The Growth - PowerPoint Presentation

The Growth
The Growth

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Of Presidential Power Ch 14 Section 1 httpswwwyoutubecomwatchvv6X28byZZbI Why Presidential Power Has Grown Over the course of American history the championsdefenders of a stronger presidency have almost always prevailed ID: 599576 Download Presentation

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Slide1

The Growth Of Presidential Power

Ch 14 Section 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v6X28byZZbI

Slide2

Why Presidential Power Has GrownOver the course of American history, the champions/defenders of a stronger presidency have almost always prevailed.The nation’s increasingly/growing complex social & economic life has also influenced the growth of presidential power.By passing laws & expanding the role of the Federal Government, Congress has increased presidential power.The ability to use the mass media (TV, Newspaper, now Internet)

as every President since Franklin D. Roosevelt has, aids in gathering and holding public attention.Slide3

A Short History of the Imperial PresidencySlide4

A Short History of the Imperial Presidency: President Bush's attempt to obtain increased wartime powers represent a troubling challenge to American civil liberties. But the challenge is not unprecedented: The Sedition Act of 1798 was selectively enforced by the Adams administration against newspaper writers who supported Thomas Jefferson, his challenger in the 1800 election. The very first landmark U.S. Supreme Court case, Marbury v. Madison (1803), established the power of the judiciary by resolving a separation-of-powers dispute between the President and Congress. Write this one down https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OaHkmyKHoOY In Worcester v. Georgia

(1832), President Andrew Jackson openly defied a Supreme Court ruling--the first, last, and only time that any U.S. president has done so. During the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln took on unprecedented wartime powers and violated multiple civil liberties on a large scale, including due process rights for U.S. citizens. During the first Red Scare following World War I, President Woodrow Wilson suppressed free speech, deported immigrants on the basis of their political beliefs, and ordered massive unconstitutional raids. His policies were so draconian that they inspired protesters to form the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in 1920.

During World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued an executive order calling for the forced internment of over 120,000 Japanese Americans, as well as forced surveillance, ID cards, and occasional relocation for immigrants from other perceived "hostile" nations.

President Richard Nixon openly used executive branch law enforcement agencies to attack his political opponents and, in the case of Watergate, to actively cover up his supporters' criminal activities. Presidents Reagan, H.W. Bush, and Clinton all actively pursued expanded presidential powers. One particularly stunning example was President Clinton's claim that sitting presidents are immune from lawsuits, a position the Supreme Court rejected in

Clinton v. Jones (1997).Slide5

The Presidential View/Opinion The nature of the presidency depends on how each President views the office and exercises its powers.Two Views:

Some Presidents, such as Teddy Roosevelt, have taken a broad view of the powers they inherited

Other Presidents, like William Howard Taft, have felt that they cannot exercise any power not specifically granted to them.Slide6

The President stands as the single strong leader of the executive branch

Pull out a quarter nickel dime pennySlide7

Americans have looked to the President for leadership on complex issues

War/

Abortions

Gay rights/

Economics

Acts of

TerrorismSlide8

Congress has granted the executive branch the authority to carry out many of its laws & has thus strengthened the presidency

LAWS

+

+Slide9

Article II of the Constitution Article II, the Constitution’s Executive Article, begins this way:

“The executive power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America.”With these few words, the Framers established the presidency & his powers.

(list the 6 powers pg 390)1. 4.

2. 5.3. 6.Slide10

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z53iTIBTdpk Slide11

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zLltdiUtMTsSlide12
Slide13
Slide14

Firefighter Chris Fields carries Baylee Almon. Baylee passed away shortly after this picture was taken.

Oklahoma City April 19, 1995 It stands as the worst act of domestic terrorism in U.S. history. A

truck packed w/ explosive demolisheda 9 story building in the heart of the US,Killing 168 people, including 19 infants & children. Another 500 were injured.

Until???Slide15

9-11 Videohttp://attacked911.tripod.com/https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ut12G4qgKbc&list=PL13029619946CE639&index=40Warningthis could be graphic to some viewersSlide16

another videohttp://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/12185779/Slide17

As commander in chief, the President has been asked to take decisive action in times of national emergency/iesSlide18
Slide19

The President has used the mass media to capture public attention

=

State

of the

Union

speechSlide20

Expanded Presidential PowerNotes to followSlide21

Presidents on the PresidencyThomas Jefferson“The presidency

Is a place of Splendid misery”

William H.

