RESERVE MANAGEMENT PLAN Mankranso Forest DistrictMARCH2016 - PDF document

RESERVE MANAGEMENT PLAN Mankranso Forest DistrictMARCH2016
RESERVE MANAGEMENT PLAN Mankranso Forest DistrictMARCH2016

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iFOREWORDThe constitution of each forest reserve mandated the then Forestry Department to develop working plans to be able to effectively and efficiently manageprotect and develop forest and wildlife ID: 879539 Download Pdf

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1 RESERVE MANAGEMENT PLAN( Mankranso Fores
RESERVE MANAGEMENT PLAN( Mankranso Forest District)MARCH,2016 i FOREWORD The constitution of each forest reserve mandated the then Forestry Department to develop working plans to be able to effectively and efficiently manage , protect and develop forest and wildlife resources in each of these reserves to benefit all segments of society . Nevertheless , a century of evolution of Forest Policy formulation , institutional transformat i on and management , including development and protection has g i ven birth to a trendy and sophisticated so cietal demand on the forests of Ghana . These developments require the reinvigoration and revision of the existing working p l ans which were written, taking into consideration the socio - economic and cultural issues prevailing at that time. The policy and t he legal framework which prevailed at the time of the constitution of these reserves emphasized on the contribution of forestry to environmental management inter alia the protection of water bodies and their sources , providing the necessary environment for our agricultural practices, prevention of erosion in mountainous areas and preservation of bio - divers i ty. This framework engendered the then Forestry Department to a non - participatory approach to resource management culminating in policing and less regard to the stakeholders . Over a period , forest and wildlife resources management reg i mes have undergone substantial changes in conformity with modern developmental t rends, more esp

2 ecially international conventions and r
ecially international conventions and ramifications . Consequently, the FC has thought it wise to revise these working plans to reflect these ramifications , technologies , geo - spatial information systems and rules and regulat i ons . Furthermore, the new plans are intended to achieve the aims of multipurpose and sustainable use of fores t and wildlife resources, promotion of ii ecotourism, Voluntary Partnerships Agreements with the European Union, climate change, carbon trade and participatory management, using participatory and collaborative intervent i ons with the use of technology to reduc e transaction cost and for effective management . Again, forest policies, master plans and legislation have also undergone great reviews, giving new directions to affect forest and wildlife management and utilization, hence the need for updated management plans. Furthermore ACT 571 re - established The Forestry Commission of Ghana which brought together hitherto different organizations mandated to protect , manage and regulate the nation's forests and wildlife resources and to provide for related matters. Therefore, suffice me to inform all stakeholders that these ramifications have obliged FC to develop and implement this management plan for sustainable and effective management and utilization of our forest and wildlife resources with more emphasis on plan tation development, improvement in carbon stock under the Reduced Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation (REDD+), the Clean Development

3 Mechanism (CDM) and the Bio - Diversit
Mechanism (CDM) and the Bio - Diversity Conservation Programmes. iii Chief Executive of Forestry Commission - Mr. Samuel Afari Dartey iv PREFACE Forest Management issues are of great concern globally due to high demand of forest resources and ever increasing population. As a result of this, the Forest Services Division (FSD) of the Forestry Commission is facing challenges in managing the nation’s f orest resources. This underscores the need to revise the old management plan in order to address these challenges to fit in the modern trends of event. This document supersedes the previous management plan for Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve. It is hoped that with the co - operation of all stakeholders – Forest Services Division of the Forestry Commission, TUC Holders, Chiefs, the various District Assemblies where the Reserve is located and the Forest Fringe Communities, this management plan will be well executed to achieve the expected objectives. The management plan was written by the District Forest Manager of Mankranso, Mr. Rexford Twum - Damoah, assisted by Messrs Yaw Opare Addo and Kwabena Adu - Bonnah, Assistant District Managers and Mr. Ofori Manu, Cartographer. The following Managers from the Regional Office were instrumental in preparation of the plan: Mr. Alex Oduro - Barnie, Regional Manager and Messrs Isaac Noble Eshun and Isaac Adonteng, Assistant Regional Managers. Mr. Alex Boamah Asare, Mr. Mo hammed Yakubu and Mr. Affu

4 m Baffoe, all of the RMSC - FC contribut
m Baffoe, all of the RMSC - FC contributed to the preparation of this plan. A technical Group made up of Mr. Raphael Yeboah, Executive Director of FSD, Mr. Alex Boadu, Director of Operations, Mr. H.C.A. Brown, Director of Plantatio ns, Mr. Edward Obiaw, Director of RMSC, Dr. Kwakye Ameyaw and Mrs. Edith Abruquah, Operation Managers of FSD, Dr Richard Gyimah, Verification Manager at TVD - FC, Mr. Ofoe Portuphy of the ICT Department, Mrs. Diana Fiati, Mr. Kofi Adu Gyamfi and Yaw Bio of O perations Unit of FSD provided technical support for the preparation of the Plan. We are very grateful to the world Bank under the NREG - TA and candidly thank them for providing support for the plans preparation. v TABLE OF CONTENTS FOREWORD ……………………………………………… …………… …... . ..... . .. .. . i PREFACE ………………………………………… ……… ………………….. . .. .. ... iv ABBREVIATION AND ACRONYMS …………………………………...…… . … xi PART I:BACKGROUND INFORMATION ……………………………… . .. . …... 1 1.1 GENERAL INTRODUCTION …………………………………… . … …. . …… 1 1.2 DESCRI PTION O F FOREST MANAGEMENT AREA ………… . ….. … .. ... . 2 1.2.1 Location and Extent………………………………………….… .. … 2 1.2.2 Physical Environment ……………………………………….… .. …. 3 1.2.3 Ownership …… ……………………

5 ………… …… …... …… ..
………… …… …... …… .. ….5 1.2.4 Communities and Socio - cultural Setting …………………... .. ……..6 1.2.5 Socio - economic Activities …………………… ……… . …… ... . …...6 1.2.5.1 Demography …………………... …… …………… .. … . ……. 6 1.2.5.2 Proposed Income Levels and Expenditure ……… … . .. .. .… . .. 7 1.2.5.3 Land Use and Ownership ……………… ……………… .. …. 8 1.2.6 Stakeholders Analysis, Roles and Responsibility …………… ... …... 8 1.2.6.1 Stakeholders, Roles and Responsibility ……………… .. …. 10 1.3. PREVIOUS MANA GEMENT OF THE AREA ………………. . … .. .. . ..10 1.3.1 General objectives of Past Working Plan …………………… .. . …. 11 1.3.2 Management categories …………………………………… .. ….… 11 1.3.2.1 Productio n (Selection) Working Circle (SWC) …… .. …… . 11 1.3.2.2 Protection Working Circle (PWC) …… ………… .. …… . … 11 1.4. CURRENT STATUS OF FOREST RESERE………..……… ... ……. .12 1.4.1 Flora Description …… ……………………………………… .… …. 12 1.4.1.1Floristic Composition and Biodiversity …… ……… .. … .. .… 12 1.4.1.2 Forest Condition …………………………………… ... …… 13 1.4.1.3 Species Composition … …………………………… ... ……. 14 vi 1.4.1.4 Species Guild ………………………

6 ……………… .. …. 16 1.4.2
……………… .. …. 16 1.4.2 Fauna Description …………………………………... …….… 16 1.4.3 Carbon stocks ………………………………… ...…………... 17 PART II: EVALUATION OF OPTIONS ……………………. …………… .... . .. ..19 2.1 PRINCIPLES AND OBJECTIVES OF FOREST MANAGEMENT … 19 2.1.1 Forest Management Principles …………………………… ... ... .. … 19 2.1.2 Current Forest Management Objectives ………………… … … ... .... 20 2.1.3 SWOT Analysis of Objectives ………… ………………… ... …….. 20 2.2 SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES OF MANAGEMENT OPTIONS …….. ...... . . 23 2.2.1 PRODUCTION OBJECTIVE: …………………………… …. . …... 24 PROTECTION OBJECTIVE: ………………………………… . … ... . .… 24 REFORESTATION OBJECTIVE: …………………………… …. … . …. 24 GOVERNANCE AND BENEFIT SHARING OBJECTIVES: … ... ... …. 24 2. 3 RESEARCH OBJECTIVES: ……………………………………… ….. … 25 2.4. SUPPORTI NG AUXILLIARY OBJECTIES………………… … ….. .25 PART III: MANAGEMENT PRESCRIPTION ……………… ………… ... …….28 Forest Management Zones …………………………..……………………… … … ... . 27 3.1 PRODUCTION …………………………………….………. … ….. … … … 29 3.1.1 Timber Production ………………………………………… …. …... 29 3.

7 1 .2 Non - Timber Forest Products (NT
1 .2 Non - Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) ……………………… … …. 29 3.1. 3 Natural Regeneration Operations and E nrichment Planting … … … 30 3.1 .3 .1 Undertake Natural Regeneration of Economically Desirable Timber Species …………………………………………… ... ….…. 30 3.1. 3 .2 Undertake Enrichment Planting …………………… … …… 30 3.1. 3 .3 Undertake Coppice Management ………………… … … …. 31 3.2 PROTECTION ………………………………………... ……… … ... .. ……. 31 3.2.1 Boundary Protection ………………………………… ... ………….. 31 3.2.2 Forest Biodiversity Conservation (Flora and Fauna) …… ... ..….…. 31 3.2.3 Hill Sanctuary …………………………………………… ... ……… 32 vii 3.2.4 Swamp Area …………………………………………… .. …… . ….. 32 3.2.5 Watershed Management ……………………………………… . … .. 32 3.2.6 Wildfire Management ………………………………………… .. … 33 3.2.7 Management of Invasive Species ……………………………… .. . . 33 3.3 REFORESTATION ………………………………… . …………… .…..… . 33 3.3.1 Reforestation of Degraded Area ……………………… …. . .. ... …… 33 3.3.2Maintenance of Established Plantations ………………… … …... …. 34 3.4 GOVERNANCE AND BENEFIT SHARING …………

8 …………… … .. . 35 3.4.1 Ad
…………… … .. . 35 3.4.1 Admitted Farms …………………………………..……….… … …. 35 3.4. 2 Communal / Domestic Rights ………………………….…… .... .… 35 3.4 .3 Alternative Livelihood Interventions … …………….…….… … .… 36 3.4. 4 Law Enforcement ……………………..………………….… … ….. 36 3.4. 5 Benefit Sharing ………………….…………………….…… … ….. 36 3.5 RESEARCH PRESCRIPTIONS …………… ……………………… … . . .. 37 3.6 INFRASTRUCTURAL DEVELOPMENT ………………… …... ..... … .. . 37 3.6.1 Road and Track Network: ………………………………..… .… …. 37 3.6.2 Building: ………………………………………………… …… …... 38 3.6.3 Logistics …………………………………………………..… …. … 38 3.6.4 Telecommunication Mast ………………………………...… …. .... 38 3.6.5 Office Equipments: ………………………………………… … ….. 38 3.7 HEALTH AND SAFETY FOR FIELD OPERATIONS ……… . … …….. … 38 PART IV: PLANT IMPLEMENTATION, MONITORING AND EVALUATION 4.1 MANAGEMENT PLAN IMPLEMENTATION ………………… …. ….…... 40 4.1.1 Implementation Arrangements …………………………………… …. …….… 40 4.2 COSTS AND REVENUE FLOW DISTRIBUTION …………… …. …….… 43 4.2.1 Cost Estimates …………………

9 ………………………………….
………………………………….… … .……. 43 4.2.2 Sources of Revenue ………………………………………………… … .….…. 47 4.2.3 Revenue Prediction ………………………………………………… …. ……... 47 4.2.4 Revenue Disbursement Arrangement ………………………………… …. …... 48 4.2.5 Funding Sources …………………………………………………… … ……… 48 viii 4.3 MONITORING, EVALUATION AND REVIEW ……………….… ... ……….. 49 4.3.1 Monitoring strategies …………………………………………..… ... ………… 49 4.3. 1 . 1 Criteria for review ……………………………………………… ... ………… 52 REFERENCES ………………………………………………………… ... ……….. 53 APPENDICES APPENDIX 1a: Schedule Description of boundaries ………………………… ... … 55 APPENDIX 1b: Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve Boundary Maintenance Schedule…… 57 APPENDIX 2a : ……………………………………………………………… … …. 58 APPENDIX 2b: ……………………………………………………………… … …. 59 APPENDIX 3a : Status Of Compartments In Ti nte Bepo Forest Reserve……….... .. 60 APPENDIX 3b: Concession Owners//Special Permits …………………………….. 61 APPENDIX 3c : Existing Havesting Schedule For Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve ……………………

10 …………….…………………
…………….…………………………………........... 63 APPENDIX 5: Current Management Status Of Admitted Rights Within Tinte Bepo Forest R eserve ………………………………………………..……………………... 65 APPENDIX 6: Native Authority Ordinance Establishing Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve ……………………………………………………....……………………... 69 APPENDIX 7:SPECIES LIST TINTE BEPO FOREST RESERVE ……… …. . 72 APPENDIX 8: Stem Numbers Per Km 2 Grouped According To Cm Diameter Classes. Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve. Survey Conducted In May 2015 ……………………... 80 APPENDIX 9 : Basal Ar ea In M 2 Per Km 2 Grouped According To Cm Diameter Classes. Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve. Survey Conducted In May 2015 ……………. 85 APPENDIX 10 : V olume In M 3 per Km 2 Grouped According To Cm Diameter Classes. Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve. Survey Conducted In May 2015 …………… . 89 APPENDIX 11: Tons Of Carbon Dioxide Equivalent Per Ha Of All �Species = 10 Cm Dbh. ………………………………………………………………………...... 93 APPENDIX 12: Birds (Fauna Survey, May 2015.) ……………………….……..… 96 APPENDIX 12 B: Mammals (Fauna Survey, May 2015.) …………...………...… 100 TINTE BEPO MANAGEMENT PLAN 2016 - 2026 BUDGET ……… …... …. 101 ix INDEX OF TABLES Table 1 - Key facts of Forest Reserve ………………………

11 ……………… ……. . 3 Table
……………… ……. . 3 Table 2: Summary of Mean Annual Rainfall (mm) for Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve ……………………………………………………………………… …...… . 4 Table 3: 2010 Population and Housing Census for some o f the Forest Fringe Communities …………………………………………………………………… …… . 7 Table 4 Estimated Annual Income for Some Fringe Communities ………… …… …. 8 Table 5: Stakeholders Interest Analysis ……………………………… …… ……. … 9 Table 6: Stakeholders, Roles and Responsibility ………… ……………… …… … ...10 Table 7: Comparative Analysis Current State to Previous Research ……… ...…. ….. 13 Table 8: Common species Recorded in Different Diameter Classes ……… …… …. 15 Table 9: Species Guild an d corresponding Relative Abundance ………… ……... … 16 Table 10: SWOT Analysis of the Production Objective of Management …… ...….. . 21 Table 11: SWOT Analysis of the Prot ection Obj ective of Management.. ...... ........ .. .22 Table 12: SWOT analysis of the Reforestation objective of management … …… .... 22 Table 13: Current Management Zones in Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve …… ……. ….. 23 Table 14: Implementation Arrangement for Production Zone (2016 - 2026) … …… . 40 Table 15: Implementation Arrangement for Protection Zone (2016 - 2026) … ……. .. 41 Table 16: Implementation

12 Arrangement for Reforestation Zone (201
Arrangement for Reforestation Zone (2016 - 2026) …… . 42 Table 17: Cost Estimates …………………………………………………… ……. .. 43 Table 18: Summary of revenue prediction for the first 5 years ( 2016 - 2021) of the planned period………………………… ……… .. .. … … …………….. . … ……. . 47 Table 19: Summary of Predicted Revenue Disbursement Arrangement for the first 5 Years (20 16 - 2021) of the Planned Period………………………… …...... . … 48 Table 20: Monit oring an d Evaluation Framework………………………. … ……. ... 50 x LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1: Graph of Mean Annual Rainfall (mm) 2004 – 2014 for Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve …………………………………………………………………..…… ... ….. ..4 Figure 2: Tree diameter class distribution in Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve (RMSC 2015) …… ……………………………………………………………….… ... ……. ..15 Figure 3: Zonation Map Of Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve. …………… …… ... … …...2 8 Figure 4: Progress Map For Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve …………………… ... … …. 28 xi ABBREVIATION AND ACRONYMS ADM Assistant District Manager CFC Community Forest Committees DA District Assembly FC Forestry Commission FG Forest Guard FMU Forest Management Unit FORIG Forest Research

13 Institute of Ghana FFC Forest Fri
Institute of Ghana FFC Forest Fringe Communities FRBP Forest Reserve Boundary Pillar FSD Forest Services Division FV Fire Volunteers GNFS Ghana National Fire Service ILO International KNUST Kwame Nkrumah Univer sity of Science and Technology LAS Legality Assurance System L/F Labour MLFR Ministry of Land Forestry and Natural Resources MoP Manual of Procedures MOU Memorandum of Understanding MSNW Moist Semi - Deciduous North West MTS Modified Taungya System NFPDP National Forest plantation Development Programme NGO Non Governmental Organization NPLD Non Pioneer Light Demanders NTFPs Non timber Forest Products OASL Office of the Administration of Stool Lands PES Payment of Environmental Services PSP Permanent Sample Plot PWC Production Working Circle SWC Selective Working Circle xii REDD+ Reduced Emission on Deforestation and Degradation RI Religious Institutions RM Regional Manager RMSC Resource Management Support Centre RS Range Supervisor SA Sec urity Agencies SRA Social Responsibility Agreement TA Traditional Authority TUC/P Timber Utilization Contract/Permit TVD Timber validation Department UENR University of Energy and Natural Resources VPA Voluntary Partnership Agreement WD Wildlife Division WTS Wood Tracking System xiii Executive Director ,FSD - Mr. Raphael Yeboah Director Operatio

14 ns, FSD (HFZ) - Mr. Alex A. Boadu 1
ns, FSD (HFZ) - Mr. Alex A. Boadu 1 TINTE BEPO FOREST RESERVE MANAGEMENT PLAN PART I: BACKGROUND INFORMATION 1.1 General Introduction The need to revise and/or prepare standard management plans to guarantee the conservation and sustainable development of the nation’s forest and wildlife resources for maintenance of environmental quality and perpetual flow of benefits to all segments of s ociety is consistent with the forest and wildlife policy of 2013. Forest Reserve management plan is a key strategic planning tool required by the Forestry Commission in order to provide the overall management direction for an individual Reserve. The mana gement plan , which is the output of forest management planning, is the mechanism into which the whole range of requirements and plans for sustainable forest management are brought together and turned into a cohesive whole. The management plan is, primarily , a document for the forest manager, which is used as the basis for all the activities undertaken in the forest. Considerable efforts have been made for this plan to meet all legal requirements for management planning documentation. This forest management plan applies to the Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve which falls under Forest Management Unit (FMU) 36. The last management plan was prepared for the period January 1993 – December 2012. The main purpose of this revised plan is to present the current state of kn owledge about the extent and quality of forest resources, their utilization, and t

15 he zoning of the forest into recognized
he zoning of the forest into recognized management categories based on defined principles. The Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve Management Plan is produced to guard the conduct of p resent and future managers in order to prevent ad hoc decisions on the management of the reserve. The planning period will include 5 year short term in which Annual Programme of Work (APW) will be prepared. The plan is set within a time framework of ten (1 0) years and subject to renew at least every five (5) years. During 2 the planning level, the National, Regional and District resource development and environmental plan will be made to fit into the plan and the planning level will concentrate on only Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve. Information obtained from other stake holders in the consultation process will help define the kind of prescriptions that will be needed to improve upon the sustainable management of the Forest Reserve. 1.2 Description of Forest Man agement Area 1.2.1 LOCATION AND EXTENT The Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve constitutes Forest Management Unit (FMU) 36. It derives its name from the highest hill within the reserved area. It is currently situated in the Mankranso Forest District, which was carve d out of the Nkawie Forest District on November 2014, in the Ashanti Region. It lies between latitudes 6 0 33’ and 7 0 03’ North and longitude 1 0 55’ and 2 0 06’ West. The FMU 36 is located on Ghana Survey Department Topographical Field Sheets (Sunyani S.E. s heet 162 (North B.30) (D.IvS.K), Kuk

16 uom N.E. sheet 124 (North B.20) (J.II NE
uom N.E. sheet 124 (North B.20) (J.II NE) and Kumasi N.W. sheet 127 (North B.20) (K.I.N.W). The reserve lies 4km south - west of Mankranso, the Ahafo Ano South District Assembly headquarters in the Ashanti Region of Ghana. It falls within the political jurisdiction of the Ahafo Ano South and Ahafo Ano North District Assemblies. The Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve falls within the Moist Semi - Deciduous North West (MSNW) ecological zone. It has a gross area of 115.54km 2 (11,554.00h a) of which admitted farms constitute 0.836km 2 . The total external and internal perimeters are 64.62km and 10.56km, respectively. 3 TABLE 1 - KEY FACTS OF FOREST RESERVE Forest Reserve Code Area (Km 2 ) Perimeter (Km) [External] Number of Admitted Farms (Area) Perimeter(Km) [Internal] of Farms FMU Tinte Bepo TIBE 115.54 (11,554.0ha) 64.62 22 (83.60ha) 10.56 36 Source: Management Plan (1993 – 2012). The external boundaries are made up of cut lines of 2 meters wide and marked with concrete pillars at 800 meters intervals except where we have major changes in the direction of the boundaries. 1.2.2 PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT a) Topography The Forest Reserve is particularly hilly at the central portion with an average height of 365.76m above sea level. It is located within the Tano and Offin watershed. There are four (4) isolated hills with steep sides in the mid - east of the Reserve. The Reserve has the highest peak in the middle block with an altitude of about

17 535.50m above sea level in the South -
535.50m above sea level in the South - Western corner of th e Reserve. The land is moderately undulating in the northern section of the reserve. Numerous streams flow through the reserve including Abu, Aboabo, Nsakasu, Abotasu, Aworo, Anyinasu, Dwinyai and Denyami. Most of them do dry up during the dry season, exce pt Abu which Abu floods up extensively during the rainy seasons. b) Climate The reserve is characterized by two (2) rainfall seasons, occurring in May June and September – November. Mean Annual rainfall recorded in the area is 1,349.9mm. Dry seasons is betwee n December and March with February as the driest month. Rainfall figures for the period 2004 to 2011 recorded at Nkawie Meteorological Station are indicated in Table 2. 4 TABLE 2: SUMMARY OF MEAN ANNUAL RAINFALL (MM) FOR TINTE BEPO FOREST RESERVE. Year 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Mean Annual Rainfall 1,201.8 1,118.3 1,166.3 1,442.3 1,441.5 1,588.2 1,473.0 1,427.2 1,456.6 1,271.8 1,262.1 Source: Nkawie Meteorological Station, 2015. Figure 1 Graph of Mean Annual Rainfall (mm) 2004 – 2014 for Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve. The mean annual maximum temperature is 32.5 0 C and the mean minimum annual temperature is 21 0 C. The relative humidity is high throughout the year and is usually above 80%. February and August are usually the hottest and coldest month, respectively. Rainy season winds are south westerly and moisture - laden. In t

