free Soil Party was formed to stop the spread of slavery into new territories.

Slide6

What We Already Know

The Kansas-Nebraska Act led to widespread violence on the plains in 1854.

Slide7

The Republican Party Forms

Created out of the problems caused by the Kansas–Nebraska Act The Whig Party split; Northern Whigs joined Free Soilers and other slavery opponentsGained strength in the North as the Democrats were blamed for the violence in Kansas.

Slide8

Get your whiteboards and markers ready!

Slide9

What was the Republican Party’s main goal?

To end slavery everywhere in America

To return all blacks to Africa

To stop the spread of slavery into the territories

To bring Canada and Mexico into the United States

Slide10

17. What issues led to the creation of the Republican Party?

Choose all that are true!

Slide11

17. What issues led to the creation of the Republican Party?

Northern Whigs leaving their party to join with other opponents of slaveryOpposition by James Buchanan to the Wilmot Proviso

The emergence of Abraham Lincoln

Problems caused by the Kansas Nebraska Act

Choose all that are true!

Slide12

Republican Candidate John C. Frémont

First Republican presidential nomineeYoung, handsome, national hero for his explorations in the WestFavored admitting both California and Kansas as free states. Had no controversial record to defend.

Slide13

The Election of 1856

Democrat nominee James Buchanan had taken no stand on the Kansas–Nebraska Act. Buchanan said little about slavery; his goal was to maintain the Union.He appealed to Southerners, the border states, and Northerners who were fearful of a civil war.

Slide14

The Election of 1856

The Know-Nothing Party nominated former president Millard Fillmore (1850-53), but were divided over slavery.

Slide15

The Election of 1856

Election results showed how strong the Republican Party was in the North, and that the nation was sharply split over slavery.

Slide16

Get your whiteboards and markers ready!

Slide17

Which of the following was NOT a candidate in the 1856 presidential election?

Douglas of the Free Soil PartyFremont of the Republican Party

Buchanan of the Democratic Party

Fillmore of the Know-Nothing Party

Slide18

What did the election results in 1856 reveal?

Party differences were less sharply defined that in earlier elections.The influence of the Republican Party was declining in the North.The influence of the Democratic Party was declining in the South.

The nation was sharply split over slavery.

Slide19

The Case of Dred Scott

Dred Scott was a slave whose owner took him to live in free territories, then returned to Missouri, a slave state.

After his owner’s death, Scott sued for his freedom, but the Supreme Court ruled against him.

Slide20

Chief Justice Taney‘s Ruling

As a Negro, Scott was not a U.S. citizen and could not sue in U.S courts.

Slaveholders’ property rights were protected by the Fifth Amendment.

Congress could not ban slavery anywhere, including the territories.

Slide21

Chief Justice Roger Taney‘s Ruling

This decision made the Missouri Compromise unconstitutional.

Southerners cheered the Court’s decision, while Many Northerners were outraged, but powerless.

Slide22

Get your whiteboards and markers ready!

Slide23

18. What was the Supreme Court ruling in the Dred Scott case?

Choose all that are true!

As a slave, Dred Scott was not a U.S. citizen.

Only Congress could restrict the movement of slaves into the territories.

Dred Scott was no longer a slave.

Slave-owners could take their slaves everywhere, including free states and territories.

The Missouri Compromise was unconstitutional.

Slide24

What consequences did the Dred Scott decision have for free blacks?

Slide25

Lincoln-Douglas Debates (1858)

The Dred Scott decision angered Republicans.

They claimed that Democrats wanted to open up the whole country to slavery.

They planned to use this argument to challenge Stephen Douglas and other Democrats in the 1858 elections.

Slide26

Lincoln-Douglas Debates (1858)

Abraham Lincoln was nominated by Illinois Republicans to run against Douglas for his U.S. Senate seat.In his first campaign speech, Lincoln expressed Republican fears that Democrats threatened to expand slavery across the whole country.

Slide27

Lincoln-Douglas Debates (1858)

Lincoln warned, “A house divided against itself cannot stand. I believe this government cannot endure, permanently half slave and half free. I do not expect the Union to be dissolved—I do not expect the house to fall—but I do expect it will cease to be divided. It will become all one thing, or all the other.”

Slide28

Lincoln and Douglas Debates (1858)

Lincoln called slavery was “a moral, a social and a political wrong,” but did not suggest abolishing slavery where it already existed, only that it should not be expanded.

Douglas argued for popular sovereignty as the most democratic method to do deal with slavery.

Both men believed in the superiority of whites over Negroes.

Slide29

Lincoln: ‘I have no purpose to interfere with slavery in the states where it already exists. I have no lawful right to do so, and I have no desire to do so.’‘I have no intention of introducing political and social equality between the races. Their differences make it impossible to for them ever to live together as

equals, and therefore I am in favor of my race having the upper position.’

Lincoln and Douglas Debates (1858)

Slide30

Lincoln-Douglas Debates (1858)

‘But the Negro is just as entitled to the rights mentioned in the Declaration of Independence as the white man.’‘The Negro is not my equal in color, and perhaps not in moral and intellectual development.’‘But in the right to eat the bread his labor produces

without

asking anyone else’s permission, he is

my

equal,

and

the equal of Sen. Douglas, and the equal of every man .’

Slide31

Lincoln and Douglas Debates (1858)

Douglas won reelection, but Lincoln became a national figure and a leader in the Republican Party.

Slide32

Get your whiteboards and markers ready!

Slide33

19. What was the main issue in the Lincoln–Douglas debates?

the Dred Scott rulingSouth Carolina's decision to secedeslavery in the territories

the trial of John Brown

Slide34

In 1859, John Brown planned to capture the U.S. arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia, and use its weapons to start a slave uprising across the South.

John Brown Attacks Harpers Ferry

Slide35

Brown’s group captured the arsenal, but no slaves joined the fight.

John Brown Attacks Harpers Ferry

Slide36

The U.S. Marines captured Brown and six

others,

and ten men were killed.

John Brown Attacks Harpers Ferry

Slide37

In 1859, John Brown planned to capture the U.S. arsenal at Harpers Ferry, Virginia, and use its weapons to start a slave uprising across the South.

Brown’s group captured the arsenal, but no slaves joined the fight.

The U.S. Marines captured Brown and six others were captured, and ten men were killed.

John Brown Attacks Harpers Ferry

Brown was tried and convicted for murder and treason, and was hanged.

Slide38

Reaction to John Brown and Harpers Ferry

In the North, abolitionists mourned Brown’s death and called him a hero.Southerners were enraged by Brown’s actions and horrified by Northerners’ sympathetic reactions to his death.With the election of 1860 drawing near, the issue of slavery had raised sectional tensions to the breaking point.

Slide39

Get your whiteboards and markers ready!

Slide40

20. Why did John Brown attack the arsenal at Harpers Ferry?

Choose all that are true!

To seize the U.S. arsenal located there

To call public attention to "Bleeding Kansas”

To arm slaves with captured weapons

To start a slave uprising

To get weapons for South Carolina’s militia

Slide41

21. How did John Brown’s attack on Harper’s Ferry increase tensions between the North and the South?

Choose all that are true!

Southerners were enraged by Brown's actions.

Northerners were horrified by Southern tributes honoring Brown.

Southerners were horrified by Northern tributes honoring Brown.

Some Northerners made a hero out of Brown for his actions against slavery.

Some Southerners praised Brown for his violence against abolitionists.


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