Taft

“I’m glad to be going-this is the loneliest place in the world

Theodore

Roosevelt

I have enjoyed

every moment of this

so called arduous &

exacting task

Being President is

like riding a tiger

Harry S.

TrumanSlide22

Before & After

pictures of

U.S. PresidentsSlide23
Slide24

The Lighter Side of the Presidentshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L9L2rq3woXs Presidential Bloopers (Part 1 of 4)https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HA7sP47e8tA Ronald Reagan's one-linersSlide25

A Short History of the Imperial PresidencySlide26

A Short History of the Imperial Presidency: President Bush's attempt to obtain increased wartime powers represent a troubling challenge to American civil liberties. But the challenge is not unprecedented: The Sedition Act of 1798 was selectively enforced by the Adams administration against newspaper writers who supported Thomas Jefferson, his challenger in the 1800 election. The very first landmark U.S. Supreme Court case, Marbury v. Madison (1803), established the power of the judiciary by resolving a separation-of-powers dispute between the President and Congress. In Worcester v. Georgia (1832), President Andrew Jackson openly defied a Supreme Court ruling--the first, last, and only time that any U.S. president has done so. During the American Civil War, President Abraham Lincoln took on unprecedented wartime powers and violated multiple civil liberties on a large scale, including due process rights for U.S. citizens. During the first Red Scare following World War I, President Woodrow Wilson suppressed free speech, deported immigrants on the basis of their political beliefs, and ordered massive unconstitutional raids. His policies were so draconian that they inspired protesters to form the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) in 1920. During World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued an executive order calling for the forced internment of over 120,000 Japanese Americans, as well as forced surveillance, ID cards, and occasional relocation for immigrants from other perceived "hostile" nations.

President Richard Nixon openly used executive branch law enforcement agencies to attack his political opponents and, in the case of Watergate, to actively cover up his supporters' criminal activities. Presidents Reagan, H.W. Bush, and Clinton all actively pursued expanded presidential powers. One particularly stunning example was President Clinton's claim that sitting presidents are immune from lawsuits, a position the Supreme Court rejected in

Clinton v. Jones (1997).Slide27

Section 1 Review1. The Executive Article of the Constitution is (a) Article I.(b) Article II.(c) Article IV.(d) Article V.2. The two views of presidential power are mostly centered on(a) the extent of powers the President may act with.

(b) the President’s relationship to the electorate.(c) constitutional amendments curtailing presidential power.(d) none of the above. Slide28

CH 14 sec 1Review (use pgs 390-392 & notes)Article II is known as the ______ because it establishes the presidency.List the 6 presidential powers that Article II establishes. Beginning at the Philadelphia Convention in 1787, there has been a struggle between those who want a _______ and those who want a ________.Throughout American history, those who want a _________ have usually prevailed.One reason for the growth of presidential power has been the nation’s increasing complex _______.Slide29

6. The frequent need for _________ has also strengthened presidential power.7. Even _______ has strengthened the presidency by passing laws that added to the activities of the executive branch.8. Some strong, effective Presidents have stated the ________ theory, which takes a broad view of their powers.9. Critics of strong presidential power compare the President to an emperor, calling a strong presidency a(n)___________.Slide30

Ch 14 section 1 Review, use pgs 390-392Article II is known as the ______ because it establishes the presidency.List the 6 presidential powers that Article II establishes. Beginning at the Philadelphia Convention in 1787, there has been a struggle between those who want a _______ and those who want a ________.Throughout American history, those who want a _________ have usually prevailed.One reason for the growth of presidential power has been the nation’s increasing complex _______.6. The frequent need for _________ has also strengthened presidential power.

7. Even _______ has strengthened the presidency by passing laws that added to the activities of the executive branch.8. Some strong, effective Presidents have stated the ________ theory, which takes a broad view of their powers.9. Critics of strong presidential power compare the President to an emperor, calling a strong presidency a(n)___________.Slide31

Answers3 pts each#2 is 1 pt each/33Slide32

Executive Articlea. command of the armed forces b. make treaties c. approve or veto acts of Congress d. send & receive diplomatic representatives e. grant pardons & reprieves f. see that the laws are faithfully executed Strong presidency, weak presidency (any order)Strong presidency

Social & economic lifeDecisive action in time of national emergencySlide33

7. Congress8. Stewardship9. Imperial presidency10. Television, radio, printed publications, internet, smart phones, tablets, ect. which captures public interest.

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