18 he dry season the Hamarttan winds which
he dry season the Hamarttan winds which are north - easterly predominates. c) Geology and soils Forest ochrosol is the ma in soil type of the region and it extends over the three geological formations namely; the Cape Coast Granite complex, the Lower and Upper Birim Metamorphic rocks ( 1955 Working Plan ). 0.00 200.00 400.00 600.00 800.00 1,000.00 1,200.00 1,400.00 1,600.00 1,800.00 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 Mean Annual Rainfamm/mm Year Rainfall Trend in Tinte Bepo 5 1.2.3 Ownership The Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve was gazetted in 1928. The reser ve was constituted and demarcated as a forest reserve under the Kumasi Native Authority (Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve) Rules, 1949 of 15 th December, 1949. The rules revoked the previous set of rules in respect of the Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve, Tinte Bepo East Extension Forest Reserve and Tinte Bepo West Extension Forest Reserve. The Reserve is protected under Forest Ordinance Cap 157, The Administration of Land Act 1962, the Forest Protection Decree, 1974 and Forest Protection Law, 1986, (PNDCL 142). The Ownership of the reserve is vested in the Golden Stool, and it is within its jurisdiction. However, the stools of Hia, Kronti, Bechem and Akyimpim are acting as caretakers on behalf of the Asantehene. All tributes and revenues accruing from the reserve are paid to the caretaker stools. Communal, individual/domestic and timber rights are vested in the state. However, rights for farming in

19 d emarcated admitted farms within the fo
d emarcated admitted farms within the forest reserve are permitted. Permits for timber and other minor produce for commercial purposes are issued by the Chief Executive of the Forestry Commission or his authorized representative. However, the fringe communit ies have domestic user rights over Non - Timber Forest Products (NTFPs) such as snails, mushroom, chew sticks, medicinal plants, fruits, and gathering of firewood, pestles, rafters, small posts and poles for building within communal households. Hunting of ga me is regulated by the Wildlife Division of the Forestry Commission through the issuance of permits. Timber Rights are allocated by Forestry Commission to contractors as laid down in the Timber Resources Management Act (ACT 547 of 1997 and accompanying le gislation and/or amendments). Cultural rights in the form of taboo days are vested in the fringe communities. Rules were earlier made by the Asantehene and his Councilors with the approval of the then Governor under Section 15(1) of the Native Authority Or dinance, 1935. These Rules include; application, prohibition against the extension of farms, precaution against fire, damage to trees, arrest of offenders, penalty, reservation of hunting rights, saving in respect of Concession rights and 6 Demarcation Sche dule of the Reserve. All forest offences are tried in the nearest Magistrate or Circuit Court. Rules 11 of 1937 Section III (9) - SAVINGS AS TO CERTAIN RIGHTS, stated that; nothing in these rules shall in anyway affect the right of a

20 ny person (who prior t o their coming in
ny person (who prior t o their coming into force has lawfully enjoyed such right) to shoot, hunt, fish or collect snails, within the boundaries of the Reserve. The administration of the forest reserve is by the Mankranso Forest District. 1.2.4 Communities and Socio - cultural Se tting The settlements within 5km radius surrounding the Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve are Biokrom, Abesewa, Nyamebekyere, Fawoman, Pokukrom, Nsuta, Amangoase, Sunkwa, Sikaasem, Hiapae, Mmoroben, Wioso, Hwibaa, Dormaa, Betinko, Jacobu, Kwamekyemkrom, Bonkrom, W awase, Asuadei, Abruaso, Mmehame and Gambia. The current ethnic composition for indigenes and migrants in the fringe communities is 60% and 40% (2015 Socio - economic survey) as compared to 80% and 20% during the preparation of the (Previous Mgt Plan, 1993) , for the fringe communities within 5km radius around Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve. 1.2.5 Socio - economic Activities The main economic activities are farming and agricultural - related businesses such as cocoa farming, petty trading (farm produce & small shop s), hired labour (predominantly farm work), government workers (public service) and chainsaw operators. The following fringe communities which were selected for the socio - economic survey using Participatory Rural Approach (PRA) are Asuadei, Wioso, Nsuta, A besewa (Ahafo Ano South) Betinko (Ahafo Ano North) Kwamensiahkrom (Tano South). 1.2.5.1 Demography The population of communities surrounding the Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve is estimated at 25,000 based

21 on socio - economic survey carried out i
on socio - economic survey carried out in the area by FSD and RMSC. Wioso has the largest population of about 3,581. The population of 7 migrant farmers aroun d the Forest Reserve is higher as compared to the indigenes due to the search of fertile land and agricultural opportunities. Table 3: 2010 Population and Housing Census for some of the Forest Fringe Communities. Community Male Female Total Wioso 1,751 1,830 3,581 Ahwerewam 1,657 1,644 3,301 Pokukrom 1,509 1,687 3,196 Abesewa 1,427 1,507 2,934 Nyamebekyere 1,278 1,156 2,434 Hwibaa 1,106 1,179 2,285 Nsuta 1,035 1,017 2,052 Asuadei 914 910 1,824 Fawoman 708 692 1,400 *Betinko *Kwamensiahkrom *Biokrom *Amangoase *Sunkwa *Sikakrom *Hiapae *Dormaa *Mmoroben * Kwamekyemkrom * Bonkrom *Wawase * Abruaso * Mmehame * Gambia *Communities not found in the database. Source: Ghana Statistical Service: 2010 Population and Housing Census 1.2.5.2 PROPOSED INC OME LEVELS AND EXPEN DITURE From the PRA sessions, the estimated annual incomes reported vary from community to community and from person to person. 8 TABLE 4 ESTIMATED AN NUAL INCOME FOR SOME FRINGE C OMMUNITIES Community Estimated Annual Incomes, 䝈ꈀ Asuadei 1,000.00 – 25,000.00 Wioso 500.00 – 3,000.00 Betinko 5,000.00 – 10,000.00 Nsuta 2,000.00

22 – 3,500.00 Abesewa 4,000.00
– 3,500.00 Abesewa 4,000.00 – 50,000.00 Kwamensiahkrom 3,000.00 – 50,000.00 1.2.5.3 LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP Fifty percent (50%) of community members have personal or land lease ownership. Others are Share cropping such as abunu (25%) and Hiring (25%). 1.2.6 STAKEHOLDERS ANALYSI S, ROLES AND RESPONS IBILITY The Landowners, Traditional Authorities, Distr ict Assemblies, Government of Ghana (FC) and Timber Utilization Contract/Permit (TUC/TUP) holders are usually recognized as the main stakeholders of the Reserve. In its broadest sense, any individual or group of persons or institution that has an interest in or a right of a sort, over the reserve can be recognized as a stakeholder. However, the different stakeholders may exhibit different types of interest and importance which could change over time. 9 Table 5: Stakeholders Interest Analysis No. Category Stakeholder Type of interest Perceived importance 1 Landowners Hia, Bechem and Tepa Traditional Councils, Land owning stool(s) Revenue, enforcement of traditional bye laws High 2 Resource users Farmers Land for farming High Hunters Hunt for game and meat for dietary requirements Medium 3 Private sector Timber contractors Harvesting of timber resources High Chainsaw operators Wood products High Wood artisans Wood products High 4 Resource managers and regulators Forestry Commission Sustainable management of the resource, and e

23 nforcement of Forest Laws High 5
nforcement of Forest Laws High 5 Traditional authority Chief and elders Share of revenue High 6 Forest fringe communities Community settlements within 5km radius of the reserve Right to obtain NTFPs for domestic use Medium 7 Academic and Research Institutions KNUST, FORIG, Individuals etc. Research/ Teaching / Practical work Low 8 Government Agencies District Inter - Fire Organization (DIFO) - MOFA, GNFS, NADMO, NCCE, etc. Public education on prevention and control of wildfires High 9 Civil society groups Fire Volunteer Groups Prevention of wildfire entry into the reserve, Check the use of fire around the reserve during the dry season. High 10 1.2.6.1 Stakeholders, Roles and Responsibility In order to protect the forest from degradation the identified stakeholders were assigned roles and responsibilities in Table 6 below. Table 6: Stakeholders, Roles and Responsibility. Roles and Responsibility FC TA L/F DA FV FFC SA T RI TUC CFC Protect and guard the forest. * * * Reforestation Initiatives * * Reforestation Activities * Boundary Cleaning * Wildfire Fighting and Education. * * Forest Education and Sensitization * * * Enact By - Laws * * Monitoring Implementation of SRA * * * Forest Law Enforcement *

24 * NB: FC - Forest
* NB: FC - Forestry Commission, TA - Traditional Authority, L/F - Labour/Farmers, DA - District Assembly, FV - Fire Volunteers, FFC - Forest Fringe Communities, SA - Security Agencies, T - Teachers, Religious Institutions, TUC - Timber Utilization Holders, CFC – Community Forest Committees. 1.3 Previous Management of the Area The first Working Plan for the Forest Reserve was prepared for 5 years from 1st July1957 to 30 th June 1962. Revision of the plan was supposed to take place between January and June 1962 but there are no records to indicate it was done. There was no review of the management plan until 1993. The January 1993 – December 2012 working pla n was the latest reviewed document on the reserve. Permanent sample 11 plots are located in compartments 4, 7, 8, 11, 12, 13 and 14 of Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve. 1.3.1 GENERAL OBJECTIVES O F PAST WORKING PLAN  To manage the forest for optimum and continuous p roduction of wood for timber and non - timber products.  To increase the quantity and quality of commercial and potential commercial trees and if possible to accelerate their growth through silvicultural treatment and management practices.  To maintain the pro tective role of the forest.  To satisfy the demands of the local people for forest produce to a reasonable extent. 1.3.2 MANAGEMENT CATEGORIE S According to the January 1993 – December 2012 working plan of the Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve, the entir

25 e FMU of gross area 11,554.0ha was div
e FMU of gross area 11,554.0ha was divided into two (2) working circles: Production (Selection) and Protection working circles. 1.3.2.1 PRODUCTION (SELECTIO N) WORKING CIRCLE (S WC) The Production Working Circle covers the entire reserve excluding the area with slopes greater than 30% which were designated as protected areas. The felling cycle was for 40years with effect from 1993. The area was given as concession for Ehwia Wood Products Limited. The company collapsed and most of the staffs were not paid. The agg rieved staff practiced illegal logging in the reserve which caused the degradation of the Forest Reserve. 1.3.2.2 PROTECTION WORKING C IRCLE (PWC) This Protection Working circle comprised all lands in the forest reserve other than the Production Working Ci rcle. It covered the hilly parts of the reserve. Activities undertaken in the PWC included cleaning and maintenance of external and internal boundaries and pillaring at approximately 800m interval and at major changes of 12 direction on external boundaries. The reserve experienced annual wildfires, illegal logging, chainsawing and farming and this have rendered the zones vulnerable to the invasion of Broussonetia papyrifera ( York) and Chromolaena odorata (Acheampong weed). 1.4 Current Status of Forest Reserve 1.4.1 FLORA DESCRIPTION C. J. Taylor (1961) classified the Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve as belonging to the Celtis - Triplochiton association, whilst Hall and Swaine (1981) put the reserve within Moi

26 st Semi - Deciduous (No rth - West type)
st Semi - Deciduous (No rth - West type) (MSNW) and contains several species. The two classifications further described the structure of the reserve as consisting of three (3) distinct storeys. These include upper, middle and lower canopies with tall emergent trees exceeding 50m. The stands in general appear to be open in the middle and upper level, and very much so in the emergent canopies. Furthermore, beneath the trees in lower canopy there are small palms, shrubs, treelets and large ferns. On the forest floor is made up of her baceous plants and tree seedlings. The condition of the forest crop can generally be described as normal but in areas subjected to periodic inundation as well as permanently swampy, growth conditions are poor. 1.4.1.1 FLORISTIC COMPOSITIO N AND BIODIVERSI TY A total of 132 species were recorded in the floral survey conducted by RMSC in May 2015. Total number of species for the MSNW ecological zone is however 337 (FIP, 1989). The diameter class distribution typifies a normal, uneven aged forest that has mos t individuals in the lower diameter class and few individuals in the upper class which signifies the ability for the forest reserve to recover naturally with little intervention. The abundance of light demanding species (Pioneer and NPLD) relative to shade bearing species is an indication that the Reserve can recover in the gaps created as a result of wildfires and illegal logging. 13 Economic Index has reduced from 89, as indicated by Hawthorne and Abu - Jua

27 m (1995), to 44.7 in the RMSC Survey (2
m (1995), to 44.7 in the RMSC Survey (2015), there ar e considerable numbers of reddish star (scarlet, red and pink) species which indicates the reserve has potential economic importance, though there are not much merchantable size trees. The reduction in economic trees may probably be due to unsustainable ti mber harvesting and wildfires. 1.4.1.2 FOREST CONDITION The classification of the tree species into guilds is an important indicator of the forest succession stage and past disturbance. Dominance of light demanding (Pioneer species - 32%, NPLD - 34%) species compared to Shade - bearing species - 22.5% is an indication of excessive disturbance to Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve. There has been a number of disturbance notably wildfires, illegal logging and illegal farms. This is depicted in the average condition score of 4.3 which suggests a degraded forest but could however recover with minimal intervention. Regeneration of economic trees of 97.8 stems per ha for the reserve compared with the 438.82 for Moist Semi - Deciduous North West zone (MSNW) is quite encouraging c onsidering the stresses that the area has experienced over the years. Basal area of 4.7m 2 /ha compared to 21.73m 2 /ha for the MSNW shows the forest is very degraded. Standing volume of 51.6 is far lower than the ecological zone average of 399.26m3/ha which indicates that the reserve is currently not suitable area for timber production. Restocking of the reserve to provide socio - economic and environmental benefit should a prio

28 rity issue. TABLE 7: COMPARATIVE A
rity issue. TABLE 7: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS CURRENT STATE TO PRE VIOUS RESEARCH. Parameter RMSC (2015) Hawthorne and Abu – Juam (1991) Remarks Genetic Heat Index (GHI) 68.2 46 Indicates an improvement in the conservation value of the reserve. 14 Parameter RMSC (2015) Hawthorne and Abu – Juam (1991) Remarks Economic Index (EI) 44.7 89 Suggests a depletion of economic tree species in the reserve over the years. Basal Area (m 2 /ha) 4.7 21.73 Basal Area has drastically reduced. Regeneration (stems/ha) 97.8 388 Very poor. Forest Condition Score 4.3 3.0 Indicates degraded forest but could however recover with minimal intervention. Carbon (tCO 2 e/ha 20.17 Above ground carbon is far below both closed and open estimates of 148 and 64 tCO 2 e per ha for MSNW ecozone. Stand volume (m 3 /ha) 51.04 All Trees ≥10cm dbh. Broussonetia papyrifera (York) alone has 15.25 m 3 /ha. NB. For the current estimates above refer to those tables annexed to this report. 1.4.1.3 SPECIES COMPOSITION Moraceae, Mimosaceae, Sterculiaceae, Meliaceae, Caesalpiniaceae, and Euphorbiaceae are among the common plant fam ilies observed within the reserve. Most common tree species encountered include the invasive Broussonetia papyrifera and indigenous species such as Celtis mildbraedii, Trichilia prieureana, Triplochiton scleroxylon, Ricinodendron heudolotii, Sterculia rhin opetala, Nesogordonia papaverifera etc. Stem numbers ba

29 sed on tree diameter size distribution s
sed on tree diameter size distribution showed a steep negative exponential curve typical for uneven - aged forest. 15 Figure2: Tree diameter class distribution in Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve (RMSC 2015) Most of the trees fall within the 2 - 9.9cm to 30 - 49.9cm diameter classes with very few individuals occurring in the upper diameter classes of 50 - 69.9 to 110cm and above. Species common to the various diameter classes are listed in the Table 8 below. TABLE 8: COMMON SPECIES RE CORDED IN DIFFERENT DIAMETER CLASSES 10 - 29.9cm 30 - 49.9 to 90 - 109cm 110 - 130cm Celtis mildbraedii Celtis mildbraedii Amphimas pterocarpoides Trichilia monadelpha Ricinodendron heudelotii Ceiba pentandra Ricinodendron heudelotii Ceiba pentandra Celtis adolfi - friderici Sterculia rhinopetala Trilepisium madagascariense Ficus sur Cola gigantea Entandrophragma angolense Lannea welwitschii Nesogordonia papyverifera Blighia sapida 16 Triplochiton scleroxylon Treculia africana Celtis adolfi - friderici Sterculia tragacantha Albizia zygia Morus mesozygia 1.4.1.4 SPECIES GUILD Four categories of species guild (Pioneers, Non Pioneer light demanders (NPLD), shade bearers and Swamp) were identified. Table 9: Species Guild and corresponding Relative Abundance Species Guild Relative Abundance (%) Pioneers 32.6 Non Pioneer Light Demanders (NPLD) 34.9 Shade bearers 22.5 Swamp 1.6 Unknown 8.4 1.4.2 FAUNA DE

30 SCRIPTION Overall, a total of 444 actu
SCRIPTION Overall, a total of 444 actual sightings and vocalization of birds indicating the presence of 163 different bird species were recorded during the reconnaissance walk survey of the three sites (i.e. open with Broussonetia spp. , degraded and highly degraded forest). A total number of 42 individual mammals were recorded in the Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve belonging to 23 different mammal species. The most abundant species in the three survey areas was the Bushbuck (Family Artiodactyla). See Appendix 12a and 12b for details. Hunting pressure is also high throughout the reserve. Evidence of hunting, including spent cartridges, snares and hunting trails were found in all vegetation types. There is the need to control hunting as it poses a significant threat to the large mammals and larger birds within the entire reserves so as to create semblance of refugee and recovery areas for certain species to facilitate repopulation. 17 The Forestry Commission staff and the indigenes in the forest fringe communities must be educa ted on the importance of faunal conservation and associated laws of the country (close season regulations) so that they can effectively assist in law enforcement. 1.4.3 CARBON STOCKS Even though Tinte Bepo is located within the high forest zone, the resu lts indicate that it has an above ground tCO2e of 20.17 per ha. This figure is far below both the closed and open forest estimates of Moist Semi - deciduous North West ecological zone (148 and 64 tCO2e per ha respec

31 tively). Species that contributed signi
tively). Species that contributed signific antly to carbon stocks in Tinte Bepo include Brossonetia papyrifera, Celtis mildbradii, Ricinodendron heudelotii, Ficus sur, Trichilia prieuriana, Trichilia orientalis, Lannea welwitshii, Nesogordonia papaverifera, Entandrophragma angolense and Funtumia el astica (Table 7). Table 7 Summary of first 10 species with the highest amount of carbon stocks in in Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve Genus Species Local Name Carbon (tons/Ha) tCO2e/Ha Brossonetia Papyrifera York 3.77 13.84 Celtis Mildbraedii Esa 1.80 6.59 Ricinodendron Heudelotii Wama 0.63 2.33 Ficus Sur Nwadua 0.50 1.83 Trichilia Prieuriana Kakadikro 0.48 1.76 Trichilia Orientalis Sesea 0.45 1.65 Lannea Welwitshii Kumanini 0.40 1.46 Nesogordonia Papaverifera Danta 0.38 1.38 Entandrophragma Angolense Edinam 0.33 1.22 Funtumia Elastica Frumtum 0.28 1.03 It could be seen that from Appendix 11 that only few species contributed to carbon stocks in Tinte and that apart from Brossenetia papyrifera none of them contributed 18 more than 10 tCO2e per ha. Appendix 11 is the list of tree species encountered at Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve. Community members participating in socio - economic survey A resource person presenting the results of the socio - economic survey to the community 19 PART II: EVALUATION OF OPTIONS 2.1 Principles and Objectives of Forest Management 2.1.1 FOREST MA

32 NAGEMENT PR INCIPLES Current state of
NAGEMENT PR INCIPLES Current state of knowledge about the Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve suggests that the forest resources of the reserve have decrease in quantity and quality. The situation if not reversed will adversely affect forest governance and sustainable development. The preparation of this plan therefore took cognizance of the fundamental importance of the principles of sustainability as an essential ingredient for setting o bjectives and subsequent implementation of prescriptions. Forest management principles describe how forests have to be managed to meet social, economic, ecological and cultural, and to some extent the spiritual needs of present and future generations. In managing the Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve basic principles of forest management which comprise the following elements will be applied: i. Forest policy and legal framework. ii. Law enforcement. iii. Security of tenure of forest resources and land. iv. Effective forest protection. v. Knowledge on sustainability of tropical forest ecosystems including biodiversity conservation. vi. Maintenance of site productivity. vii. Forest management planning; realistic operational plans with budgeted activities. viii. Goals and objectives for forest m anagement clearly defined. ix. Assessment of f orest resources relying on expanded baseline data (example carbon stocks estimation, biodiversity information covering fauna and flora). x. Application of appropriate silvicultural systems. xi. Consider

33 ation of REDD+ and broader climate chan
ation of REDD+ and broader climate change issues. xii. Environmental and social safeguards. 20 xiii. Regard for the interests of forest fringe communities. xiv. Explore opportunities for payment for environmental services (PES). xv. Monitoring of managerial performance. 2.1.2 CURRENT FOREST MANAG EMENT OBJECTIVES The goal of this plan is to ensure sustainable timber production, increase the timber resource base through enrichment planting, plantation development and biodiversity conservation for the realization of environmental services. This is in pursuit of the FC’s vision “to leave future generations and their communities with richer, better and more valuable forestry and wildlife endowments than we inherited”. Based on the above goal, the Forest Reserve is currently div ided into three main manag ement zones, namely Production, Protection (Hill Sanctuary, Convalescence and Swamp) and Conversion. The main objectives are enumerated as follows: i. To improve the protective functions of the forest ecosystems and ensure biodiversity conservation. ii. To ensure restoration of degraded forest areas through enrichment planting and reforestation. iii. To improve forest governance through effective collaboration with stakeholders . iv. To protect, maintain and enhance research plots within the reserve for educ ation purposes. These objectives are similar to those stated in the previous working plans but the decline in the quantity and quality

34 of resources in the Forest Reserve has
of resources in the Forest Reserve has necessitated the need for more emphasis on restoration of degraded forest areas through enrichment planting and reforestation. 2.1.3 SWOT ANALYSIS OF OBJ ECTIVES Tables 10, 11 and 12 summarize a the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats identified to influence the achievement of the overall objective of the Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve management plan. 21 TABLE 10: SWOT ANALYSIS OF THE PRODUCTION OBJECTIVE OF MANAGEMENT. PRODUCTION : To manage the reserve on the basis of utmost sustained yield, to increase the proportion of economic timber species and lesser used s pecies for the benefit of stakeholders. STRENGTH  Potential of timber resources.  Collaborative forest management through community participation.  Well trained technical staff. WEAKNESS  Inability to quantify the NTFPs in the reserve.  Delay in acquisition of permits by contractors.  Delay in payment of revenue to stakeholders.  Non - adherence to harvesting schedules.  Weak permit system for harvesting NTFPs. OPPORTUNITIES  Abundance of lesser known species that can be promoted for utilization. PROTECTION: To improve the protective functions of the forest ecosystems and ensure biodiversity conservation and environmental service functions of the reserve. STRENGTH  The reserve habours diverse flora and fauna resources.  Provision of Environmental services

35 .  Clearly defined external bou
.  Clearly defined external boundaries. WEAKNESS  Inadequate staff for protection duties in the reserve.  Weak enforcement of forest laws. OPPORTUNITIES  Potential of the reserve to have high regeneration capacity.  Possible donor support from REDD+ projects and others.  Payments for environmental services.  Potential for research. THREATS  Illegal felling and chainsaw activities.  Possibilities of annual wildfire.  Streams dry up during dry seasons negatively affecting fringe communities and wildlife and aquatic life.  Invasion of Broussonetia papyrifer a (York) and Chromolaena odorata (Acheampong). THREATS  Incidence of perennial wildfire from within and adjacent farmlands.  Over exploitation and near extinction of some timber species and NTFPs.  Non attractivenes s of existing alternative livelihood ventures for communities living around the forest reserve.  Proximity of communities to reserve.  Perception of not obtaining direct benefits from reserve. 22  Availability of market for timber and NTFPs.  Donor support for Forest and Wildlife resources management.  Expected wood tracking and verification systems under the VPA to ensure legal timber in the supply chain  Invasion of Broussonetia papyrifera (York) and Chromolaena odorata (Acheampong). Table 11: SWOT Analysis of the Protection Objective of Management. PROTECT

36 ION: To improve the protective functio
ION: To improve the protective functions of the forest ecosystems and ensure biodiversity conservation and environmental service functions of the reserve. STRENGTH  The reserve habours diverse flora and fauna resources.  Provision of Environmental services.  Clearly defined external boundaries. WEAKNESS  Inadequate staff for protection duties in the reserve.  Weak enforcement of forest laws. OPPORTUNITIES  Potential of the reserve to have high regeneration capacity.  Possible donor support from REDD+ projects and others.  Payments for environmental services.  Potential for research. THREATS  Illegal felling and chainsaw activities.  Possibilities of annual wildfi re.  Streams dry up during dry seasons negatively affecting fringe communities and wildlife and aquatic life.  Invasion of Broussonetia papyrifera (York) and Chromolaena odorata (Acheampong). TABLE 12: SWOT ANALYSIS OF THE REFORESTATION OBJECT IVE OF MANAGEMENT. REFORESTATION: To ensure the restoration of degraded forest areas through reforestation. STRENGTH  Availability forestry technical staff.  Over 5,000ha of land available for plantation development.  Availability of suitable soil and good climatic conditions. WEAKNESS  Low morale on the part of Forestry workers.  Inadequate logistics.  Non - adherence to laid down plans. OPPORTUNITIES  Investments (funds) from Priv

37 ate THREATS  Extension of admitt
ate THREATS  Extension of admitted farms. 23 developers and Government.  Willingness of the communities to embrace forest restoration efforts.  Availability of labour to participate in tree planting programs.  REDD+ initiatives.  Illegal farming by fringe communities.  Influx of migrant farmers with preference for forest reserve lands.  Invasion of Broussonetia papyrifera, Chromolaena odorata, pest and diseases. 2.2 Specific Objectives of Management Options The current management zones of the Forest Reserve is based on the RMSC i nventory and working knowledge of technical staff of the Forestry Commission. In spite of the zonation approach adopted in this plan the totality of the integrity of the Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve shall be maintained and secured by protecting, conserving a nd enhancing biodiversity as well as reforestation of the Reserve as shown in Table 13. TABLE 13: CURRENT MA NAGEMENT ZONES IN TI NTE BEPO FOREST RESERVE Zones Compartments Number Area(ha) Production 1,2,3 3 339.21 Protection (Convalescence) 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 28, 29, 30, 51, 53, 54, 80, 81, 82, 83, 87 23 2,914.84 Protection (Conversion) 8, 17, 27, 31, 32, 36, 40, 41, 50, 52, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60,61, 62, 64,63, 65, 66, 67,68, 72,73,74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 84, 85, 86, 88, 90,91, 92,93 40 5,370.46 Protection (Hill Sanctuary) 18,19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, 39, 42, 43, 44,

38 45, 46, 47,48, 49, 69, 70, 71 26 2,
45, 46, 47,48, 49, 69, 70, 71 26 2,817.16 Swampy 89 1 112.04 Total (ha) 93 11,554.00 24 2.2.1 PRODUCTION OBJECTIVE : To manage the reserve on the basis of utmost sustained yield, increase the proportion of economic timber species and lesser used species for the benefit of stakeholders. 2.2.1.1 To sustainably manage approximately 339.21ha of productive natural forest area to yi eld an estimated 7,200m 3 of harvestable volume of timber in the Reserve within three years, which has the potential of generating revenue of Sixty Three Thousand Ghana Cedis (GH¢ 63,000.00). PROTECTION OBJECTIVE: To improve the protective functions of t he forest ecosystems and ensure biodiversity conservation and environmental service functions of the reserve. 2.2.1.2 To maintain Twenty Six (26) compartments which constitute the hill sanctuary, One Compartment (1), which serves as swampy area and Twenty - Three ( 23) compartments for convalescence within the plan period. 2.2.1.3 To implement wildfire preventive measures in the entire forest reserve in collaboration with the communities. 2.2.1.4 To manage the catchment areas of the streams to improve water quality and prevent them from drying up. REFORESTATION OBJECTIVE: To ensure the restoration of degraded forest areas through reforestation. 2.2.1.5 To reforest Forty (40) degraded compartments coverin g an area of 5,370.46ha . 2.2.1.6 To manage 1,155ha of 2003 - 2007(MTS) and 2011 - 2013(NFPDP) establi

39 shed plantations. GOVERNANCE AND BE
shed plantations. GOVERNANCE AND BENEFIT SHARING OBJECTIVES: To improve forest governance through effective collaboration with all stakeholders. 2.2.1.7 Collaborate with f orest fringe communities to identify, assess and sustainably manage the harvesting of Non Timber Forest Products (NTFPs). 25 2.2.1.8 To support the implementation of alternative livelihood schemes within forest fringe communities. 2.2.1.9 To create employment opportunities for local people. 2.2.1.10 To ensure equitable sharing of revenue. 2.2.1.11 To ensure compliance of all law and regulations in the management of the reserve. 2. 3 . RESEARCH OBJECTIVES: To protect, maintain and enhance research plots within the reserve for education and other purposes. 2.3.1 To maintain compartment (1) for training and research purposes. 2.3.2 To team up with research (FORIG, RMSC) and academic (KNUST, UENR) institutions in the management and maintenance of Permanent Sample Plots (PSPs) in compartments (4, 7, 8, 11, 12, 13, 14) of the reserve and other areas of interest. 2.4. SUPPORTING AUXILLARY OBJECTIVES: To facilitate the smooth implementation of operational activities in the Forest Reserve. 2.4.1. To purchase vehicle, motorbikes to facilitate movement of staff during implementation. 2.4.2. To build Range Quarters (Bungalows) to house staff at strategic location to facilitate forest management. 26 Community members participating in the socio - economic survey Stakeholders of the Ma

40 wbia Forest Reserve participating i n th
wbia Forest Reserve participating i n the stakeholder workshop 27 PART III: MANAGEMENT PRESCRIPTION This part deals with the prescriptions for the achievement of the broad management objectives set out in the various management zones; production, protection (hill sanctuary, convalescence and swamp) and conversion) outlined in PART II. FOREST MANAGEMENT ZO NES A total of Three (3) compartments covering an area of 339.21 are to be managed for natural timber production. A total of Twenty Six (26) compartments covering an area of approximately 2,817.16ha consist of Hill Sanctuary. Twenty - three (23) compartments constitute Convalescence and Forty (40) for conversion, whiles one (1) compartment constitutes a swampy area. Details of Compartments under various categories were shown in Table 13 and F igures 3 and 4 indicate the zonation map and progress map of Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve respectively. 28 Figure 3: Zonation Map Of Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve. FIGURE 4: PROGRESS M AP FOR TINTE BEPO FO REST RESERVE. 29 3.1 PRODUCTION Main Objective: To manage the reserve on the basis of utmost sustained yield, increase the proportion of economic timber species and lesser used species for the benefit of stakeholders. 3.1.1 TIMBER PRODUCTION Objective: To sustainably manage approximately 339.21ha of produ ctive natural forest area to yield an estimated 7,200m3 of harvestable volume of timber in the Reserve within three years which has a potential of generating rev

41 enue of Sixty - Three Thousand Ghana Ce
enue of Sixty - Three Thousand Ghana Cedis (GH¢63,000.00). Management Prescription  Carry out 100% yield marking of all timber species above 50cm dbh.  Carry out enumeration checks according to MoP section D and other prescribed verification procedures.  All trees felled and stumps will be labelled and measured (full utilisable length) and data captu red on Tree Information Form (TIF) and/or appropriate data collection devices.  All logs measured and labelled as prescribed in the Logging Manual or other harvesting rules.  Log Measurement Conveyance Certificates (LMCCs) shall be issued for all trees legal ly harvested.  Post harvest checks and environmental audits shall be undertaken after logging.  Compartment Closure Certificates shall be issued after post - harvest audits. 3. 1 .2 NON - TIMBER FOREST PRODUC TS (NTFPS) Objective – Collaborate with forest fringe communities to identify, assess and sustainably manage the harvesting of Non Timber Forest Products (NTFPs). Management Prescription  Identify and document the location of all NTFPs in the Forest Reserve. 30  Undertake inventory to determine key NTFP stocking levels (quantities) and their distribution in the Reserve.  Explore the potential of propagating some of the desirable NTFPs including pestles and chewing sticks ( Nsokodua ).  Permits will be issued for collection of NTFPs.  Monitoring of NTFP harvesting activ ities in Forest Reserve shall be

42 undertaken in accordance with the harv
undertaken in accordance with the harvesting rules. 3.1. 3 NATURAL REGENERATION OPERATIONS AND ENRIC HMENT PLANTING Objective – To restock harvested or disturbed compartments (open canopies and low stocking) with desirable commercial species, and regeneration assessment carried out every two (2) years. 3.1. 3 .1 UNDERTAKE NATURAL RE GENERATION OF ECONOMICALLY DESIRAB LE TIMBER SPECIES. Management Prescription  Timber species will be assessed to determine their regenerative abili ty.  Pioneer and light demanding species will be planted in canopy openings to reduce competition.  Weeding/Ring weeding will be used to prevent growth of unwanted plants around desirable seedlings/saplings.  For targeted shade bearers, conditions of low light intensity shall be created and reduction of competition through partial thinning in and around areas with high incidence of natural regeneration shall be adopted. 3.1. 3 .2 UNDERTAKE ENRICHMENT PLANTING. Management Prescription  Abandoned log yards an d skid tracks that have been opened up or experienced excessive soil compaction over the years will be planted with suitable tree species. 31  Planting of non - pioneer light demanders, (e.g. Antiaris toxicaria, Anthrocaryon micraster, etc) in skid tracks.  Planting of pioneers (e.g. Ceiba pentandra Celtis spp . ) would be used in log yards and road verges. 3.1. 3 .3 UNDERTAKE COPPICE MA NAGEMENT. Management Prescription Trees stumps of

43 species such as Ceiba and Wawa, which h
species such as Ceiba and Wawa, which have potential to coppice after harvesti ng will be monitored and coppiced shoots managed. 3.2 PROTECTION Main Objective: To improve the protective functions of the forest ecosystems and ensure biodiversity conservation and environmental service functions of the Reserve. 3.2.1 BOUNDARY PROTECTI ON Objective – To maintain the external and internal boundaries of the Reserve. Management Prescription  Erect Reserve Sign Post at key entry points of the reserve.  Identify defaced, broken and missing boundary pillars.  Replacement of defaced, broken and missing boundary pillars within the first five years of the plan period.  Clean and patrol a total external boundary perimeter of 64.20km twice a year.  Plant 34km of external and 10.56km of internal boundaries with desirable tree species each year within th e plan period.  Prosecute forest offenders at the law court and maintain proper documentation. 3.2.2 FOREST BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION (FLORA AND FAUNA) Objective – To safeguard individual species using fine grain protection measures and exemption from expl oitation. Management Prescription 32  Protect key (star rated) species identified in the Forest Reserve areas and conduct enrichment planting where necessary.  Study the natural regeneration of potential timber species.  Tend natural regenerated timber seedlings to enhance growth.  Identify environmental factors enhanc

44 ing and limiting regeneration ability of
ing and limiting regeneration ability of the species.  Enforce hunting regulation during the close season. 3.2.3 HILL SANCTUARY Objective – To protect the entire hilly area of the Reserve comprising of 26 compartments for ecological value for both flora and fauna. Management Prescription  Collection of NTFPS will be restricted to domestic use.  No logging will be allowed in this area.  Encroachment will not be entertained. 3.2.4 SWAMP AREA Objective – To protect the swamp area of the Reserve comprising 112.04ha. Management Prescription  No logging will be allowed in this area.  Hunting of wildlife will be restricted.  Trees located within 25m and 50m at both banks of streams will not be allowed for felling . 3.2.5 WATERSHED MANAGEMENT Objective – To manage the catchment areas of the streams to improve water quality, ensure continuous flow of water along the streams and prevent them from drying up. Management Prescription  Maintain water flow and reduce sedimentation of the streams within the Reserve by planting fast growing, evergreen trees with high water - use efficiency, and fire resistant tree species along the banks of streams at 33 appropriate off - set distances. Tree speci es such as subaha is recommendable for this buffer planting.  Ensure that no tree is felled within 50m on both sides of streams and 25m on both sides of streams as prescribed in the logging manual.  Undertake regular mon

45 itoring of buffer zones of the streams .
itoring of buffer zones of the streams . 3.2.6 WILDFIRE MANAGEMENT Objective – To implement wildfire preventive measures in the entire Forest Reserve in collaboration with the communities. Management Prescription  Pre - suppression activities shall include clearing of firebreaks, fire tracing, and early burning.  Form and organize Fire Volunteer Squads (FVS) for the fringe communities through collaboration with FC, GNFS and the District Assembly.  Construct and maintain fire rides to control any incidence of wildfires.  Educate and sensitize commun ities on the need to prevent wildfires. 3.2.7 MANAGEMENT OF INVASI VE SPECIES Objective – Eradicate invasive species Management Prescription Chemical treatment (glyphosphate - based) will be used for the eradication of Broussonetia papyrifera (York) and Chro molaena odorata (Acheampong) which have invaded some open patches in the Reserve. 3.3 REFORESTATION Main Objective: To ensure the restoration of degraded forest through reforestation. 3.3.1 REFORESTATION OF DEG RADED AREA. Objective – To reforest forty (40) degraded compartments covering an area of 5,370.46ha. Management Prescription 34  Surveying and physically delineating the selected compartments for plantation.  Land preparation will be untaken through slashing by cutlass and felling of shrubs will take place between January and March of each planting year. Care will be taken to prevent the destruction of sui

46 table regeneration of niches and isolat
table regeneration of niches and isolated indigenous tree species. Land preparation by fire will not be permitted.  Pegging shall be done between Marc h and May at a spacing of 8m X 8m (156/ha) for exotic species such as Cedrella and 4m X 4m (625/ha) for indigenous species.  Planting materials will be of healthy potted and bare rooted seedlings. Recommended seedlings include native tree species such as Of ram, Emire, Ceiba Wawa and Mansonia, and exotic species such as Cedrella odorata .  Planting of tree seedlings shall be done between April and August.  Tending/Maintenance operations shall be done to facilitate the proper growth of trees and prevent the harbo uring of pest. Weeding at planned intervals using prescribed procedures.  Survival survey shall be carried out after the completion of the annual planting out.  Beating up shall be carried out where mortality is high. 3.3.2 MAINTENANCE OF ESTAB LISHED PLANTAT IONS. Objective – To manage 1,155ha of 2003 - 2007 (MTS) and 2011 - 2013 (NFPDP) established plantations. Management Prescription  Carry out tending and prunning of all established plantation areas.  Maintain fire rides around plantation to prevent any perennial wildfires.  Carry out fire patrol during dry season around the plantation areas in the reserve.  Thinning operations shall be carried out according to MoP C for Plantations.  Harvesting operations shall be carried out in accordance with prescription in the

47 M oP C for Plantations. 35 3.4
M oP C for Plantations. 35 3.4 GOVERNANCE AND BENEF IT SHARING Main Objective: To improve forest governance through effective collaboration with all stakeholders. 3.4.1 ADMITTED FARMS Objective – To manage twenty - two (22) admitted farms covering an area of 83.6 ha Management Prescription  Identify all blocked boundaries of the 22 admitted farms by the end of the third year of the plan period.  Opening up of all the blocked boundaries of the 22 admitted farms by the end of the third year of the plan period.  Check survey the 22 admitted farms every two (2) years to ensure that they are not illegally extended.  Pillaring of the 22 admitted farms by the end of the five (5) year of the plan period.  Maintenance of 22 admitted farms boundaries as per maintenance schedule. 3.4. 2 COMMUNAL / DOMESTIC RIGHTS Objective – To ensure that domestic and communal rights are fully respected. Management Prescription.  Forest fringe communities shall have regulated access to the Reserve to collect NTFPs for domestic use.  Permit will have to be obtained from the FSD before NTFP can be harvested on commercial quantities.  Communities will have free access to undertake health walk through the reserve and enjoy aesthetic value of the forest.  Benefit sharing arrangements shall follow the p rovisions specified in FC - Benefit Sharing Agreement Documents for commercial forest plantation development under the Public Priva

48 te Partnership. 36  The commu
te Partnership. 36  The communities living around the Forest Reserve shall be given opportunities for employment and training. The rights of workers to organize and voluntarily negotiate with their employers shall be guaranteed as outlined in conventions 87 and 98 of the ILO. 3.4. 3 ALTERNATIVE LIVELIHO OD INTERVENTIONS Objective – To facilitate the establishment of livelihood interventions appropriate in the forest fringe communities to improve their living standard. Management Prescription  Develop appropriate alternate livelihood options in consultation with the communities such as snail farming, livestock, kente and basket we aving.  Formation of alternative livelihood groups in communities.  Training of communities in their preferred alternative livelihood options shall be facilitated.  Monitor and supervise alternative livelihood options established for communities to ensure the ir success. 3.4. 4 LAW ENFORCEMENT Objective – To ensure compliance of all law and regulations in the management of the Reserve. Management Prescription  Make use of existing systems (VPA - LAS system/Rapid response/FC Prosecutors/Police) towards effective forest and wildlife surveillance. 3.4. 5 BENEFIT SHARING Objective – To ensure equitable sharing of revenue. Management Prescription  Ensure that the socio - economic needs of the forest fringe communities, particularly Social Responsibility Agreement (SRA) c ommitment is met in full

49 for the benefit of the people. 37
for the benefit of the people. 37 3.5 RESEARCH PRESCRIPTIO NS To protect, maintain and enhance research plots within the reserve for education and other purposes. Research and education – The Reserve serves as a host to students (espe cially tertiary institutions) on educational tours to enrich their knowledge on forest management activities. Objective – To protect the plots for continuous monitoring of the dynamics of the Reserve. Management Prescription  Maintain and protect One (1) Compartment for Students research  All PSPs pillars within the Forest Reserve shall be maintained and removed/broken ones will be replaced with assistance from RMSC.  Conduct research into the regeneration ability of the Reserve especially in the Convalescen ce Areas.  Demarcate and pillar permanent sample plots (PSPs).  Undertake research into flora and fauna dynamics overtime, to inform management decision.  Sensitize fringe communities on the Protection of Research Sites (PSPS). Support / General Activities 3.6 Infrastructural Development 3.6.1 ROAD AND TRACK NETWO RK: To provide access to forest for staff and stakeholder to facilitate the effective implementation of this plan. Management Prescription  The Reserve has arterial routes used by timber trucks in an d out of the reserve. However, maintenance of access roads and hauling tracks shall be carried out by the permit holders.  All roads within the reserve will be designed a

50 nd constructed in accordance with the c
nd constructed in accordance with the conditions and specifications given in the Loggin g Manual and harvesting rules of the FC. 38  Road construction within compartments shall only be carried out after stock survey has been completed and yield has been allocated and approved. 3.6.2 BUILDING: To provide accommodation for field staff. Management Prescription.  Constructions of Three (3) Range Quarters are proposed to be constructed at Wioso, Abesewa and Brosankro to accommodate Range Supervisors.  Construction of temporary structures for the FC Rapid Response Teams, to re - enforce protection of the Forest Reserve. 3.6.3 LOGISTICS One (1) official pick up vehicle and three (3) Motorbikes are needed to support operational duties in the management of the Forest Reserve. 3.6.4 TELECOMMUNICATION MA ST There are five (5) telecommunication mass of the various services providers in compartment 59 of the Forest Reserve. Management Prescription  FSD shall collaborate with the Service Providers (Vodafone, Tigo, MTN, Airtel and Glo) to protect the Reserve through fire patrols in the dry season. 3.6.5 OFFICE E QUIPMENTS: To provide Office equipment and consumables 3.7 Health and Safety for Field Operations Objective – To develop a working culture to support health and safety at work and promote a positive social climate and smooth operation that enhance producti vity. Management Prescription  Undertake training and capacity building so that ma

51 nagers, supervisors and all workers und
nagers, supervisors and all workers understand their responsibilities with respect to health and safety. 39  Classify all field operations and activities and the level of associat ed safety risk and appropriate measures for reducing such risk as depicted in the logging manual.  Develop plans to ensure that all activities are backed by relevant legislation and best safe working practice, especially as they relate to forest operations and operational planning.  Ensure that logging companies meet health and safety requirements.  Monitor compliance including maintaining records of accidents and undertake regular management reviews.  Provide readily available health care access in the form of First Aid tool kit for working foresters in the field. 40 PART IV: PLAN IMPLEMENTATION, MONITORING AND EVALUATION 4.1 Management Plan Implementation The implementation of this plan will be operationalized through an Annual Programme of Work (APW) which wil l also form the basis for monitoring and evaluating the prescribed treatments assigned to the various management zones, that is production, protection (hill sanctuary, convalescence, swamp) and conversion. 4.1.1 IMPLEMENTATION ARRAN GEMENTS This section covers activity scheduling, costing of operations and allocation of responsibilities and resources for the implementation of the management plan over the stated period. Prescribed treatments to be executed in the production, protection, and reforestation z ones

52 are outlined in Tables 14, 15 and 16.
are outlined in Tables 14, 15 and 16. TABLE 14: IMPLEMENTA TION ARRANGEMENT FOR PRODUCTION ZONE (2016 - 2026) Prescribed Treatment Unit of Measurement Quantity Implementing Unit/ Institution Remarks Compartment survey and pillaring Km FSD Quantity estimated using 3 compartments each with an average perimeter of 4.8km. Labour will be engaged from Forest Fringe Communities (FFC). Harvesting Operations (Felling operations) No. of Compts. 3 FSD/ TUC holders Labour will be engaged from FFC. Post - harvest Assessment Number of Compts. 3 FSD/RMSC Labour will be engaged from FFC. Inducing Natural Regeneration Number of Compts. 5 FSD/RMSC Collaborate with FORIG, communities, Academia Enrichment planting No. of Compts 23 (2,914.84ha) FSD, RMSC, FORIG FFC will be engaged in labour work. Cultivation of selected NTFPs Ha - FSD Collaborate with RMSC and Communities. Sensitization of communities on TUC holder’s SRA commitments No. of Communities. 23 FSD/RMSC Collaborate with Landowners / Traditional Authorities / Key communities. 41 Prescribed Treatment Unit of Measurement Quantity Implementing Unit/ Institution Remarks Develop alternative Livelihood intervention. No. of Communities. 10 FSD/RMSC/ NGO,CSO Skills development and Entrepreneurship training necessary. Collaboration with FFC/ NGOs and Private inv

53 estors are necessary. Implement healt
estors are necessary. Implement health and safety measures Prescribed treatment Unit Quantity Implementing Unit/Institution Remarks Reserve sign posting number of posts 20 FSD Targeted at key reserve entry and exit points. Labour will be engaged from FFC External boundary maintenance (perimeter) km 64.62 FSD Labour will be engaged from FFC External boundary planting (perimeter) km 64.62 FSD Labour will be engaged from FFC Fire ride construction km - FSD Will be determined by reforestation programme. Wildfire pre - suppression ha 11,554 FSD Annually on the onset of dry season. Wildfire Education number of communities 20 FSD Collaborate with TA, GNFS, Media, District Assemblies. Management of 22 admitted farms. Km 10.56 FSD Labour will be engaged from FFC for check survey, pillaring of farms, internal boundary maintenance. Implement Health and Safety measures number of personnel 100 FSD, RMSC, FORIG Training in Health and Safety for management and field workers. Number of Persons . 100 FSD/RMSC Collaborate with Permit Holders in organizing training in health and safety measure for management, field staff, contractors. TABLE 15: IMPLEMENTA TION ARRANGEMENT FOR PROTECTION ZONE (2016 - 2026) Prescribed treatment Unit Quantity Implementing Unit/Institution Remarks Reserve sign posting number of

54 posts 20 FSD Targeted at key r
posts 20 FSD Targeted at key reserve entry and exit points. Labour will be engaged from FFC External boundary maintenance (perimeter) km 64.62 FSD Labour will be engaged from FFC External boundary planting (perimeter) km 64.62 FSD Labour will be engaged from FFC Fire ride construction km - FSD Will be determined by reforestation programme. Wildfire pre - suppression ha 11,554 FSD Annually on the onset of dry season. 42 Wildfire Education number of communitie s 20 FSD Collaborate with TA, GNFS, Media,District Assemblies. Management of 22 admitted farms. Km 10.56 FSD Labour will be engaged from FFC for check survey, pillaring of farms, internal boundary maintenance. Implement Health and Safety measures number of personnel 100 FSD, RMSC, FORIG Training in Health and Safety for management and field workers. TABLE 16: IMPLEMENTATION ARRAN GEMENT FOR REFORESTATION ZONE ( 2016 - 2026) Prescribed treatment Unit of Measurement Quantity Implementing Unit/Institution Remarks Plantation Establishment ha 5,370.46 FSD Quantity estimated for Conversion zone. Labour will be engaged from FFC. Maintenance ha 1,155 FSD/ Private Developers / TUC holders Quantity estimated for plantation. FC will provide technical guidance where necessary. Labour will be engaged from FFC. Plantation Assessment of harvestabl

55 e areas ha 1,016 FSD Applicab
e areas ha 1,016 FSD Applicable to MTS 2003 - 2009 - 2007 established plantations & 2011 -- 201 - 2013 Ecotech plantations Plantation thinning ha 10 FSD This is applicable to only the existing/ established plantation areas that are potentially harvestable in the near future. Wildfire Prevention, Pre - suppression Suppression. number of communities 23 FSD Collaboration with TUC holders/GNFS/ Communities/NADM O in fire prevention programmes. Number of fire volunteer squads 50 FSD 10 Communities with 5 members each. Collaborate with FFC/ District Assemblies/ GNFS in training of 43 Prescribed treatment Unit of Measurement Quantity Implementing Unit/Institution Remarks FVS. 4.2 Costs and Revenue Flow Distribution 4.2.1 COST ESTIMATES TABLE 17: COST ESTIMATES TINTE BEPO FOREST RESERVE – MANAGEMENT PLAN 2016 - 2026 ESTIMATED COST TABLE Prescription Unit Institution Target Period Estimated Cost 3.1 PRODUCTION: To manage the reserve on the basis of utmost sustained yield and to increase the proportion of economic timber species, non - timber produce and lesser used species for the benefit of stakeholders. 3.1.1 To sustainably manage approximately 339.21ha of productive natural forest area to yield an estimated 7,200m3 of harvestable volume of timber in the Reserve within three years which has a potential of generating revenue of Sixty - Th

56 ree Thousand Ghana Cedis (GH¢63,000.
ree Thousand Ghana Cedis (GH¢63,000.00). No. FC 3 3 Years 77,020.50 3.1.2 To restock harvested or disturbed compartments (open canopies and low stocking) with desirable commercial species, and regeneration assessment carried out every two (2) years. Inducing Natural Regeneration (ha) ha FC/Fringe Communities 2,914.84 Throughout plan implementation period. 539,880.80 TOTAL PRODUCTION 616,901.30 3.2 PROTECTION: To improve the protective functions of the forest ecosystems and ensure biodiversity conservation and environmental service functions of the reserve. 3.2.1 To maintain the external and internal boundaries of the Reserve. No. FC 64.62 Throughout plan implementation period. 55,747.25 3.2.2 To safeguard individual species using fine grain protection measures and exemption from exploitation. No. FC Throughout plan implementation period. 60,000.00 44 TINTE BEPO FOREST RESERVE – MANAGEMENT PLAN 2016 - 2026 ESTIMATED COST TABLE Prescription Unit Institution Target Period Estimated Cost 3.2.3 To protect the entire hilly area of the Reserve comprising of 26 compartments for ecological value for both flora and fauna. ha FC 2,817.16 Throughout plan implementation period. 15,000.00 3.2.4 To protect the swamp area of the Reserve comprising 112.04ha. ha FC 112.04 Throughout plan implementation period. 15,000.00 3.2.5 To manage the catchment areas of the s

57 treams to improve water quality, ensur
treams to improve water quality, ensure continuous flow of water along the streams and prevent them from drying up. No. FC Whole Reserve Throughout plan implementation period. 20,000.00 3.2.6 To implement wildfire preventive measures in the entire Forest Reserve in collaboration with the communities. No. FC Whole Reserve Throughout plan implementation period. 80,000.00 3.2.7 To eradicate invasive species No. FC Whole Reserve Throughout plan implementation period. 20,000.00 TOTAL PROTECTION 265,747.25 3.3 REFORESTATION: To ensure the restoration of degraded forest areas through reforestation. 3.3.1 To reforest forty (40) degraded compartments covering an area of 5,370.46ha. ha FC 5,370. 46 Throughout plan implementat ion period 431,206,911. 50 3.3.2 To manage 1,155ha of 2003 - 2007 (MTS) and 2011 - 2013 (NFPDP) established ha FC 1,155 Throughout plan implementat ion period 8,378,213.00 TOTAL REFORESTATION 439,585,124. 50 3.4 GOVERNANCE AND BENEFIT SHARING: To improve forest governance through effective collaboration with all stakeholders. 3.4.1 To manage twenty - two (22) admitted farms covering an area of 83.6ha No. FC 22 Throughout plan implementat ion period. 64,232.00 45 TINTE BEPO FOREST RESERVE – MANAGEMENT PLAN 2016 - 2026 ESTIMATED COST TABLE Prescription Unit Institution Target Period Estimated Cost 3.4.2 To collaborate

58 with forest fringe communities to ide
with forest fringe communities to identify, assess and sustainably manage the harvesting of Non Timber Forest Products (NTFPs). No. FC 10 Throughout plan implementat ion period. 70,000.00 3.4.3 To ensure that domestic and communal rights are fully respected. No. FC 20 Throughout plan implementat ion period. 18,000.00 3.4.4 To facilitate the establishment of livelihood interventions appropriate in the forest fringe communities to improve their living standard. No. FC 10 Throughout plan implementat ion period. 35,000.00 3.4.5 To ensure compliance of all law and regulations in the management of the Reserve. No. FC 23 Throughout plan implementat ion period. 10,000.00 3.4.6 To ensure equitable sharing of revenue. No. FC 23 Throughout plan implementat ion period. 10,000.00 TOTAL GOVERNANCE 207,232.00 3.5 RESEARCH: To protect, maintain and enhance research plots within the reserve for education and other purposes. 3.5.1 To protect, maintain and enhance research plots within the reserve for education and other purposes. No. FC - FSD, FORIG, RMSC 11 Throughout plan implementat ion period. 72,500.00 TOTAL RESEARCH 72,500.00 3.6 SUPPORT/GENERAL ACTIVITIES: To facilitate the smooth implementation of operational activities in the Forest Reserve. 46 TINTE BEPO FOREST RESERVE – MANAGEMENT PLAN 2016 - 2026 ESTIMATED COST TABLE Prescription Unit Ins

59 titution Target Period Estimated
titution Target Period Estimated Cost 3.6.1 To provide access to forest for staff ans stakeholder to facilitate the effective implementation of this plan. km FC/NG O/ DONO RS Throughout plan implementat ion period. 200,000.00 3.6.2 To provide accommodation for field staff. No. FC/NG O/ DONO RS 3 Throughout plan implementat ion period. 230,000.00 3.6.3 To provide adequate means of transportation for FSD staff to facilitate the effective implementation of this plan. No. FC/NG O/ DONO RS 1 Throughout plan implementat ion period. 150,000.00 3.6.4 To assist Telecoms to provide network services to all and sundry. No. FC/NG O/ DONO RS Throughout plan implementat ion period. 40,000.00 3.6.5 To provide Office equipment and consumables. No. FC/NG O/ DONO RS Throughout plan implementat ion period. 30,500.00 3.7 To develop a working cultures to support health and safety at work and promote a positive social climate and smooth operation that enhance productivity. No. FC/NG O/ DONO RS Throughout plan implementat ion period. 18,500.00 TOTAL SUPPORT/GENERA L ACTIVITIES 669,000.00 GRAND TOTAL 1,831,380.55 NB: Detail budget is attached as Appendix 9. 47 4.2.2 SOURCES OF REVENUE Potential sources of revenue flow for Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve are varied. The following are the major sources of revenue.  Stumpage Fees : Determined by the rate per specie

60 s and total allocated yield of timber t
s and total allocated yield of timber trees and on the assumption that all yield will be harvested.  Concession Rent : Rate is fixed by Legislative Instrument and the current value is GH¢0.12/ha/year for Off - Reserve and G䢢 0.15 for Forest Reserve.  Plantation Revenue : Revenue accruing from already established plantation.  NTFPs fees : Mainly derived from harvesting of pestles, chew - sticks, medicinal plants, fire wood, etc. Others sources will be the following:  Timber Rights Fe e (TRF)  Social Responsibility Agreements (SRAs)  Payment of Environmental Services (PES)  Service charge  Carbon Credits  Ground Rent (Private Plantation Developers) 4.2.3 REVENUE PREDICTION TABLE 18: SUMMARY OF REVENUE PREDICTION FOR THE F IRST 5 YEARS (2016 - 2021) OF THE PLANNED PERIOD SOURCE 1 st YEAR 䝈ꈀ 2 nd YEAR 䝈ꈀ 3 rd YEAR 䝈ꈀ 4 th YEAR 䝈ꈀ 5 th YEAR 䝈ꈀ TOTAL 䝈ꈀ Stumpage 21,000.0 0 21,000. 00 21,000.00 - - 63,000.00 TRF - - - - - - SRA - - - - - - Rent - - - - - - NTFP ’ s - - - - - - 48 Total 21,000.0 0 21,000. 00 21,000.00 - - 63,000.00 NB: USING THE ABUNDA NT SPP, CELTIS AS PR OXY; 2,400M 3 (ANNUALLY) X 8.75 (C URRENT STUMPAGE RATE ) =21,000 .00 4.2.4 REVENUE DISBUR SEMENT ARRANGEMENT TABLE 19: SUMMARY OF PREDICTED REVENUE DISBURSEMENT ARRANGEMENT FOR THE FIRST 5 YEAR S (2016 - 2021

61 ) OF THE PLANNED PERIOD. Source of
) OF THE PLANNED PERIOD. Source of Revenu e Total expecte d GH¢ Beneficiaries and % share (GH¢) FC (50%) OASL (10%) District Assembly (55%) Stool land (25%) Traditio nal Council (20%) Stumpag e 63,000.0 0 31,500. 00 3,150. 00 15,592.50 7,087.5 0 5,670.00 TRF - - - - - - SRA - - - - - - RENT - - - - - - Service Charge - - - - - - NTFP ’ s - - - - - - Carbon Credit - - - - - - Plantatio n Revenue - - - - - - Notes: Concessionaires whose permits have not expired are not active in the Reserve. 4.2.5 FUNDING SOURCES For the implementation of this management plan, possible sources of funding are:  Forestry Commission (Internal Generated Fund).  Government of Ghana (GoG)  Loans and Grants. 49  Management Charges (50% of Stumpage).  Public – Private Partnership (PPP).  Development Partners.  Service Charges and Fees. 4.3 MONITORING, EVALUATI ON AND REVIEW A formal and systematic monitoring system will be put in place to ensu re the comparison of actual performance against the target. The aims of monitoring, analysis and reporting on progress shall be to achieve the prescriptions as follows: Provide information for the future revision of the plan. Provide information for the evaluation of the management plan or its prescription. Two (2) main approaches for monitoring and evaluation will be ad

62 opted: Periodic monitoring: This wi
opted: Periodic monitoring: This will involve making comparisons between physical achievements and programm e targets and between financial expenditure and budgets at the end of specific time periods, for example, monthly, quarterly, yearly or longer periods. Continuous monitoring: It will apply to specified key indicators which will enable information on plan implementation to be collected at pre - determined intervals. This provides a Forest Manager with the means of applying close control over forest operations enabling frequent comparisons to be made between planned programmes and inputs of resources with actu al achievements and inputs. A key mechanism for monitoring legal sourcing of wood, timber production and harvesting compliance will include the use of the Wood Tracking System (WTS) which has been designed as part of the Legality Assurance System of the V PA. 4.3.1 MONITORING STRATEGIE S Since FC is acting as agents for the land owners and the nation in the management, protection and development of the forest resources, there is the need for a monitoring and evaluation framework whereby the FC’s performance with respect to the implementation of this plan can be measured. A three - tier monitoring structure is proposed at the district, regional and national levels. Table 20 below indicates the 50 standards and procedures to be used for measuring/monitoring the eff ectiveness of the institutions responsible for the execution of the Forest Reserve management plan. TABLE 2

63 0: MONITORING AND EVALU ATION FRAMEWOR
0: MONITORING AND EVALU ATION FRAMEWORK. Production Objective: To manage the reserve on the basis of utmost sustained yield, to increase the proporti on of economic timber species, and lesser used species for the benefit of stakeholders. Prescribed Treatments Indicators of Achievement Means of Verification Frequency Responsible Institution /Unit Sustainable timber harvest - Yield Marking - Timber production statistics - Annual report Annually MLNR and FC Compartment survey and pillaring - Surveyed compartments - Erected pillars of prescribed standards - Adherence to compartment schedules - Approved schedules - Field assessment reports/Observations - Stock survey reports Annually RMSC/FSD Harvesting operations Adherence to harvesting procedures: - Labelling/ marking of logs and stumps - Harvesting within permitted yield - Reduced logging damage - Adherence to logging plan. - TIF production report - Compartment felling register - Felling inspection report - Production data reconciliation reports - Weekly - Monthly - Monthly - Monthly FSD, TVD Post harvest assessment - Reduced environmental damage - Properly closed compartments - Post harvest assessment report - Compartment closure certificate RMSC, FSD, TVD Inducing natural regeneration i. Area regenerated ii. Improved stocking levels iii. Increased n

64 umbers of tree species Field assessm
umbers of tree species Field assessment reports (sites, area and species planted) Quarterly RMSC, FSD Enrichment planting - Area planted - Improved stocking levels - Increased numbers of tree species Field assessment reports/observations Half yearly RMSC, FSD Cultivation and sustainable use of selected NTFPs - Area surveyed and demarcated - Cultivated NTFPs Developed guidelines for NTFP harvest and use. - Field assessment reports/ observations - NTFP production and utilization guidelines Within Planned Period RMSC, FSD Socio - economic interventions - Number of alternative livelihood options developed and Implemented. - Project reports - Evidence of Within Planned Period FC - FSD, NGO 51 Prescribed Treatments Indicators of Achievement Means of Verification Frequency Responsible Institution /Unit - Number of job opportunities created for local communities. employment. Protection Objective: To improve the protective functions of the forest ecosystems and ensure biodiversity conservation and environmental service functions of the reserve Prescribed Treatments Indicators of Achievement Means of Verification Frequency Responsible Institution/ Unit Sign Posting of Forest Reserve Number of sign post erected. Physical inspection of Posts. Yearly FSD Boundary maintenance - Boundary maintenance. sched

65 ule - Length (km) of reserve bound
ule - Length (km) of reserve boundary cleaned and inspected. - Boundary maintenance reports. - District monthly reports Monthly FSD/RMSC Boundary planting Length (km) of reserve boundary planted. District monthly reports. Monthly FSD/RMSC Fire ride construction - Length (km) of fire ride constructed - Evidence of contracts awarded for construction of fire rides. - Field inspection reports - Contract documents/paymen ts. - Half yearly - Annually FSD/RMSC/ Community Wildfire Pre - Suppression Length (km) of reserve boundary planted - Field inspection reports - District monthly report - Half yearly - Monthly FSD/RMSC/ Community Wildfire education Number of communities sensitized District monthly report Monthly FSD/RMSC/ Community/ GNFS Check survey and pillaring of 22 Admitted Farms - Area of admitted farm check surveyed. - Number of admitted farms inspected. i. Field inspection reports. ii. District monthly reports. iii. District Permit records. i. Half yearly ii. Monthly FSD/ RMSC/ Community 52 Reforestation Objective: To ensure the restoration of degraded forest areas through reforestation. Prescribed Treatments Indicators of Achievement Means of Verification Frequency Responsible Institution/ Unit Establishment - Degraded sites surveyed and demarcated - Site prepared and ar

66 ea planted - Number of species pl
ea planted - Number of species planted - Quantity of planting materials (seedlings) raised - planting success recorded - Beating up conducted - Survey reports - Maps - Annually - Within planned Period FC - FSD Maintenance - Weeding regime followed - Prepared and approved schedules Field/Inspection reports Periodic FSD Harvesting operations Compliance with harvesting controls: Approved thinning regime Thinning reports Field/Inspection reports At least once in the planned period FSD Cultivation and sustainable use of selected NTFPs - Area surveyed and demarcated - Cultivated NTFPs Developed guidelines for NTFP harvest and use - Field assessment/ inspection reports - NTFP production and utilization guidelines Annually FSD/NGO Wildfire management - Reduction in the incidence of fires - Low level of fire damage - Number of trained fire volunteer squads - Number of communities sensitized - Field assessment reports - GNFS reports Annually FSD/RMSC/ GNFS/ District Assemblies/ Community 4.3.1.1 CRITERIA FOR REVIEW Review of performance will take three forms. These are stated as follows:  Annual Review of performance; will be done every year using the annual target to establish work progress for a particular.  Mid - term review of performance for the entire management plan (2021) and  Unpredictable circumstances s

67 uch as Change in forest condi tion.
uch as Change in forest condi tion. Change in forest and Wildlife Policy. 53 Change in global trends and issues in forestry. Adverse environmental occurrences beyond human control (flood, wildfires, etc). Change in status of some compartments in the hill sanctuary protection area must be given critical consideration. A final review of performance when the plan period of the management planning process is completed (2027). REFERENCES  Forestry Department(1993), Tinte Bepo Reserve Working Plan (1957 - 1962)  Forestry Department(1993), Tinte Bepo Reserve Working Plan (1993 - 2012)  Hall, J.B. and Swaine, M.D. (1981). Geobotany 1: Distribution and Ecology of Vascular Plants in Tropical Rain Forest - Forest Vegetation in Ghana. Junk publishers, The Hague, The Netherlands. 383pp.  Hawthorne, W.D. & A bu Juam, (1995) Forest Protection in Ghana (with particular reference to vegetation and plants) IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK. 203pp  Blackett, H.L. 1989. Inventory techniques. In Wong, J.L. (Ed) Seminar Proceedings, Forest Inventory Project . Overseas Development Administration (UK) and Forestry Department, Ghana.  Hawthorne, W.D. & Abu Juam, 1995. Forest Protection in Ghana (with particular reference to vegetation and plant species). IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, U.K. xvii +203 pp.  Hawthorne, W.D., 1994. Fire Damage and Forest Regeneration in Ghana. Natural Resources Institute, Chatham, U.K. 

68 RMSC 2015, Fauna Survey Report of
RMSC 2015, Fauna Survey Report of Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve, WD Unit, Kumasi.  RMSC 2015, Flora Survey of Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve, EC Unit, Kumasi.  RMSC 2015, Report on Socio - Economic Survey for Selected Fringe Communities Around Tinte - Bepo Forest Reserve In The Mankranso Forest District , CRMU, Kumasi 54  Taylor C.J. 1960. Synecology and Silviculture in Ghana. Thomas Nelson and Sons Ltd., E dinburgh. 418pp. 55 APPENDICES APPENDIX 1a : Schedule Description of boundaries MAIN BLOCK The area of land, of approximately 14 square miles, situate in the Kumasi District of Ashanti, of which the boundaries are as shown edged pink on a plan numbered X 646 signed on behalf of the Director of Surveys on the 22 nd day of August, 1929 and deposit ed with the Director of surveys. EAST BLOCK Commencing from F.R.B.P.43 of the Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve Main Block which is the same as B.P.No.1 the boundary is a cut line on a bearing of 152 0 for a distance of 70.00 chains to B.P.3 passing through B.P.2; thence a line cut on a bearing of 212 0 for a distance of 14.50 chains to B.P.4; thence a line cut on a bearing of 157 0 for a distance of 25.50 chains to B.P.5; thence a line cut on a bearing of 64 0 for a distance of 15 chains to B.P.6; thence a line cut on a bearing of 152 0 for a distance of 26.00 chains to B.P..7; thence a line cut on a bearing of 81 0 30’ for a distance of 39.50 chains to B.P.No.8; thence a line cut on a bearing

69 of 219 0 30’ for a d istance of 24
of 219 0 30’ for a d istance of 24 chains to B.P.9; thence a line cut on a bearing of 146 0 for a distance of 24.50 chains to B.P. No.10; thence a line cut on a bearing of 262 0 30’ for a distance of 19.50 chains to B.P.No.11; thence a line cut on a bearing of 152 0 for a distan ce of 38.00 chains to B.P. No.12; thence a line cut on a bearing of 298 0 for a distance of 28.00 chains to B.P.No.13; thence a line out on a bearing of 241 0 30’for a distance of 18 chains to B.P.No.14; thence a line cut on a bearing of 154 for a distance of 40 chains to B.P.No.15; thence a line cut on a bearing of 101 0 30 for a distance of 46.50 chains to B.P.No.16; thence a line cut on a bearing of 152 0 for a distance of 140 chains to B.P.No.20; thence a line cut on a bearing of 228 0 for a distance of 120.0 0 chains to B.P.23; thence a line cut on a bearing of 307 0 for a distance of 241.28 chains to B.P.No.29; thence a line cut on a bearing of 272 0 30’ for a distance of 131.70 chains passing through B.P.Nos.30 and 31 to B.P.No.34 of the Tinte Bepo Forest R eserve (Main Block); thence the boundary follows the Eastern Boundary of the Tinte Bepo 56 Forest Reserve Main Block in a North - easterly direction through B.P.Nos.35, 36, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41 and 42 to No.43 which is the same as No.1, the point of commencement. WEST BLOCK Commencing at B.P.15 of Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve (Main Block) a line cut on a bearing of 290 0 for a distance of 215.52 chains to B.P.5; the

70 nce on a bearing of 334 0 30’for a d
nce on a bearing of 334 0 30’for a distance of 511.61 chains to B.P.17 situated on the Bechem – Tepa Motor Road; thence following the said Motor Road in the direction of Bechem for a distance of 32.87 chains to B.P.18; thence a line cut on a bearing of 105 0 for a distance of 170.83 chains to B.P.22; thence on a bearing of 155 0 30’ for a dist ance of 128.28 chains to B.P.25; thence on a bearing of 106 0 for a distance of 159.48 chains to B.P.29; thence on a bearing of 44 0 30’ for a distance of 10.73 chains to B.P.30; thence on a bearing of 123 0 for a distance of 44.96 chains to B.P.31; thence on a bearing of 188 0 30’ for a distance of 65.84 chains to B.P.33; thence on a bearing of 110 0 for a distance of 90.61 chains to B.P.9 of the Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve (Main Block) and thence following the boundary of the said Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve in a South - westerly direction for a distance of 249.11 chains to B.P.15, the point of commencement. All bearings are approximate and are referred to True North. All distances are more or less. Made by Resolution of the Kumasi Native Authority at a meeting at Kumasi, on th e 15th day of December, 1949. 57 APPENDIX 1B: TINTE BEPO FOREST RE SERVE BOUNDARY MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE MONTH BP - BP DISTANCE (KM) FARMS DISTANCE(KM) TOTAL PERIMETER Jan. & July Feb. & Aug. March & Sept. April & Oct. May & Nov. June & Dec. 10.77 10.77 10.77 10.77 10.77 10.77 -

71 - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - - - - - - - - TOTAL 64.20 58 APPENDIX 2A: 59 APPENDIX 2B: 60 APPENDIX 3A: STATUS OF COMPARTMEN TS IN TINTE BEPO FOR EST RESERVE DISTRICT RESERVE PRODUCTION CONVALESCENSE CONVERSION HILL SANTUARY SWAMPY Mankranso Tinte Bepo 1,2,3 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 28, 29, 30, 51, 53, 54, 80, 81, 82, 83, 87 8, 17, 27, 31, 32, 36, 40, 41, 50, 52, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60,61, 62, 64,63, 65, 66, 67,68, 72,73,74, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 84, 85, 86, 88, 90,91, 92,93 18,19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 33, 34, 35, 37, 38, 39, 42, 43, 44, 45, 46, 47,48, 49, 69, 70, 71 89 TOTAL 93 3 23 40 26 1 AREA (HA) 11,554 339.21 2,914.84 5,370.46 2,817.16 112.04 61 APPENDIX 3B: CONCESSION OWNERS//S PECIAL PERMITS COMPANY PROPERTY MARK COMPARTMENTS NO. OF COMTS REMARKS FRANCO TIMBERS LIMITED FO 57, 58, 61, 62, 63, 64, 75, 76, 77, 79 10 VALID TUC. EHWIA WOOD PRODUCTS LIMITED EWP 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 36, 40, 41, 50, 51,52,53,54, 55, 56 65, 66, 67,68, 73,74, 72,84,85,86, 90, 91, 92, 93 47 VALID TUC, COMPANY COLLAPSED. HYPERION LIGNUM LTD HLL 1 1 SPECIAL PERMIT BLESSING COMPANY LTD BCC 2 1 SPECIAL PERMIT B. B. ALANG COMPANY LTD 3 1 SPECIAL PERMIT WUKUPOMA A EXP. & WP 12 1 SPECIAL PERMIT 62 COMPANY PROPERTY MARK COMPARTMENTS

72 NO. OF COMTS REMARKS IMP. CO. LT
NO. OF COMTS REMARKS IMP. CO. LTD GIMPEX LTD GP 13 1 SPECIAL PERMIT TOTAL 57 Note: All Special permit areas were formally for Ehwia Wood Product Limited. 63 APPENDIX 3C : EXISTING HAVESTING S CHEDULE FOR TINTE BE PO FOREST RESERVE (a) Franco Timbers Limited (Revised as result of the Regional Managers Ref. No. R5 S2A/42 of 19/5/2006 and RMSC Directors Ref. No. FMSC/FMU36/HS/V1/16 of 28/8/2006). COUPE COMPARTMENTS TOTAL Coupe 1 2006 - 2010 64, 75 2 Coupe 2 2011 - 2015 76, 79 2 Coupe 3 2016 - 2020 62 1 Coupe 4 2021 - 2025 77 1 Coupe 5 2026 - 2030 57 1 Coupe 6 2031 - 2035 63 1 Coupe 7 2036 - 2040 61 1 Coupe 8 2041 - 2045 58 1 TOTAL 10 (b) Ehwia Wood Products Limited , TUC Area (RMSC Directors Ref. No. RMSC/FMU36/HS/V1/19 of 05/10/2011). COUPE COMPARTMENTS TOTAL Coupe 1 1997 - 2001 7, 9, 10, 11, 51 5 Coupe 2 2002 - 2006 8, 31, 32, 36, 40, 41, 50, 52 8 Coupe 3 2007 - 2011 67, 72, 73, 74 4 Coupe 4 2012 - 2016 90, 91, 92, 93 4 Coupe 5 2017 - 2021 17, 27, 84, 85 4 Coupe 6 2022 - 2026 15, 16, 28, 29 4 Coupe 7 2027 - 2031 1, 2, 3, 12, 13, 14 6 Coupe 8 2032 - 2036 4, 5, 53, 54 4 TOTAL 39 64 AP PENDIX 4 : NFPDP PLANTATION ESTABLISHED IN TINTE FOREST NO COMMUNITY 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Area in Ha Compt. Area in Ha Compt. Area in Ha Compt. Area in Ha Compt. Area in Ha Compt. 1

73 Biokrom 10 2,6 10 2 14 2 1
Biokrom 10 2,6 10 2 14 2 15 2 - 2 Abesewa 20 5 - - - - 8 5 - 3 Nyamebekyere 10 22 10 22 12 22 - - - 4 Fawoman 12 55 - - 12 85 12 85 5 78 5 Pokukrom 20 56,57 20 55,56 - - 30 58 - - 6 Nsuta 20 57,58 5 55 50 56 50 56 - - 7 Amangoase 10 78 10 78 5 56 26 57 - - 8 Sunkwa & Sikaasem 7 87 2 87 - - - - - - 9 Hiape 10 82 10 87 - - 12 82 20 87 10 Mmoroben 10 4,43 8 71 - - 15 71 10 71 11 Wiowso 30 45 30 42 - - 70 44,45,46 - - 12 Hwibaa 10 45 5 11 - - 30 46 - - 13 Dormaa 10 30 15 30 - - 50 31 - - 14 Betinko - - 10 85 9 78,85 26 78 12 91 15 Jacobu - - - - - - 10 30 16 Kwamekyemkrom - - - - - - 52 60 20 60 17 Bonkrom - - - - 5 15 26 78 - - 18 Wawase - - - - - - 15 45 - - 19 Asuadei - - - - - - 12 86 20 85 20 MOFA Wiaso - - - - - - 10 45 - - 21 Abruaso - - - - - - - - 12 91 22 Mmehame - - - - - - - - 10 91 23 Gambia - - - - - - - - 17 9,14 SUB - TOTAL 179 135 107 469 126 65 RESERVE (2003 – 2007) TOTAL = 1,016HA NFPDP – ECOTECH PLANTATION 2011, 2012, 2013 Com

74 munity 2011 2012 2013 Area Pla
munity 2011 2012 2013 Area Planted Compt. Area Planted Compt. Area Planted Compt. Pokukrom/Amangoase 30 27 Nsuta/Nyamebekyere 30 30 32 32 Dormaa 70 50 SUB - TOTAL 57 32 50 TOTAL = 139HA APPENDIX 5: CURRENT MANAGEMENT S TATUS OF ADMITTED RIGHTS WITHIN TINTE BEPO FOREST RESERVE Nature Of Right Right No./Name Original Area (Ha) Name Of Legal Owner (A,B,C) Estate Of Boundary Well (D,E,F,G) Availability Of Boundary Schedule (H,I) Availability Of Other Documents (J,K,L) Encroachment (M,N) Change Of Mgt Status Eg. Farm Turn Into Settlement, Food Crop Turn Into Tree Farm Action On Offences Detected Other Mgt. Challenges; Owners Has Requested For Dmarcation Challenges Boundary Etc 6 6 Nature Of Right Right No./Name Original Area (Ha) Name Of Legal Owner (A,B,C) Estate Of Boundary Well (D,E,F,G) Availability Of Boundary Schedule (H,I) Availability Of Other Documents (J,K,L) Encroachment (M,N) Change Of Mgt Status Eg. Farm Turn Into Settlement, Food Crop Turn Into Tree Farm Action On Offences Detected Other Mgt. Challenges; Owners Has Requested For Dmarcation Challenges Boundary Etc Admitted Farm (East) Kwabena Antwi 1 2 3 4 5 C C C C C E,G E,G E,G E,G E,G I I I I I K,L K,L K,L K,L K,L Owner Requested For Demarcation. Bu

75 t Schedule Not Available. Total Area
t Schedule Not Available. Total Area East 9.06 (From Mgt) Admitted Farm (West) 1 2 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 Owner Requested For Demarcation. But Schedule Not Available. 67 Nature Of Right Right No./Name Original Area (Ha) Name Of Legal Owner (A,B,C) Estate Of Boundary Well (D,E,F,G) Availability Of Boundary Schedule (H,I) Availability Of Other Documents (J,K,L) Encroachment (M,N) Change Of Mgt Status Eg. Farm Turn Into Settlement, Food Crop Turn Into Tree Farm Action On Offences Detected Other Mgt. Challenges; Owners Has Requested For Dmarcation Challenges Boundary Etc 10 11 12 H 13 H 14 15 16 Total Area West 66.82 (From Mgt) Admitted Farm (West) Adwoa Po 1 7.77 B E.G H (From Mgt) K,L M Total Area Of 88.65 68 Nature Of Right Right No./Name Original Area (Ha) Name Of Legal Owner (A,B,C) Estate Of Boundary Well (D,E,F,G) Availability Of Boundary Schedule (H,I) Availability Of Other Documents (J,K,L) Encroachment (M,N) Change Of Mgt Status Eg. Farm Turn Into Settlement, Food Crop Turn Into Tree Farm Action On Offences Detected Other Mgt. Challenges; Owners Has Requested For Dmarcation Challenges Boundary Etc Farms A =ORIGINAL OWNER; B =INHERITED OWNER;

76 C =UNKNOWN; D =MAINTAINED NOT; E =MA
C =UNKNOWN; D =MAINTAINED NOT; E =MAINTAINED; F =PILLAR INTACT; G =NO PILLARS; H = AVAILABLE; I = NOT AVAILABLE; J =RESERVE SETTLEMENT; K = MGT PLAN; L = MAPS; M = BOUNDARY EXTENDED; N = NON ADMITTED AREA ENCROACHED ESTATE COMPT. NO/AREA O = CASE PENDING; P = CASE SETTLED 69 APPENDIX 6: NATIVE A UTHORITY ORDINANCE E STABLISHING TI NTE BEPO FOREST RESERVE A S H A N T I RULES In exercise of the powers conferred upon the Governor by section 15 of the Native Authority (Ashanti ) Ordinance (Cap.79) and delegated to me by virtue of an Instrument of Delegation made under section 26 of the Interpretation Ordinance dated the third day of December, 1949, I hereby approve the following rules. 5 th July, 1951 . W. H. BEETON Chief Commissioner. The Kumasi Native Authority (Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve) Rules, 1949 1. These Rules may be cited as the Kumasi Native Authority (Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve) Rules, 1949 [ Short Title ] 2. In these Rules unless the context otherwise requires: [ Interpretation ] “Forestry Department” means the government Forestry Department. “Forest Officer” means any Officer of the Forestry Department not below the rank of an Assistant Conservator of Forests. “Forest Produce” includes the following, if found in or br

77 ought from a Forest Reserve: -- (1)
ought from a Forest Reserve: -- (1) Timber, charcoal, rubber, wood oil, resin, gum and natural varnish; (2) Trees and leaves, flowers and fruits, and all other p arts and produce not hereinbefore mentioned of trees; (3) Plants not being trees (including grass, creepers, reeds and moss) and all parts and produce of such plants; (4) Wild animals and skins, tusks, horns, bones silk, honey and wax, and all parts and produce of wild animals; and (5) Peat, surface soil and minerals other than minerals within the meaning of any Ordinance regulating the working of minerals. “Trees” includes seedlings, saplings, brushwood, palms, bamboos and canes. 3. The portion of the area of land d escribed in the schedule to these Rules which lies within the area of the Kumasi Native Authority is hereby constituted as a Forest Reserve (hereinafter referred to as the “Reserve”) to be maintained as such in accordance with these Rules. [Constitution of the Forest Reserve ] 70 4. (1) No person shall within the Reserve without the permit of the Native Authority on the written advice of a Forest Officer or a Forest Ranger certified as competent by a Forest Officer – [ Damage to Reserve Prohibited ] a) Fell, upro ot, lop, girdle, tap, injure by fire or otherwise damage any tree or plant: b) Make or cultivate any farm; c) (C) Set fire to any vegetation; d) Cause any damage by negligence in felling any tree or cutting or removing any timber; e) Construct any dam or weir

78 across a ny river, or otherwise obstruct
across a ny river, or otherwise obstruct the channel of any river; f) Hunt, shoot, fish, poison, water or set traps or snares; g) Reside, or erect any building; h) Collect, convey, remove or subject to any manufacturing process any forest produce; i) Pasture cattle or permit c attle to trespass; j) Alter, deface or obliterate any mark placed on a tree or timber, or alter, move, destroy or deface any Forest Reserve boundary mark, pillar or beacon; k) Enter into the Reserve with intent to do any of the foregoing acts. (2) Any permit given by the Native Authority in accordance with sub - rule 1 of this rule shall be subject to such condition as may be imposed. 5. Any person extending a clearing or making a new clearing within the Reserve with the permit of the Native Authority acting on the written advice of a Forest Officer or Forest Ranger certified as competent by a Forest Officer under the provisions of rule 4 of these rules shall, when burning the clearing, prevent fire from spreading into the forest, scrub or gra ss surrounding such clearing. [ Provision in respect of burning. ] 6. Notwithstanding anything to the contrary contained in these Rules a Forest Officer or any person employed by a Forest Officer on behalf of the Native Authority may fell, cut, damage, tap or destroy trees within the Reserve and make clearing therein or remove timber there from for the purpose of planting trees, improving the growth of trees, establishing nurseries for trees and generally

79 for the better management of the reser
for the better management of the reserve. [ Power s of Forest Officer to cut trees and remove timber ]. 7. (1) It shall be the duty of the Native Authority with the advice of the Forestry Department to manage the Reserve. [ Management ]. (2) When in the opinion of the Forestry Department after Consul tation with the Native Authority and the Chief Commissioner the Reserve is not being properly managed, or upon a request of the Native Authority it shall be lawful for the Forestry Department to manage the Reserve and to expend money for the purpose of suc h management; and any money so expended shall be recovered from the proceeds of the Reserve. 71 8. Every official of the Forestry Department not below the rank of a Forest Guard is hereby authorized to arrest and detain with or without a Warrant or other le gal process any person whom he finds or suspects of contravening any of the provisions of these Rules, if such person refuses to give his name or address or gives a name and address which is believed to be false, or if there is reason to believe that he wi ll abscond, and to take such person before a Court or Native Court without any unnecessary delay. [ Arrest of offenders ]. 9. Any person contravening or failing to comply with the provisions of these Rules shall be guilty of an offence and shall on convict ion be liable to a fine of twenty - five pounds or to imprisonment for three months, or to such fine and imprisonment both. [ Penalties ] 10. Nothing in these Rules shall

80 affect -- a) The right of any
affect -- a) The right of any person which would have existed but for the making of the se rules to shoot, hunts, fish, or collect snails, or deadwood or [ Saving of existing of rights ]. b) The right of any person to continue the cultivation of any area which he may lawfully have under cult ivation at the time these Rules come into force and the limits of which have been demarcated by the Forestry Department. 11. The Kumasi Division (Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve) Bye - laws, 1928, which are printed at page 383 if the Gazette for 1928 are hereby revoked.[ Revocation of Kumasi Division ( Tinte Bepo Forest Reserve - Bye - laws 1928 ] 12. The Kumasi Division (Tinte Bepo East Exten sion Forest Reserve) Rules, 1940 which are printed at page 899 of the Gazette for 1940 are hereby revoked. [ Revocation of Kuma si Division, (Tinte Bepo East Extension Forest Reserve, Rules, 1940] 13. The Kumasi Division (Tinte Bepo West Extension Forest Reserve) Rules, 1940 which are printed at page 291 of the Gazette for 1940 are hereby revoked. [ Revocati on of Kumasi Division, (Tinte Bepo West Extension Forest Reserve, Rules, 1940] 72 APPENDIX 7: SPECIES LIST TINTE

81 BEPO FOREST RESERVE Scientific name
BEPO FOREST RESERVE Scientific name Local name Family Habit Guild Star Frequency Albizia adianthifolia Pampena Mimosaceae Tree NPLD Green 7 Albizia zygia Okoro Mimosaceae Tree NPLD Green 14 Allanblackia floribunda Sonkyi Guttiferae Tree Shade bearing Green 1 Alstonia boonei Nyamedua Apocynaceae Tree Pioneer Green 14 Amphimas pterocarpoides Yaya Caesalpiniaceae Tree NPLD Green 13 Aningeria spp Asamfena Sapotaceae Tree NPLD Pink 9 Anitiaris toxicaria Kyenkyen Moraceae Tree NPLD Pink 6 Anthonatha fragrans Totoronini Caesalpiniaceae Tree NPLD/shade bearing Green 1 Anthonotha macrophylla Totoro Caesalpiniaceae Tree Shade bearing Green 2 Anthostema aubryanum Kyirikusa Euphorbiaceae Tree Swamp Blue 1 Anthrocaryon micraster Aprokuma Anacardiaceae Tree NPLD Blue 1 Antiaris toxicaria Kyenkyen Moraceae Tree NPLD Red 6 Baphia nitida Odwen Papilionaceae Tree Shade bearing Green 34 Baphia pubescens Odwenkobiri Papilionaceae Tree Pioneer Green 9 Berlinia spp Kwatafompaboa Caesalpiniaceae Tree NPLD Green 1 Blighia sapida Akye Sapindaceae Tree NPLD Green 14 73 Scientific name Local name Family Habit Guild Star Frequency Blighia welwitschii Akyekobiri Sapindaceae Tree NPLD Green 7 Bridelia atroviridis Opamkotokrodu Euphorbiaceae Tree Pioneer Green 1 Broussonet

82 ia papyrifera York Moraceae Tree
ia papyrifera York Moraceae Tree Non forest Green 590 Bussea occidentalis Kotoprepre Caesalpiniaceae Tree NPLD Green 2 Calpocalyx bravibracteatus Atrotre Mimosaceae Tree Shade bearing Green 1 Canarium schweinfurthii Bediwonua Burseraceae Tree Pioneer Red 1 Cedrella odorata Cedrella Meliaceae Tree Non forest Green 4 Ceiba pentandra Onyina Bombaceae Tree Pioneer Red 25 Celtis adolfi - friderici Esakosua Ulmaceae Tree Pioneer Pink 24 Celtis mildbraedii Esa Ulmaceae Tree Shade bearing Pink 148 Celtis zenkeri Esakokoo Ulmaceae Tree NPLD Pink 12 Chrysophyllum albidum Akasa Sapotaceae Tree Shade bearing Blue 19 Chrysophyllum perpulchrum Atabene Sapotaceae Tree NPLD Green 2 Cleidion gabonicum Mpawu Euphorbiaceae Tree/climber Shade bearing Green 5 Cleistopholis patens Ngonenkyene Annonaceae Tree Pioneer Green 2 Cola caricifolia Ananseaya Sterculiaceae Tree Pioneer Green 4 Cola gigantea Watapuo Sterculiaceae Tree NPLD Green 17 74 Scientific name Local name Family Habit Guild Star Frequency Cola nitida Bese Sterculiaceae Tree Shade bearing Pink 3 Cordia millenii Tweneboa - nini Boraginaceae Tree Pioneer Green 2 Corynanthe pachyceras Pampenama Rubiaceae Tree NPLD Green 1 Cylicodiscus gabunensis Denya Mimosaceae Tree Shade bearing Pink 5 Dacryodes klaineana

83 Adwea Burseraceae Tree Shade bea
Adwea Burseraceae Tree Shade bearing Green 1 Decryodes klaineanea Adwea Bursanvaceae Tree Shade bearing Green 1 Discoglypremna caloneura Fetefre Euphorbiaceae Tree Pioneer Green 10 Distemonanthus benthamianus Bonsamdua Caesalpiniaceae Tree NPLD Pink 3 Draceana arborea Ntonme Agavaceae Tree Pioneer Green 5 Elaeis guineensis Abe Palmae Tree Pioneer Pink 2 Entandrophragma angolense Edinam Meliaceae Tree NPLD Scarlet 24 Entandrophragma cylindricum Penkwa Meliaceae Tree NPLD Scarlet 3 Entandrophragma utile Efoobrodedwo Meliaceae Tree NPLD Scarlet 1 Erythrina mildbraedii Osorowa Papilionaceae Tree Pioneer Green 3 Ficus exasperata Nyankyerene Moraceae Tree Pioneer Green 5 75 Scientific name Local name Family Habit Guild Star Frequency Ficus sur Nwadua Moraceae Tree Pioneer Green 26 Funtumia elastica Fruntum Apocynaceae Tree Shade bearing Green 24 Greenwayodendron oliveri Duabiri Annonaceae Tree Shade bearing Green 1 Guarea cedrata Kwabohoro Meliaceae Tree Shade bearing Pink 16 Gurea cedrata Kwabohoro Meliaceae Tree Shade bearing Pink 8 Hannoa Klaineana Fotie Simaroubaceae Tree Pioneer Green 5 Heritiera utilis Nyankom Sterculiaceae Tree NPLD Red 13 Hexalobus crispflorus Duabaha Annonaceae Tree Shade bearing Green 1 Holoptelea grandis Nakwa Ulmaceae

84 Tree Pioneer Pink 1 Hymenosteg
Tree Pioneer Pink 1 Hymenostegia afzelii Takorowa Caesalpiniaceae Tree Shade bearing Green 30 Irvingia gabonensis Abesebuo Irvingiaceae Tree NPLD Green 1 Khaya ivorensis Dubin Meliaceae Tree NPLD Scarlet 11 Mahogany Meliaceae Tree NPLD Scarlet 1 Kigelia africana Nufuten Bignonieceae Tree NPLD Green 8 Klainedoxa gabonensis Kroma Irvingiaceae Tree NPLD Green 1 Lannea welwitschii Kumanini Anacardiaceae Tree Pioneer Green 8 Maesobotrya barterii Apotrewa 1 Maesohotrya barteri Apotrewa Euphorbiaceae Tree Shade - bearing Green 1 76 Scientific name Local name Family Habit Guild Star Frequency Mansonia altissima Oprono Sterculiaceae Tree NPLD Pink 3 Mareya micrantha Dubrafo Euphorbiaceae Tree Shade bearing Green 2 Microdesmis puberula Ofema Pandaceae Tree Shade bearing Green 7 Milicia excelsa Odum Moraceae Tree Pioneer Scarlet 3 Monodora myristica Wedeaba Annonaceae Tree Shade bearing Green 3 Morus mesozygia Wonton Moraceae Tree Pioneer Pink 2 Musanga cecropioides Odwuma Moraceae Tree Pioneer Green 12 Myrianthus libericus Nyankumanini Moraceae Tree Shade bearing Green 1 Nauclea diderrichii Kusia Rubiaceae Tree Pioneer Scarlet 1 Nesogordonia papaverifera Danta Sterculiaceae Tree Shade bearing Pink 37 Newbouldia laevis Sesemasa Bignoniaceae

85 Tree Pioneer Green 11 Octoknem
Tree Pioneer Green 11 Octoknema borealis Wisuboni Olacaceae Tree Shade bearing Green 8 Parkia bicolor Asoma Mimosaceae Tree NPLD Green 1 Pentaclethra macrophylla Ataa Mimosaceae Tree NPLD Green 1 Penthaclethra macrophylla Ataa Mimosaceae Tree NPLD Green 1 Piptadeniastrum africanum Dahoma Mimosaceae Tree NPLD Pink 6 Pycnanthus angolensis Otie Myristicaceae Tree NPLD Pink 17 Rauvolfia vomitoria Kakapenpen Apocynaceae Tree Pioneer Green 1 77 Scientific name Local name Family Habit Guild Star Frequency Rhodognaphalon buonopozence Akata Bombaceae Tree Pioneer Green 2 Ricinodendron heudelotii Wama Euphorbiaceae Tree Pioneer Pink 50 Salacia africana Nnoto Celastraceae Climber Green 1 Scottellia klaineana Tiabutuo Flacourtiaceae Tree Shade bearing Pink 1 Sterculia oblonga Ohaa Sterculiaceae Tree NPLD Green 13 Sterculia rhinopetala Wawabima Sterculiaceae Tree NPLD Pink 32 Sterculia tragacantha Sofo Sterculiaceae Tree Pioneer Green 11 Strombosia glaucascens Afena Olalaceae Tree Shade bearing Green 7 Tabernaemontana africana Obonawa Apocynaceae Tree Shade bearing Green 1 Terminalia ivorensis Emire Combretaceae Tree Pioneer Red 2 Terminalia superba Ofram Combretaceae Tree Shade bearing Red 13 Terochidium didymostemon Anenedua Euphorbiaceae Tree Pionee

86 r Green 1 Tetrapleura tetraptera
r Green 1 Tetrapleura tetraptera Prekese Mimosaceae Tree Pioneer Green 1 Treculia africana Brebretim Moraceae Tree NPLD Green 2 Trema orientalis Sesea Ulmaceae Tree Pioneer Green 1 Trichilia monadelpha Tanuro Meliaceae Tree NPLD Green 46 Trichilia prieureana Kakadikuro Meliaceae Tree NPLD Green 71 78 Scientific name Local name Family Habit Guild Star Frequency Trilepisium madagascariense Okure Moraceae Tree NPLD Green 25 Triplochiton scleroxylon Wawa Sterculiaceae Tree Pioneer Scarlet 32 Xylia evansii Samantawa Mimosaceae Tree NPLD Blue 1 Unknown Mpawuofufuo 21 Unknown Nsononakoma 1 Unknown Sante 12 Unknown Twabere 1 Acacia pentagona Nwere Mimosaceae Liane NPLD Green 2 Adiantum incisum Ayanini weed 1 Aframomum standfieldii Sensam Zingiberaceae Climber/Herb Pioneer Blue 6 Aframomum sulcatum Nsome Zingiberaceae Herb Pioneer Blue 3 Chromolaena odorata Acheampong Asteraceae Shrub Green 1 Clerodendron capitatum Taasendua Verbenaceae Shrub Pioneer Green 2 Combretum tarquense Hweremo Combretaceae Climber Pioneer Gold 1 Dioclea reflexa Toasohoma Papilionaceae Liane Pioneer Green 12 Draceana arborea Ntonme Agavaceae Tree Pioneer Green 2 Eremospatha macrocarpa Mfea Palmae Liane Swamp Pink 2

87 79 Scientific name Local name Fami
79 Scientific name Local name Family Habit Guild Star Frequency Gongronema latifolium Ansurogya 3 Griffonia simplicifolia Kagya Caesalpiniaceae Climber NPLD Green 4 Habenaria macrandra Kyeretwe Orchidaceae Herb NPLD Green 4 Hypselodelphys poggeana Babadua Marantaceae Tree Pioneer Green 7 Kigelia africana Nwere Bignoniaceae Tree NPLD Green 2 Marantochloa leucantha Sibire Bignoniaceae Climber Pioneer Green 7 Millettia chrysophylla Sahoma Papilionaceae Liane NPLD Green 8 Parquetina nigrescens Abakamo 2 Psychotria aff. Calceata Kwasiata Rubiaceae Shrub Shade bearing Black 1 Salacia africana Nnoto Celastraceae Climber Green 1 Smalae claussiana Kokora Similacaceae Climber Pioneer Green 5 Strophanthus barteri Mmatwanua Apocynaceae Liane NPLD Green 1 Thaumatococcus daniellii Awonomo Marantaceae Herb Pioneer Red 5 Triclisia patens Kentenkreke Menispermaceae Climber Green 1 Grand Total 1,688 80 APPENDIX 8: STEM NUMBERS PER KM 2 GROUPED ACCORDING TO CM DIAMETER CLASSES. TINTE BEPO FOREST RESERVE. SURVEY CONDUCTED IN MAY 2015 GENUS SPECIES Local Name FLIMITS Class 10 - 29.9 30 - 49.9 50 - 69.9 70.89.9 90 - 109.9 110 - 129.9 �=130 Total �=FLIM Albizia adianthifolia Pampena 90 1 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 0 Albizia zygia Okoro 9

88 0 1 200 0 0 0 0 0 0 20
0 1 200 0 0 0 0 0 0 200 0 Alstonia boonei Sinuro 110 1 150 0 0 0 0 0 0 150 0 Amphimas pterocarpoides Yaya 90 1 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 0 Aningeria spp. Asamfena 90 1 117 0 0 0 0 0 0 117 0 Antiaris toxicaria Kyenkyen 110 1 67 0 0 0 0 0 0 67 0 Antrocaryon micraster Aprokuma 90 1 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 Blighia sapida Akye 90 1 183 0 0 0 0 0 0 183 0 Canarium schweinfurthii Bediwonua 110 1 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 Ceiba pentandra Onyina 110 1 200 0 0 0 0 0 0 200 0 Celtis aldolfi - frider Esakosua 70 1 250 0 0 0 0 0 0 250 0 Celtis mildbraedii Esa 70 1 1534 0 0 0 0 0 0 1534 0 Celtis zenkeri Esakoko 70 1 133 0 0 0 0 0 0 133 0 Chrysophyllum albidum Akasaa 70 1 183 0 0 0 0 0 0 183 0 Cola gigantea Watapuo 70 1 67 0 0 0 0 0 0 67 0 Cordia millenii Tweneboa 70 1 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 Cylicodiscus gabunensis Denyao 70 1 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 0 Distemonanthus benthamianus Bonsamdua 90 1 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 0 Entandrophragma angolense Edinam 110 1 317 0 0 0 0 0 0 317 0 Entandrophragma candollei Penkwa - Akoa 110 1 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 0 Entandrophragma

89 cylindricum Penkwa 110 1 33
cylindricum Penkwa 110 1 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 0 81 GENUS SPECIES Local Name FLIMITS Class 10 - 29.9 30 - 49.9 50 - 69.9 70.89.9 90 - 109.9 110 - 129.9 �=130 Total �=FLIM Entandrophragma utile Efoobrodedwo 110 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Guarea cedrata Kwabohoro 90 1 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 Guibortia ehie Anokye - Hyedua 90 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Heretiera utilis Nyankom 70 1 200 0 0 0 0 0 0 200 0 Khaya ivorensis Dubini 110 1 117 0 0 0 0 0 0 117 0 Lannea welwitschii Kumnini 70 1 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 0 Mansonia altissima Oprono 90 1 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 0 Milicia excelsa Odum 110 1 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 0 Morus mesozygia Wonton 90 1 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 Nauclea diderrichii Kusia 110 1 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 Nesogordonia papaverifera Danta 70 1 283 0 0 0 0 0 0 283 0 Piptadeniastrum africanum Dahoma 70 1 67 0 0 0 0 0 0 67 0 Pterygota macrocarpa Kyereye 70 1 83 0 0 0 0 0 0 83 0 Pycnanthus angolensis Otie 70 1 183 0 0 0 0 0 0 183 0 Sterculia Oblongata Ohaa 70 1 83 0 0 0 0 0 0 83 0 Sterculia rhinopetala Wawabima 70 1 483 0 0 0 0 0 0 483 0 Strombosia

90 glaucescens Afena 20 1 117 0
glaucescens Afena 20 1 117 0 0 0 0 0 0 117 0 Terminalia ivorensis Emire 90 1 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 0 Terminalia superba Ofram 90 1 133 0 0 0 0 0 0 133 0 Triplochiton scleroxylon Wawa 90 1 300 0 0 0 0 0 0 300 0 SUB TOTAL 1 6,068 0 0 0 0 0 0 6,068 0 Anthonotha fragrans Totoronini 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Anthonotha macrophylla Totoro 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 82 GENUS SPECIES Local Name FLIMITS Class 10 - 29.9 30 - 49.9 50 - 69.9 70.89.9 90 - 109.9 110 - 129.9 �=130 Total �=FLIM Anthostema aubryanum Kyirikusa 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Baphia nitida Odwen 2 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 Baphia pubescens Odwenkobiri 2 133 0 0 0 0 0 0 133 Blighia welwitschii Akyekobiri 2 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 Bridelia spp. Opamkotokrodu 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Broussonetia papyrifera York 2 5318 0 0 0 0 0 0 5318 Calpocalyx brevibracteatu Atrotre 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Cleidion gabonicum Mpawu 2 83 0 0 0 0 0 0 83 Cleistopholis patens Ngonenkyene 2 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 Coelocaryon oxycarpum Abruma 2 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 Cola caricifolia Osonkurobia 2 67 0 0 0 0

91 0 0 67 Cola nitida Bese
0 0 67 Cola nitida Bese 2 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 Corynanthe pachyceras Pampenama 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Dacryodes klaineana Adwea 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Discoglypremna caloneura Fetefre 2 133 0 0 0 0 0 0 133 Dracaena arborea Ntonme 2 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 Elaeis guineensis Abe 2 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 Erythrina spp. Osorowa 2 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 Ficus exasperata Nyankyerene 2 50 0 0 0 0 0 0 50 Ficus sur Nwadua 2 367 0 0 0 0 0 0 367 Funtumia elastica Fruntum 2 367 0 0 0 0 0 0 367 Greenwayodendro oliveri Duabiri 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Hannoa klaineana Fotie 90 2 83 0 0 0 0 0 0 83 0 83 GENUS SPECIES Local Name FLIMITS Class 10 - 29.9 30 - 49.9 50 - 69.9 70.89.9 90 - 109.9 110 - 129.9 �=130 Total �=FLIM Hexalobus crispiflorus Duabaha 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Hymenostegia afzelii Takorowa 2 250 0 0 0 0 0 0 250 Kigelia africana Nufuten 2 83 0 0 0 0 0 0 83 Lannea welwitschii Kumanini 2 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 Lonchocarpus sericeus Sante 2 117 0 0 0 0 0 0 117 Maesobotrya barteri Apotrewa 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Mareya micr

92 antha Dubrafo 2 0 0 0 0
antha Dubrafo 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Microdesmis puberula Ofema 2 67 0 0 0 0 0 0 67 Monodora myristica Wedeaba 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Musanga cecropioides Odwuma 2 117 0 0 0 0 0 0 117 Myrianthus libericus Nyankumanini 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Newbouldia laevis Sesemasa 2 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 Octoknema borealis Wisuboni 2 67 0 0 0 0 0 0 67 Pseudospondias microcarpa Katawani 2 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 Rauvolfia vomitoria Kakapenpen 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Ricinodendron heudelotii Wama 110 2 517 0 0 0 0 0 0 517 0 Scottellia klaineana Tiabutuo 70 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 0 Sterculia tragacantha Sofo 2 100 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 Tabernaemontana africana Obonawa 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Tetrapleura tetraptera Prekese 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Tetrorchidium didymostemon Anenedua 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Treculia africana Brebretim 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Trema orientalis Sesea 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 84 GENUS SPECIES Local Name FLIMITS Class 10 - 29.9 30 - 49.9 50 - 69.9 70.89.9 90 - 109.9 110 - 129.9 �=130 Total �=FLIM Trichilia monadelpha Tandro 2 550 0 0 0 0 0

93 0 550 Trichilia prieuriana Kak
0 550 Trichilia prieuriana Kakadikuro 2 917 0 0 0 0 0 0 917 Trilepisium madagascarien. Okure 2 183 0 0 0 0 0 0 183 Vernonia amygdalina Awonwene 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Xylia evansii Abobabema 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 Xylia evansii Samantawa 2 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 17 SUM TOTAL 2 10,535 0 0 0 0 0 0 10,535 0 GRAND TOTAL 16,603 0 0 0 0 0 0 16,603 0 85 APPENDIX 9 : BASAL AREA IN M 2 PER KM 2 GROUPED ACCORDING TO CM DIAMETER CLASSES. TINTE BEPO FOREST RESERVE. SURVEY CONDUCTED IN MAY 2015 GENUS SPECIES Local Name FLIMITS Class 10 - 29.9 30 - 49.9 50 - 69.9 70.89.9 90 - 109.9 110 - 129.9 �=130 Total �=FLIM Albizia adianthifolia Pampena 90 1 2.45 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.45 0.00 Albizia zygia Okoro 90 1 6.17 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 6.17 0.00 Alstonia boonei Sinuro 110 1 4.06 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.06 0.00 Amphimas pterocarpoides Yaya 90 1 1.72 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.72 0.00 Aningeria spp. Asamfena 90 1 3.50 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.50 0.00 Antiaris toxicaria Kyenkyen 110 1 2.62 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.62 0.00 Antrocaryon micraster Aprokuma 90 1 0.65 0.00

94 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.
0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.65 0.00 Blighia sapida Akye 90 1 5.14 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 5.14 0.00 Canarium schweinfurthii Bediwonua 110 1 0.26 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.26 0.00 Ceiba pentandra Onyina 110 1 5.91 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 5.91 0.00 Celtis aldolfi - frider Esakosua 70 1 7.46 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 7.46 0.00 Celtis mildbraedii Esa 70 1 50.59 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 50.59 0.00 Celtis zenkeri Esakoko 70 1 4.46 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.46 0.00 Chrysophyllum albidum Akasaa 70 1 4.20 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.20 0.00 Cola gigantea Watapuo 70 1 2.08 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.08 0.00 Cordia millenii Tweneboa 70 1 1.05 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.05 0.00 Cylicodiscus gabunensis Denyao 70 1 0.85 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.85 0.00 Distemonanthus benthamianus Bonsamdua 90 1 0.59 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.59 0.00 Entandrophragma angolense Edinam 110 1 11.51 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 11.51 0.00 Entandrophragma candollei Penkwa - Akoa 110 1 1.67 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.67 0.00 Entandrophragma cylindricum Penkwa 110 1 0.82 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.82

95 0.00 Entandrophragma utile Efoo
0.00 Entandrophragma utile Efoobrodedwo 110 1 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Guarea cedrata Kwabohoro 90 1 0.34 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.34 0.00 Guibortia ehie Anokye - Hyedua 90 1 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 86 GENUS SPECIES Local Name FLIMITS Class 10 - 29.9 30 - 49.9 50 - 69.9 70.89.9 90 - 109.9 110 - 129.9 �=130 Total �=FLIM Heretiera utilis Nyankom 70 1 6.65 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 6.65 0.00 Khaya ivorensis Dubini 110 1 3.21 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.21 0.00 Lannea welwitschii Kumnini 70 1 4.25 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.25 0.00 Mansonia altissima Oprono 90 1 0.95 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.95 0.00 Milicia excelsa Odum 110 1 0.83 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.83 0.00 Morus mesozygia Wonton 90 1 0.23 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.23 0.00 Nauclea diderrichii Kusia 110 1 0.35 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.35 0.00 Nesogordonia papaverifera Danta 70 1 8.54 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 8.54 0.00 Piptadeniastrum africanum Dahoma 70 1 2.93 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.93 0.00 Pterygota macrocarpa+ Kyereye 70 1 2.84 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.84 0.00

96 Pycnanthus angolensis Otie 70 1
Pycnanthus angolensis Otie 70 1 5.34 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 5.34 0.00 Sterculia Oblongata Ohaa 70 1 1.98 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.98 0.00 Sterculia rhinopetala Wawabima 70 1 10.22 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.22 0.00 Strombosia glaucescens Afena 20 1 1.88 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.88 0.00 Terminalia ivorensis Emire 90 1 1.08 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.08 0.00 Terminalia superba Ofram 90 1 4.10 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.10 0.00 Triplochiton scleroxylon Wawa 90 1 10.02 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.02 0.00 SUB TOTAL 1 183.48 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 183.48 0.00 Anthonotha fragrans Totoronini 2 0.69 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.69 Anthonotha macrophylla Totoro 2 0.45 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.45 Anthostema aubryanum Kyirikusa 2 0.43 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.43 Baphia nitida Odwen 2 0.73 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.73 Baphia pubescens Odwenkobiri 2 2.29 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.29 Blighia welwitschii Akyekobiri 2 3.46 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.46 Bridelia spp. Opamkotokrod u 2 0.46 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.46 Broussonetia papyrife

97 ra York 2 141.77 0.00 0.00
ra York 2 141.77 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 141.77 87 GENUS SPECIES Local Name FLIMITS Class 10 - 29.9 30 - 49.9 50 - 69.9 70.89.9 90 - 109.9 110 - 129.9 �=130 Total �=FLIM Calpocalyx brevibracteatu Atrotre 2 1.05 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.05 Cleidion gabonicum Mpawu 2 1.17 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.17 Cleistopholis patens Ngonenkyene 2 1.20 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.20 Coelocaryon oxycarpum Abruma 2 1.03 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.03 Cola caricifolia Osonkurobia 2 1.30 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.30 Cola nitida Bese 2 1.08 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.08 Corynanthe pachyceras Pampenama 2 0.66 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.66 Dacryodes klaineana Adwea 2 0.35 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.35 Discoglypremna caloneura Fetefre 2 2.97 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.97 Dracaena arborea Ntonme 2 1.90 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.90 Elaeis guineensis Abe 2 1.28 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.28 Erythrina spp. Osorowa 2 0.98 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.98 Ficus exasperata Nyankyerene 2 1.22 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.22 Ficus sur Nwadua 2 10.59 0

98 .00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.59 Funtumia elastica Fruntum 2 10.09 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 10.09 Greenwayodendro oliveri Duabiri 2 0.27 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.27 Hannoa klaineana Fotie 90 2 1.99 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.99 0.00 Hexalobus crispiflorus Duabaha 2 0.31 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.31 Hymenostegia afzelii Takorowa 2 4.77 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.77 Kigelia africana Nufuten 2 1.22 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.22 Lannea welwitschii Kumanini 2 4.25 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 4.25 Lonchocarpus sericeus Sante 2 3.04 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.04 Maesobotrya barteri Apotrewa 2 0.38 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.38 Mareya micrantha Dubrafo 2 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Microdesmis puberula Ofema 2 0.93 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.93 Monodora myristica Wedeaba 2 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Musanga cecropioides Odwuma 2 3.43 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.43 88 GENUS SPECIES Local Name FLIMITS Class 10 - 29.9 30 - 49.9 50 - 69.9 70.89.9 90 - 109.9 110 - 129.9 �=130 Total �=FLIM Myrianthus libericus Nyankumanini 2 0.43 0

99 .00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00
.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.43 Newbouldia laevis Sesemasa 2 2.18 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 2.18 Octoknema borealis Wisuboni 2 1.76 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1.76 Pseudospondias microcarpa Katawani 2 0.88 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.88 Rauvolfia vomitoria Kakapenpen 2 0.35 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.35 Ricinodendron heudelotii Wama 110 2 18.32 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 18.32 0.00 Scottellia klaineana Tiabutuo 70 2 0.27 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.27 0.00 Sterculia tragacantha Sofo 2 3.66 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 3.66 Tabernaemontana africana Obonawa 2 0.25 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.25 Tetrapleura tetraptera Prekese 2 0.53 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.53 Tetrorchidium didymostemon Anenedua 2 0.44 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.44 Treculia africana Brebretim 2 0.54 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.54 Trema orientalis Sesea 2 0.42 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.42 Trichilia monadelpha Tandro 2 17.37 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 17.37 Trichilia prieuriana Kakadikuro 2 23.90 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 23.90 Trilepisium madagascarien. Okure 2 7.70 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00

100 0.00 0.00 7.70 Vernonia amygda
0.00 0.00 7.70 Vernonia amygdalina Awonwene 2 0.43 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.43 Xylia evansii Abobabema 2 0.20 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.20 Xylia evansii Samantawa 2 0.20 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.20 SUB TOTAL 2 287.59 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 287.59 0.00 GRAND TOTAL 471.07 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 471.07 0.00 89 APPENDIX 10 : V OLUME IN M 3 PER KM 2 GROUPED ACCORDING TO CM DIAMETER CLASSES. TINTE BEPO FOREST RESERVE. SURV EY CONDUCTED IN MAY 2015 GENUS SPECIES Local Name FLIMITS Class 10 - 29.9 30 - 49.9 50 - 69.9 70.89.9 90 - 109.9 110 - 129.9 �=130 Total �=FLIM Albizia adianthifolia Pampena 90 1 26 0 0 0 0 0 0 26 0 Albizia zygia Okoro 90 1 68 0 0 0 0 0 0 68 0 Alstonia boonei Sinuro 110 1 44 0 0 0 0 0 0 44 0 Amphimas pterocarpoides Yaya 90 1 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 0 Aningeria spp. Asamfena 90 1 38 0 0 0 0 0 0 38 0 Antiaris toxicaria Kyenkyen 110 1 29 0 0 0 0 0 0 29 0 Antrocaryon micraster Aprokuma 90 1 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 0 Blighia sapida Akye 90 1 56 0 0 0 0 0 0 56 0 Canarium schweinfurthii Bediwonua 110 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 Ceiba pentandra

101 Onyina 110 1 65 0 0 0 0
Onyina 110 1 65 0 0 0 0 0 0 65 0 Celtis aldolfi - frider Esakosua 70 1 81 0 0 0 0 0 0 81 0 Celtis mildbraedii Esa 70 1 553 0 0 0 0 0 0 553 0 Celtis zenkeri Esakoko 70 1 49 0 0 0 0 0 0 49 0 Chrysophyllum albidum Akasaa 70 1 45 0 0 0 0 0 0 45 0 Cola gigantea Watapuo 70 1 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 23 0 Cordia millenii Tweneboa 70 1 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 Cylicodiscus gabunensis Denyao 70 1 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 Distemonanthus benthamianus Bonsamdua 90 1 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 Entandrophragma angolense Edinam 110 1 127 0 0 0 0 0 0 127 0 Entandrophragma candollei Penkwa - Akoa 110 1 18 0 0 0 0 0 0 18 0 Entandrophragma cylindricum Penkwa 110 1 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 Entandrophragma utile Efoobrodedwo 110 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Guarea cedrata Kwabohoro 90 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 Guibortia ehie Anokye - Hyedua 90 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Heretiera utilis Nyankom 70 1 73 0 0 0 0 0 0 73 0 Khaya ivorensis Dubini 110 1 35 0 0 0 0 0 0 35 0 90 GENUS SPECIES Local Name FLIMITS Class 10 - 29.9 30 - 49.9 50 - 69.9 70.89.9 90 - 109.9 110 - 129.9 �=130 Total �=FLIM Lannea we

102 lwitschii Kumnini 70 1 48 0
lwitschii Kumnini 70 1 48 0 0 0 0 0 0 48 0 Mansonia altissima Oprono 90 1 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 0 Milicia excelsa Odum 110 1 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 0 Morus mesozygia Wonton 90 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 Nauclea diderrichii Kusia 110 1 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 0 Nesogordonia papaverifera Danta 70 1 93 0 0 0 0 0 0 93 0 Piptadeniastrum africanum Dahoma 70 1 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 0 Pterygota macrocarpa+ Kyereye 70 1 31 0 0 0 0 0 0 31 0 Pycnanthus angolensis Otie 70 1 58 0 0 0 0 0 0 58 0 Sterculia Oblongata Ohaa 70 1 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 21 0 Sterculia rhinopetala Wawabima 70 1 107 0 0 0 0 0 0 107 0 Strombosia glaucescens Afena 20 1 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 0 Terminalia ivorensis Emire 90 1 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 0 Terminalia superba Ofram 90 1 44 0 0 0 0 0 0 44 0 Triplochiton scleroxylon Wawa 90 1 110 0 0 0 0 0 0 110 0 SUB TOTAL 1 1,998 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,998 0 Anthonotha fragrans Totoronini 2 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 8 Anthonotha macrophylla Totoro 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Anthostema aubryanum Kyirikusa 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Baphia nitida Odwen 2 8 0 0 0 0 0 0

103 8 Baphia pubescens Odwenkobiri
8 Baphia pubescens Odwenkobiri 2 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 23 Blighia welwitschii Akyekobiri 2 38 0 0 0 0 0 0 38 Bridelia spp. Opamkotokrodu 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Broussonetia papyrifera York 2 1,526 0 0 0 0 0 0 1,526 Calpocalyx brevibracteatu Atrotre 2 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 Cleidion gabonicum Mpawu 2 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 Cleistopholis patens Ngonenkyene 2 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 Coelocaryon oxycarpum Abruma 2 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 11 Cola caricifolia Osonkurobia 2 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 91 GENUS SPECIES Local Name FLIMITS Class 10 - 29.9 30 - 49.9 50 - 69.9 70.89.9 90 - 109.9 110 - 129.9 �=130 Total �=FLIM Cola nitida Bese 2 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 Corynanthe pachyceras Pampenama 2 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 7 Dacryodes klaineana Adwea 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Discoglypremna caloneura Fetefre 2 31 0 0 0 0 0 0 31 Dracaena arborea Ntonme 2 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 21 Elaeis guineensis Abe 2 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 14 Erythrina spp. Osorowa 2 10 0 0 0 0 0 0 10 Ficus exasperata Nyankyerene 2 13 0 0 0 0 0 0 13 Ficus sur Nwadua 2 114 0 0 0 0 0 0 114 Funtumia elastica

104 Fruntum 2 109 0 0 0 0
Fruntum 2 109 0 0 0 0 0 0 109 Greenwayodendro oliveri Duabiri 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Hannoa klaineana Fotie 90 2 21 0 0 0 0 0 0 21 0 Hexalobus crispiflorus Duabaha 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 Hymenostegia afzelii Takorowa 2 49 0 0 0 0 0 0 49 Kigelia africana Nufuten 2 12 0 0 0 0 0 0 12 Lannea welwitschii Kumanini 2 48 0 0 0 0 0 0 48 Lonchocarpus sericeus Sante 2 33 0 0 0 0 0 0 33 Maesobotrya barteri Apotrewa 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Mareya micrantha Dubrafo 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Microdesmis puberula Ofema 2 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 Monodora myristica Wedeaba 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Musanga cecropioides Odwuma 2 37 0 0 0 0 0 0 37 Myrianthus libericus Nyankumanini 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Newbouldia laevis Sesemasa 2 23 0 0 0 0 0 0 23 Octoknema borealis Wisuboni 2 19 0 0 0 0 0 0 19 Pseudospondias microcarpa Katawani 2 9 0 0 0 0 0 0 9 Rauvolfia vomitoria Kakapenpen 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Ricinodendron heudelotii Wama 110 2 203 0 0 0 0 0 0 203 0 Scottellia klaineana Tiabutuo 70 2 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 92 GENUS SPECIES Local Name

105 FLIMITS Class 10 - 29.9 30 - 49.9
FLIMITS Class 10 - 29.9 30 - 49.9 50 - 69.9 70.89.9 90 - 109.9 110 - 129.9 �=130 Total �=FLIM Sterculia tragacantha Sofo 2 41 0 0 0 0 0 0 41 Tabernaemontana africana Obonawa 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Tetrapleura tetraptera Prekese 2 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 Tetrorchidium didymostemon Anenedua 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Treculia africana Brebretim 2 6 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 Trema orientalis Sesea 2 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 4 Trichilia monadelpha Tandro 2 190 0 0 0 0 0 0 190 Trichilia prieuriana Kakadikuro 2 258 0 0 0 0 0 0 258 Trilepisium madagascarien Okure 2 86 0 0 0 0 0 0 86 Vernonia amygdalina Awonwene 2 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 5 Xylia evansii Abobabema 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 Xylia evansii Samantawa 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 SUB TOTAL 2 3106 0 0 0 0 0 0 3106 0 GRAND TOTAL 5104 0 0 0 0 0 0 5104 0 93 APPENDIX 11: TONS OF CARBON DIOXIDE EQUIV ALENT PER HA OF ALL SPECIES� = 10 CM DBH. GROUPED ACCORDING TO SPECIES - TINTE FOREST RESERVE. SURVEY CONDUCTED IN MAY 2015 Genus Species Local name Carbon (tons/Ha) tCO2e/Ha Albizia zygia Okoro 0.12 0.44 Albizia adianthifolia Pampena 0.08 0.29 Alstonia boonei Onyame - dua

106 0.12 0.44 Amphimas pterocarpoid
0.12 0.44 Amphimas pterocarpoides Yaya 0.07 0.26 Aningeria spp. Asamfena 0.09 0.33 Anthonotha macrophylla Totoro 0.02 0.06 Anthonotha fragrans Totoronini 0.03 0.11 Anthostema aubryanum Kyirikusa 0.02 0.06 Antiaris toxicaria Kyenkyen 0.07 0.25 Antrocaryon micraster Aprokuma 0.03 0.10 Baphia nitida Odwen 0.03 0.09 Baphia pubescens Odwenkobiri 0.07 0.27 Blighia sapida Akye 0.20 0.73 Blighia welwitschii Akyekobiri 0.14 0.52 Bridelia spp. Opamkotokrodu 0.01 0.04 Broussonetia papyrifera York 3.77 13.84 Calpocalyx brevibracteatu Atrotre 0.05 0.18 Canarium schweinfurthii Bediwonua 0.01 0.02 Ceiba pentandra Onyina 0.19 0.69 Celtis mildbraedii Esa 1.80 6.59 Celtis aldolfi - frider Esakokoo 0.02 0.06 Celtis zenkeri Esakokoo 0.17 0.61 Celtis aldolfi - frider Esakosua 0.26 0.96 Chrysophyllum albidum Akasa 0.15 0.54 Cleidion gabonicum Mpawu 0.04 0.13 Cleistopholis patens Ngonenkyene 0.05 0.17 Coelocaryon oxycarpum Cedrella 0.04 0.14 Cola caricifolia Ananseaya 0.04 0.16 94 Genus Species Local name Carbon (tons/Ha) tCO2e/Ha Cola nitida Bese 0.04 0.15 Cola gigantea Watapuo 0.08 0.29 Cordia millenii Tweneboa - nini 0.05 0.18 Corynanthe pachyceras Pampenama 0.03 0.10 Cylicodiscus gabunensis Denya 0.03 0.11 Dacryodes klaineana

107 Adwea 0.01 0.04 Discoglypremna c
Adwea 0.01 0.04 Discoglypremna caloneura Fetefre 0.10 0.35 Distemonanthus benthamianus Bonsamdua 0.02 0.07 Dracaena arborea Ntonme 0.06 0.23 Elaeis guineensis Abe 0.06 0.20 Entandrophragma angolense Edinam 0.33 1.22 Entandrophragma cylindricum Penkwa 0.03 0.10 Entandrophragma candollei Penkwa Akoa 0.06 0.23 Erythrina spp. Osorowa 0.02 0.09 Ficus sur Nwadua 0.50 1.83 Ficus exasperata Nyankyerene 0.03 0.11 Funtumia elastica Fruntum 0.28 1.03 Greenwayodendr o oliveri Duabiri 0.01 0.04 Guarea cedrata Kwabohoro 0.01 0.03 Hannoa klaineana Fotie 0.09 0.34 Heretiera utilis Nyankom 0.19 0.68 Hexalobus crispiflorus Duabaha 0.01 0.04 Hymenostegia afzelii Takrowa 0.19 0.69 Khaya ivorensis Dubin 0.09 0.34 Kigelia africana Nufutene 0.04 0.14 Lannea welwitschii Kumanini 0.40 1.46 Lonchocarpus sericeus SAnte 0.13 0.48 Maesobotrya barteri Apotrewa 0.01 0.05 Mansonia altissima Oprono 0.03 0.11 Microdesmis puberula Ofema 0.03 0.10 Milicia excelsa Odum 0.02 0.07 Morus mesozygia Wonton 0.01 0.02 Musanga cecropioides Odwuma 0.18 0.67 95 Genus Species Local name Carbon (tons/Ha) tCO2e/Ha Myrianthus libericus Nyankumanini 0.02 0.06 Nauclea diderrichii Kusia 0.01 0.04 Nesogordonia papaverifera Danta 0.38 1.38 Newbouldia laevis Sesema

108 sa 0.04 0.15 Octoknema borealis
sa 0.04 0.15 Octoknema borealis Wisuboni 0.08 0.30 Piptadeniastrum africanum Dahoma 0.12 0.44 Pseudospondias microcarpa Akatawanini 0.03 0.12 Pterygota macrocarpa+ Kyereye (Koto) 0.07 0.24 Pycnanthus angolensis Otie 0.18 0.65 Rauvolfia vomitoria Kakapenpen 0.01 0.04 Ricinodendron heudelotii Wama 0.63 2.33 Scottellia klaineana Tiabutuo 0.01 0.03 Sterculia Oblongata Ohaa 0.08 0.29 Sterculia tragacantha Sofo 0.10 0.37 Sterculia rhinopetala Wawabima 0.23 0.85 Strombosia glaucescens Afena 0.05 0.19 Tabernaemontana africana Obonawa 0.01 0.03 Terminalia ivorensis Emire 0.03 0.12 Terminalia superba Ofram 0.12 0.42 Tetrapleura tetraptera Prekese 0.02 0.07 Tetrorchidium didymostemon Anenedua 0.01 0.05 Treculia africana Brebretim 0.01 0.05 Trema orientalis Sesea 0.01 0.04 Trichilia prieuriana Kakadikro 0.48 1.76 Trichilia monadelpha Tanuro 0.45 1.65 Trilepisium madagascarien. Okure 0.20 0.73 Triplochiton scleroxylon Wawa 0.21 0.78 Vernonia amygdalina Awonyono 0.01 0.04 Xylia evansii Samantawa 0.01 0.03 Total 14.43 52.96 Juvinile trees 5.74 21.07 Total 20.17 74.02 96 APPENDIX 12: BIRDS (FAUNA SURVEY, MAY 2015.) FAMILY COMMON NAME CLOSED REL ATIVE ABUNDANCE DEGRADED RELATIVE ABUNDANCE OPEN RELATIVE ABUNDANCE ACCIPITRIDA

109 E African Goshawk 1 0.6 0 0.0
E African Goshawk 1 0.6 0 0.0 0 0.0 Lizard Buzzard 3 1.7 0 0.0 0 0.0 Harrier Hawk 0 0.0 1 1.3 1 0.5 ALCEDINIDAE Blue - breasted Kingfisher 1 0.6 0 0.0 1 0.5 Woodland Kingfisher 1 0.6 0 0.0 3 1.6 African Pigmy Kingfisher 0 0.0 1 1.3 1 0.5 APODIDAE Common Swift 0 0.0 2 2.5 0 0.0 BUCEROTIDAE African Pied Hornbill 26 14.4 1 1.3 13 7.0 White - crested Hornbill 2 1.1 0 0.0 0 0.0 CAPITONIDAE Yellow - billed Barbet 1 0.6 0 0.0 1 0.5 Speckled Tinkerbird 2 1.1 1 1.3 2 1.1 Naked - faced Barbet 7 3.9 1 1.3 31 16.8 Red - rumped Tinkerbird 1 0.6 0 0.0 1 0.5 Yellow - rumped Tinkerbird 1 0.6 0 0.0 1 0.5 Bristle - nosed Barbet 1 0.6 0 0.0 0 0.0 Yellow - throated Tinkerbird 1 0.6 0 0.0 1 0.5 Hairy - breasted Barbet 1 0.6 0 0.0 1 0.5 Vieillotis Barbet 0 0.0 1 1.3 3 1.6 Yellow - spotted Barbet 0 0.0 0 0.0 1 0.5 COLUMBIDAE Red - eyed dove 7 3.9 1 1.3 11 5.9 Bronze - naped Pigeon 1 0.6 0 0.0 0 0.0 Tambourine dove 1 0.6 1 1.3 2 1.1 Blue - headed Dove 2 1.1 0 0.0 1 0.5 97 FAMILY COMMON NAME CLOSED REL ATIVE ABUNDANCE DEGRADED RELATIVE ABUNDANCE OPEN RELATIVE ABUNDANCE African Green Pigeon 3 1.7 2 2.5 7 3.8 Laughing dove 2 1.1 0 0.0 2 1.1 Blue - headed Wood Dove 1

110 0.6 0 0.0 0 0.0 CISTICOLIDAE
0.6 0 0.0 0 0.0 CISTICOLIDAE Olive - green Cameroptera 1 0.6 0 0.0 1 0.5 Yellow - browned Cameroptera 1 0.6 1 1.3 0 0.0 Sharpe's Apalis 3 1.7 0 0.0 2 1.1 Black - capped Apalis 2 1.1 0 0.0 0 0.0 Tawny - flanked Prinia 0 0.0 1 1.3 1 0.5 Grey - backed Cameroptera 0 0.0 1 1.3 1 0.5 CORACIIDAE Broad - billed Roller 1 0.6 0 0.0 2 1.1 Blue - throated Roller 0 0.0 0 0.0 1 0.5 CORVIDAE Pied Crow 2 1.1 8 10.1 0 0.0 CUCULIDAE Yellowbill 2 1.1 2 2.5 2 1.1 Black - throated Coucal 2 1.1 0 0.0 0 0.0 African Emerald Cuckoo 2 1.1 2 2.5 4 2.2 Klaas's Cuckoo 2 1.1 1 1.3 3 1.6 Didric Cuckoo 1 0.6 1 1.3 1 0.5 Senegal Coucal 0 0.0 0 0.0 1 0.5 Red - chested Cuckoo 0 0.0 0 0.0 1 0.5 DICRURIDAE Velvet - mantled Drongo 11 6.1 2 2.5 4 2.2 Shining Drongo 7 3.9 2 2.5 2 1.1 ESTRILDIDAE Grey - headed Negrofinch 1 0.6 2 2.5 1 0.5 Chestnut - breasted Negrofinch 0 0.0 1 1.3 0 0.0 MALACONOTIDAE Brown - crowned Tchagra 0 0.0 0 0.0 1 0.5 98 FAMILY COMMON NAME CLOSED REL ATIVE ABUNDANCE DEGRADED RELATIVE ABUNDANCE OPEN RELATIVE ABUNDANCE MEROPIDAE White - throated Bee - eater 0 0.0 17 21.5 20 10.8 MONARCHIDAE Red - bellied Paradise Flycatcher 2 1.1 0 0.0 1 0.5 MUSCICAPIDAE Dusky - blue Fly

111 catcher 1 0.6 0 0.0 0 0.0
catcher 1 0.6 0 0.0 0 0.0 Ussher's Flycatcher 1 0.6 0 0.0 0 0.0 Spotted Flycatcher 0 0.0 1 1.3 0 0.0 Little - grey Flycatcher 0 0.0 0 0.0 3 1.6 MUSOPHAGIDAE Green Turaco 3 1.7 0 0.0 1 0.5 NECTARINIIDAE Buff - throated sunbird 1 0.6 0 0.0 2 1.1 Beautiful Sunbird 2 1.1 0 0.0 0 0.0 Olive Sunbird 0 0.0 0 0.0 2 1.1 ORIOLIDAE Western Black - headed Oriole 3 1.7 1 1.3 2 1.1 Black - winged Oriole 1 0.6 1 1.3 1 0.5 PHASIANIDAE Ahanta Francolin 0 0.0 2 2.5 0 0.0 PICIDAE Fire - bellied Woodpecker 2 1.1 0 0.0 2 1.1 Buff - spotted Woodpecker 6 3.3 0 0.0 0 0.0 PLATYSTEIRIDAE Black - and - White Flycatcher 2 1.1 0 0.0 0 0.0 Common Wattle - eye 2 1.1 0 0.0 0 0.0 Chestnut Wattle - eye 2 1.1 0 0.0 1 0.5 PLOCEIDAE Red - headed Malimbe 8 4.4 4 5.1 0 0.0 Black - necked Weaver 0 0.0 3 3.8 0 0.0 Vieillotis Black Weaver 0 0.0 1 1.3 0 0.0 Yellow - mantled Weaver 0 0.0 2 2.5 0 0.0 PRIONOPIDAE Red - billed Helmet shrike 10 5.6 0 0.0 0 0.0 PYCNONOTIDAE Simple Leaflove 1 0.6 0 0.0 3 1.6 99 FAMILY COMMON NAME CLOSED REL ATIVE ABUNDANCE DEGRADED RELATIVE ABUNDANCE OPEN RELATIVE ABUNDANCE Swamp Palm Bulbul 2 1.1 0 0.0 1 0.5 IcterineGreenbul 2 1.1 2 2.5 1 0.5 Little Greenbul 1 0.6

112 2 2.5 2 1.1 Western Bearded Gr
2 2.5 2 1.1 Western Bearded Greenbul 3 1.7 1 1.3 0 0.0 Slender - billed Greenbul 6 3.3 0 0.0 5 2.7 Western Nicatar 2 1.1 0 0.0 1 0.5 Common Garden Bulbul 0 0.0 2 2.5 11 5.9 PSITTACIDAE Green Parrot 1 0.6 0 0.0 1 0.5 RALIIDAE White - spotted Flufftail 1 0.6 0 0.0 0 0.0 STURNIDAE Splendid Glossy Starling 5 2.8 0 0.0 4 2.2 SYLVIIDAE Green Hylia 1 0.6 1 1.3 3 1.6 Green Crombec 1 0.6 0 0.0 1 0.5 Grey Longbill 0 0.0 1 1.3 0 0.0 TIMALIIDAE Brown Illadopsis 1 0.6 0 0.0 1 0.5 TURDIDAE Forest Robin 1 0.6 0 0.0 0 0.0 Forest scrab Robin 1 0.6 0 0.0 2 1.1 African Thrush 0 0.0 2 2.5 1 0.5 White - tailed Alethe 0 0.0 0 0.0 1 0.5 ZOSTEROPIDAE Yellow White - eye 1 0.6 0 0.0 0 0.0 TOTAL 180 100.0 79 100.0 185 100.0 100 APPENDIX 12 B: MAMMALS (FAUNA SURVE Y, MAY 2015.) FAMILY COMMON NAME CLOSE D REL. ABUNDANCE DEGRADE D REL. ABUNDANCE OPEN REL. ABUNDANCE ARTIODACTYLA Bushbuck 4 25.0 4 50.00 5 27.8 Maxwell's duiker 3 18.8 0 0.00 3 16.7 Black Duiker 1 6.3 1 12.50 1 5.6 Bay Duiker 0 0.0 0 0.00 1 5.6 RODENTIA Brush Tail Porcupine 1 6.3 2 25.00 3 16.7 Giant Forest Squirrel 0 0.0 0 0.00 2 11.1 PHOLIDOTA Triscuspid Pangolin* 1 6.3 0 0.00 0 0.0 Tree Pang

113 olin* 1 6.3 0 0.00 0 0.0 P
olin* 1 6.3 0 0.00 0 0.0 PRIMATA Mona Monkey* 1 6.3 0 0.00 0 0.0 CARNIVORA Civet Cat 2 12.5 0 0.00 1 5.6 Forest Genet 1 6.3 0 0.00 1 5.6 Mash Mongoose 1 6.3 0 0.00 1 5.6 Cusimanse Mongoose 0 0.0 1 12.50 0 0.0 101 TINTE BEPO MANAGEMENT PLAN 2016 - 2026 BUDGET ACTIVITY COST MATERIAL COST Prescribed treatment Unit / m / dys Targets / Quantity Unit cost (GHꈀ) Amount (GHꈀ) Material Unit cost (GH ꈩ Quantity Amount (GHꈀ) Total (GHꈀ) 3.1 PRODU CTION ZONE: To manage the reserve on the basis of utmost sustained yield and to increase the proportion of economic timber sp ecies, non - timber produce and lesser used species for the benefit of stakeholders. 3.1.1 To sustainably manage approximately 339 .21ha of productive natural forest area to yield an estimated 7,200m3 of harvestable volume of timber in the Reserve within three years which has a potential of generating revenue of Sixty - Three Thousand Ghana Cedis (GHꈀ63,000.00). 3.1.1.1 Carry out compartment Survey and pillaring km 14.40 100.00 1,440.00 Chainsaw, Cutlass, GPS, Presmatic compass, Linear tape Lum p sum 23,500.00 24,940.00 3.1.1.2 Carry out 100% yield marking of all timber species above 50cm dbh. ha 339.21 50.00 16,960.50 Wellington Boots, Raincoat,Un iform, Scriber Lum p sum 20,000.00 36,960.50 3.1.1.3 Monitor and supervise

114 timber harvesting operations compt.
timber harvesting operations compt. 3 3,900.00 11,700.00 Field books, Diameter Tape, Long Tape Measure, Lum p sum 1,500.00 13,200.00 3.1.1.4 Carry out Post Harvest Checks and issue compartment closure certificate. compt. 3 1,000.00 3,000.00 3,000.00 Sub - Total 33,100.50 45,000.00 78,100.50 3.1.2 To restock harvested or disturbed compartments (open canopies and low stocking) with desirable commercial species, and regene ration assessment carried out every two (2) years. Inducing Natural Regeneration (ha) 3.1.2.1 Undertake natural regeneration through assessment of regenerative capacity of timber species ha 100 100.00 10,000.00 - - - - 10,000.00 3.1.2.2 Undertake Enrichment Planting of economic indigenous timber species at a spacing of 8m X 8m (Ceiba, Celtis,chenchen) ha 2,914.84 120.00 349,780.80 Selected Indigenous species, Headpan, Mattock 100.0 0 781 78,100.00 427,880.80 102 ACTIVITY COST MATERIAL COST Prescribed treatment Unit / m / dys Targets / Quantity Unit cost (GHꈀ) Amount (GHꈀ) Material Unit cost (GH ꈩ Quantity Amount (GHꈀ) Total (GHꈀ) 3..1.2. 3 Undertake coppice Management of tree species with potential to coppice shoots like Wawa, Ceiba ha 200 500.00 100,000.00 Ladder, Cutlass, Chainsaw 1,000 .00 2 2,000.00 102,000.00 Sub - Total 459,780.80 80,100.

115 00 539,880.80 TOTAL PRODUCTION
00 539,880.80 TOTAL PRODUCTION 492,881.30 125,100.00 617,981.30 3.2 PROTECTION ZONE: To improve the protective functions of the forest ecosystems and ensure biodiversity conservation and environmental service functions of the reserve. 3.2.1 To maintain the external and internal boundaries of the Reserve. 3.2.1.1 Erect Reserve Sign Post at key entry points of the reserve Lumpsum Sign Post 800.0 0 20 16,000.00 16,000.00 3.2.1.2 Identify defaced, broken and missing boundary pillars Lumpsum 10,000.00 10,000.00 3.2.1.3 Replacement of defaced, broken and missing boundary pillars within the first five years of the plan period. Lumpsum 10,000.00 10,000.00 3.2.1.4 Clean a total external boundary perimeter of 64.62km twice a year. km 64.62 168.75 10,904.63 10,904.75 3.2.1.5 Inspect a total external boundary perimeter of 64.62km twice a year. km 64.62 12.50 807.75 807.75 3.2.1.6 Patrol a total external boundary perimeter of 64.62km twice a year. km 64.62 7.50 484.65 484.75 3.2.1.7 Plant 34km of external and 10.56km of internal boundaries with desirable tree species each year within the plan period. km 34 75.00 2,550.00 Seedlings 1.00 5,000 5,000.00 7,550.00 Sub - Total 34,747.03 21,000.00 55,747.25 3.2.2 To sa

116 feguard individual species using fine gr
feguard individual species using fine grain protection measures and exemption from exploitation. 3.2.2.1 Protect key (star rated) species identified in the Forest Reserve areas and conduct enrichment planting where necessary. Lumpsum 20,000.00 20,000.00 3.2.2.2 Study the natural regeneration of potential timber species. Lumpsum 10,000.00 10,000.00 3.2.2.3 Tend natural regenerated timber seedlings to enhance growth. Lumpsum 10,000.00 10,000.00 103 ACTIVITY COST MATERIAL COST Prescribed treatment Unit / m / dys Targets / Quantity Unit cost (GHꈀ) Amount (GHꈀ) Material Unit cost (GH ꈩ Quantity Amount (GHꈀ) Total (GHꈀ) 3.2.2.4 Identify environmental factors enhancing and limiting regeneration ability of the species. Lumpsum 10,000.00 10,000.00 3.2.2.5 Enforce hunting regulation during the close season. Lumpsum 10,000.00 10,000.00 Sub - Total 60,000.00 60,000.00 3.2.3 To protect the entire hilly area of the Reserve comprising of 26 compartments for ecological value for both flora and fauna. 3.2.3.1 Collection of NTFPS will be restricted to domestic use. Lumpsum 5,000.00 5,000.00 3.2.3.2 No logging will be allowed in this area. Lumpsum 5,000.00

117 5,000.00 3.2.3.3 Enc roachment wil
5,000.00 3.2.3.3 Enc roachment will not be entertained. Lumpsum 5,000.00 5,000.00 Sub - Total 15,000.00 15,000.00 3.2.4 To protect the swamp area of the Reserve comprising 112.04ha. 3.2.4.1 No logging will be allowed in this area. Lumpsum 5,000.00 5,000.00 3.2.4.1 Hunting of wildlife will be restricted. Lumpsum 5,000.00 5,000.00 3.2.4.1 Tre es located within 25m and 50m at both banks of streams will not be allowed for felling. Lumpsum 5,000.00 5,000.00 Sub - Total 15,000.00 15,000.00 3.2.5 To manage the catchment areas of the streams to improve water quality, ensure continuous flow of water along the streams and prevent them from drying up. 3.2.5.1 Maintain water flow and reduce sedimentation of the streams within the Reserve by planting fast growing, evergreen trees with high water - use efficiency, and fire resistant tree species along the banks of streams at appropriate off - set distances. Tree speci es such as subaha is recommendable for this buffer planting. Lumpsum 10,000.00 10,000.00 3.2.5.1 Ensure that no tree is felled within 50m on both sides of streams and 25m on both sides of streams as prescribed in the logging manual. Lumpsum 5,000.00 5,000.00 104 ACTIVITY COST MATERIAL

118 COST Prescribed treatment U
COST Prescribed treatment Unit / m / dys Targets / Quantity Unit cost (GHꈀ) Amount (GHꈀ) Material Unit cost (GH ꈩ Quantity Amount (GHꈀ) Total (GHꈀ) 3.2.5.1 Undertake regular monitoring of buffer zones of the streams. Lumpsum 5,000.00 5,000.00 Sub - Total 20,000.00 20,000.00 3.2.6 To implement wildfire preventive measures in the entire Forest Reserve in collaboration with the communities. 3.2.6.1 Pre - suppression activities shall include construction of green firebreaks, clearing of firebreaks, fire tracing, and early burning. Lumpsum 10,000.00 10,000.00 3.2.6.2 For m and organize Fire Volunteer Squads (FVS) for the fringe communities through collaboration with FC, GNFS and the District Assembly. Lumpsum 10,000.00 10,000.00 3.2.6.3 Construct Fire Ride Km 10 1,250.00 12,500.00 12,500.00 3.2.6.4 Maintain Fire Ride Km 10 750.00 7,500.00 7,500.00 3.2.6.5 Educate and sensitize communities on the need to prevent wildfires. Lumpsum 40,000.00 40,000.00 Sub - Total 80,000.00 80,000.00 3.2.7 To eradicate invasive species 3.2.7.1 Chemical treatment (glyphosphate - based) will be used for the eradication of Broussonetia papyr

119 ifera (York) and Chromolaena odorata
ifera (York) and Chromolaena odorata (Acheampong) which have invaded some open patches in the Reserve. Lumpsum Chemicals 20,000.00 20,000.00 Sub - Total 20,000.00 TOTAL PROTECTION 265,747.25 3.3 REFORESTATION ZONE: To ensure the restoration of degraded forest areas through reforestation. 3.3.1 To reforest forty (40) degraded compartments covering an area of 5,370.46ha. 105 ACTIVITY COST MATERIAL COST Prescribed treatment Unit / m / dys Targets / Quantity Unit cost (GHꈀ) Amount (GHꈀ) Material Unit cost (GH ꈩ Quantity Amount (GHꈀ) Total (GHꈀ) 3.3.1.1 Carry out survey and demarcation ha 5,370.46 150.00 805,569.00 Vehicle (Fuel) - - 200.00 805,769.00 3.3.1.2 Undertake Land /site Preparation ha 5,370.46 1,000.00 5,370,460.00 Vehicle (Fuel) - - 1,000.00 5,371,460.00 3.3.1.3 Cut Pegs to cover area prepared (781/Ha) No. 4,194,330 100.00 419,433,000.00 Seedlings Procurement 0.50 4,194,330 2,097,165.0 0 421,530,165.00 3.3.1.4 Carry out Pegging in area prepared ha 5,370.46 150.00 805,569.00 Vehicle (Fuel) - - 200.00 805,769.00 3.3.1.5 Distribution of Potted Seedlings No. 5,370.46 100.00 537,046.00 Vehicle (Fuel) - - 200.00 537,246.00 3.3.1.6 Plant Potted Seedlings ha 5,370.46 150.00 805,569.00 Vehicle (Fuel) - - 1,00

120 0.00 806,569.00 3.3.1.7 Carry out
0.00 806,569.00 3.3.1.7 Carry out Survival Survey ha 5,370.46 50.00 268,523.00 Vehicle (Fuel) - - 200.00 268,723.00 3.3.1.8 Beat up where mortalility is high. ha 5,370.46 50.00 268,523.00 Vehicle (Fuel) - - 200.00 268,723.00 3.3.1.9 Construct Fire Ride to protect plantations from wildfires Km 649.83 1,250.00 812,287.50 Vehicle (Fuel) - - 200.00 812,487.50 Sub - Total 429,106,546.50 2,100,365.0 0 431,206,911.50 3.3.2 To manage 1,155ha of 2003 - 2007 (MTS) and 2011 - 2013 (NFPDP) established 3.3.2.1 Carry out tending and prunning of all established plantation areas ha 5,370.46 500.00 2,685,230.00 Vehicle (Fuel) - - 1,000.00 2,686,230.00 3.3.2.2 Mai ntain fire rides around plantation to prevent any perennial wildfires Km 5,370.46 750.00 4,027,845.00 Vehicle (Fuel) - - 1,000.00 4,028,845.00 3.3.2.3 Carry out fire patrol during dry season around the plantation areas in the reserve km 5,370.46 300.00 1,611,138.00 Vehicle (Fuel) - - 1,000.00 1,612,138.00 3.3.2.4 Thi nning of Plantation ha 100 500.00 50,000.00 Vehicle (Fuel) - - 1,000.00 51,000.00 Sub - Total 8,374,213.00 4,000.00 8,378,213.00 TOTAL REFORESTATION 437,480,759.50 2,104,365.0 0 439,585,124.50 3.4 GOVERNANCE AND BENEFIT SHARING: To improve forest governance through

121 effective collaboration with all stakeho
effective collaboration with all stakeholders. 3.4.1 To manage twenty - two (22) admitted farms covering an area of 83.6ha 106 ACTIVITY COST MATERIAL COST Prescribed treatment Unit / m / dys Targets / Quantity Unit cost (GHꈀ) Amount (GHꈀ) Material Unit cost (GH ꈩ Quantity Amount (GHꈀ) Total (GHꈀ) 3.4.1.1 Identify all blocked boundaries of the 22 admitted farms by the end of the third year of the plan period. Km 10.56 168.75 1,782.00 Moulding of Pillars 25.00 100 2,500.00 4,282.00 3.4.1.2 Ope ning up of all the blocked boundaries of the 22 admitted farms by the end of the third year of the plan period. Lumpsum Lumpsum 10,000.00 10,000.00 3.4.1.3 Check survey the 22 admitted farms every two (2) years to ensure that they are not illegally extended. Km 10.56 168.75 1,782.00 Vehicle (Fuel) Lumpsum 5,000.00 6,782.00 3.4.1.4 Pillaring of the 22 admitted farms by the end of the five (5) year of the plan period. Km 10.56 300.00 3,168.00 3,168.00 3.4.1.5 Mai ntenance of 22 admitted farms boundaries as per maintenance schedule. Km Lumpsum 40,000 40,000.00 Sub - Total 6,732.00 57,500.00 64,232.00 3.4.2 To collaborate with forest fringe communities to identify, assess and sustainably manage the harvesting of Non Timber Forest Products (NTFPs). 3.4.2

122 .1 Identify and document the location
.1 Identify and document the location of all NTFPs in the Forest Reserve. Lumpsum 20,000.00 20,000.00 3.4.2.2 Undertake inventory to determine key NTFP stocking levels (quantities) and their distribution in the Reserve. Lumpsum 20,000.00 20,000.00 3.4.2.3 Explore the potential of propagating some of the desirable NTFPs including pestles and chewing sticks ( Nsokodua ). Lumpsum 20,000.00 20,000.00 3.4.2.4 Permits will be issued for collection of NTFPs. Lumpsum 5,000.00 5,000.00 3.4.2.5 Mon itoring of NTFP harvesting activities in Forest Reserve shall be undertaken in accordance with the harvesting rules. Lumpsum 5,000.00 5,000.00 Sub - Total 70,000.00 70,000.00 3.4.3 To ensure that domestic and communal rights are fully respected. 3.4.3.1 Forest fringe communities shall have regulated access to the Reserve to collect NTFPs for domestic use. Lumpsum 2,000.00 2,000.00 107 ACTIVITY COST MATERIAL COST Prescribed treatment Unit / m / dys Targets / Quantity Unit cost (GHꈀ) Amount (GHꈀ) Material Unit cost (GH ꈩ Quantity Amount (GHꈀ) Total (GHꈀ) 3.4.3.2 Permit will have to be obtained from the FSD before NTFP can be harvested on commercial quantities. Lumpsum 2,000.00 2,000.00 3.4.3.3 Co

123 m munities will have free access to unde
m munities will have free access to undertake health walk through the reserve and enjoy aesthetic value of the forest. Lumpsum 2,000.00 2,000.00 3.4.3.4 Benefit sharing arrangements shall follow the provisions specified in FC - Benefit Sharing Agreement Documents for commercial forest plantation development under the Public Private Partnership. Lumpsum 8,000.00 Public Address systems, Vehicle (Fuel) 2,000.00 10,000.00 3.4.3.5 The communities living around the Forest Reserve shall be given opportunities for employment and training. The rights of workers to organize and voluntarily negotiate with their employers shall be guaranteed as outlined in conventions 87 an d 98 of the ILO. Lumpsum 2,000.00 2,000.00 Sub - Total 16,000.00 2,000.00 18,000.00 3.4.4 To facilitate the establishment of livelihood interventions appropriate in the forest fringe communities to improve their liv ing standard. 3.4.4.1 Develop appropriate alternative livelihood options in consultation with the communities. Lumpsum 2,000.00 2,000.00 3.4.4.2 Formation of alternative livelihood groups in Communities. Lumpsum 10 5,000.00 - - - - 5,000.00 3.4.4.3 Training of Communities in their preferred alternative livelihood option. Lumpsum 10 20,000.00 Breakfast, Snack, Lunch 30.00 100 3,000.00 23,000.00 3.4.4.4 Monitor and supervi

124 se alternative livelihood options estab
se alternative livelihood options established for communities to ensure their success. Lumpsum 10 5,000.00 - - - - 5,000.00 Sub - Total 32,000.00 3,000.00 35,000.00 3.4.5 To ensure compliance of all law and regulations in the management of the Reserve. 3.4.5.1 Make use of existing systems (VPA - LAS system/Rapid response/FC Prosecutors/Police) towards effective forest and wildlife surveillance. Lumpsum 10,000.00 10,000.00 Sub - Total 10,000.00 10,000.00 108 ACTIVITY COST MATERIAL COST Prescribed treatment Unit / m / dys Targets / Quantity Unit cost (GHꈀ) Amount (GHꈀ) Material Unit cost (GH ꈩ Quantity Amount (GHꈀ) Total (GHꈀ) 3.4.6 To ensure equitable sharing of revenue. 3.4.6.1 Ensure that the socio - economic needs of the forest fringe communities, particularly Social Responsibility Agreement (SRA) commitment is met in full for the benefit of the people. Lumpsum 10,000.00 10,000.00 Sub - Total 10,000.00 10,000.00 TOTAL GOVERNANCE 207,232.00 3.5 RESEARCH: To protect, maintain and enhance research plots within the reserve for education and other purposes. 3.5.1 To protect, maintain and enhance research plots within the reserve for education and other purposes. 3.5.1.1 Maintain and protect

125 One (1) Compartment for Students rese
One (1) Compartment for Students research Lumpsum 5,000.00 5,000.00 3.5.1.2 All PSPs pillars within the Forest Reserve shall be maintained and removed/broken ones will be replaced with assistance from RMSC. Lumpsum 20,000.00 20,000.00 3.5.1.3 Conduct research into the regeneration ability of the Reserve especially in the Convalescence Areas. Lumpsum 20,000.00 20,000.00 3.5.1.4 Demarcate and pillar permanent sample plots (PSPs). No. 11 500.00 5,500.00 Vehicle (Fuel) Lumpsum 2,000.00 7,500.00 3.5.1. Unde rtake research into flora and fauna dynamics overtime, to inform management decision. Lumpsum 5,000.00 5,000.00 3.5.1.1 Sensitize fringe communities on the Protection of Research Sites (PSPs) Lumpsum 15,000.00 15,000.00 TOTAL 70,500.00 2,000.00 72,500.00 3.6 SUPPORTING AUXILIARY : To facilitate the smooth implementation of operational activities in the Forest Reserve. 3.6.1 To provide access to forest for staff ans stakeholder to facilitate the effective implementation of this plan. Re - shappi ng of Key Forest Roads in the Reserve. Lumpsum 200,000.00 - - - - 200,000.00 Sub Total 200,000.00 200,000.00 3.6.2 To pr ovide accommodation for field staff. 109 ACT

126 IVITY COST MATERIAL COST Pre
IVITY COST MATERIAL COST Prescribed treatment Unit / m / dys Targets / Quantity Unit cost (GHꈀ) Amount (GHꈀ) Material Unit cost (GH ꈩ Quantity Amount (GHꈀ) Total (GHꈀ) Constructions of Three (3) Range Quarters are proposed to be constructed at Wioso, Abesewa and Brosankro. No. 3 70,000.00 210,000.00 - - - - 210,000.00 Construct ion of temporary structures for the FC Rapid Response Teams, to re - enforce protection of the Forest Reserve. Lumpsum 20,000.00 20,000.00 Sub Total 230,000.00 230,000.00 3.6.3 To pr ovide adequate means of transportation for FSD staff to facilitate the effective implementation of this plan. Procure a four - wheel drive pick - up truck for the District Office for use in their monitoring activities. No 1 90,000.00 90,000.00 - - - - 90,000.00 Procure Three(3) motor cycles for the field staff for their day to day activities. No 3 20,000.00 60,000.00 - - - - 60,000.00 Sub Total 150,000.00 150,000.00 3.6.4 To assist Telecoms to provide network services to all and sundry. FSD shall collaborate with the Service Providers (Vodafone, Tigo, MTN, Airtel and Glo) to protect the Reserve through fire patrols in the dry season. Yr 10 4,000.00 40,000.00 40,000.00

127 Sub Total 40,000.00
Sub Total 40,000.00 40,000.00 3.6.5 To pr ovide Office equipment and consumables. 3.6.5.1 Procure a desk top computer and accessories for Dist. Office Lumpsum 2 10,000.00 20,000.00 20,000.00 3.6.5.2 Pro cure a digital camera for field work Lumpsum 1 500.00 500.00 500.00 3.6.5.3 Procure office stationary Lumpsum 1 10,000.00 10,000.00 10,000.00 Sub Total 30,500.00 30,500.00 3.7 To develop a working cultures to support health and safety at work and promote a positive social climate and smooth operation that enhance productivity. 3.7.1 Undertake training and capacity building so that managers, supervisors and all workers understand their responsibilities with respect to health and safety. No. 100 60.00 6,000.00 Gloves, Helmet, Goggles 25.00 300 7,500.00 13,500.00 110 ACTIVITY COST MATERIAL COST Prescribed treatment Unit / m / dys Targets / Quantity Unit cost (GHꈀ) Amount (GHꈀ) Material Unit cost (GH ꈩ Quantity Amount (GHꈀ) Total (GHꈀ) 3.7.2 Provide readily available health care access in the form of First Aid tool kit for working foresters in the field. Lumpsum 5,000.00 5,000.00 5,000.00 Sub - Total 11,000.00 7,500.00 18,500.00 TOTAL AUXILIARY SUPPORT 669,000.

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