Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening - Description

14 September 2017. Welcome to Sixth Form Evening. The vision for the Sixth Form…. …to . raise the aspirations. . of our young adults by nurturing a . passion for learning. , . enriching. . the student experience and securing outcomes which . ID: 620848 Download Presentation

26K - views

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

14 September 2017. Welcome to Sixth Form Evening. The vision for the Sixth Form…. …to . raise the aspirations. . of our young adults by nurturing a . passion for learning. , . enriching. . the student experience and securing outcomes which .

Similar presentations


Download Presentation

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening




Download Presentation - The PPT/PDF document "Welcome to Sixth Form Evening" is the property of its rightful owner. Permission is granted to download and print the materials on this web site for personal, non-commercial use only, and to display it on your personal computer provided you do not modify the materials and that you retain all copyright notices contained in the materials. By downloading content from our website, you accept the terms of this agreement.



Presentation on theme: "Welcome to Sixth Form Evening"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

14 September 2017

Slide2

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

The vision for the Sixth Form…

…to

raise the aspirations

of our young adults by nurturing a

passion for learning

,

enriching

the student experience and securing outcomes which

exceed their expectations

Slide3

Slide4

Name

University

Course

Georgina Allison

University of Brighton

Primary Education (QTS)

Thomas Bache

University of Leeds

Film and Media

Jade Baker

University of Greenwich

Events Management

Bethany Bale

University of Surrey

Politics and English Literature

Lewis Bowers-Murphy

University of Greenwich

Business Economics

Emily Burbridge

Anglia Ruskin University

Primary Education

Alex Campbell

University of Brighton

Sports and Exercise Science

Ellie Card

Canterbury Christ Church University

Psychology

Mia Clapperton

University of East Anglia

Psychology

Iain Clarke

University of Portsmouth

Business Management

Demi-Leigh Coker

University of Greenwich

Events Management

Samuel Cook

University of Essex

Business Management

Michael Crichton

University of Nottingham

MSc Chemistry

Thomas Crick

University of Kent

Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Jack Crocker

University of Winchester

History

Mitchell Crone

University of Warwick

Computer Science

Isabelle Day

Oxford Brookes University

English Literature

Lucy Dymock

Anglia Ruskin University

History

Joe Edwards

University of St. Andrew’s

Medicine

Slide5

Name

University

Course

Louise Evans

University of Coventry

Media and Communications

Steven Eyres

University of Aberystwyth

International Politics and History

Adam Fitzgerald

Birmingham City University

Civil Engineering

Alice Franklin

York St. John University

Primary Education (QTS)

Tyra Ganga

University of Bedfordshire

Psychology

Andrew Gardner

University of Portsmouth

International Relations and Politics

Rebecca Georgiou

University of Portsmouth

Psychology

Zoe Green

St. Mary’s University, Twickenham

Sports Management

Megan Grootaers

University of Kent

Comparative Literature and Drama

Ellie Hall

Anglia Ruskin University

Primary Education

Liam Harrold

University of Kent

Computer Systems Engineering

Ryan Hayward

University of Dundee

Computer Science

Morgan Hopkins

University of York

Nursing

Sadia Hoque

University of East London

Child Psychology

Zachary Hughes

Royal Holloway University, London

Computer Science

Elliott Hutchinson

Anglia Ruskin University

Business Management

April Johnston

University of Winchester

Theatre Production

Slide6

Name

University

Course

Harry Jones

University of Kent

Mathematics

Sean Keay

University of Middlesex

Computer Science

Stefan Knowles

University of Brighton

Automotive Engineering

Rhiann Lawless

London South Bank University

International Relations

Lauren Lovell

University of Brighton

Psychology

Thomas Mann

University of Essex

English Literature

Romilly Marshall

University of Newcastle

Psychology

Bethany Masson

University of Aberystwyth

Zoology

Zoe McGarvie

University of Sussex

Zoology

Chloe McMeekin

University of Kent

Sociology and Criminology

Alicia Medina-Smith

University of Hertfordshire

Psychology

Jon Morgan

King’s College, London

Electronic Engineering

James Newby

University of Manchester

Biochemistry

Carla Nichols-Foot

University of Greenwich

Sociology and Criminology

Adam Parmenter

University of Greenwich

History & English Literature

Georgia Patmore

University of Kent

Law

Slide7

Name

University

Course

Erica Pickrell

University of Southampton

Biomedical Science

Molly Prior

University of Plymouth

Psychology

Mollie Roberts

Canterbury Christ Church University

Primary Education (QTS)

Katie Steddon

Royal Holloway University, London

History

Gauri Suvarna

University of East Anglia

Medicine

Charles Thomas

Liverpool Hope University

International Relations and Politics

Amy Vaufrouard

University of Brighton

Mathematics

Jasmine Warner

University of Loughborough

Sports and Exercise Science

Daniel Waterman

Queen Mary University, London

Mathematics

Henry Watkinson

University of Manchester

Physics and Astrophysics

Chelsea Weston

University of Kent

Policing with Criminal Psychology

Isabelle Wetton

Brunel University, London

Biomedical Sciences

Thomas Wilkins

University of Cambridge

Natural Sciences

Slide8

Slide9

What does the Sixth Form involve?

3 or 4 subjects in Year 12 to AS Level, 3 subjects in Year 13 to full A LevelA voluntary Extended Project Qualification (EPQ) across 15 monthsCurriculum Enrichment on Wednesday afternoonsBuilding an impressive portfolio to impress Admissions Tutors and EmployersDeveloping academically, personally and socially

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide10

What are the school’s expectations of students?

Professional environmentAtmosphere conducive to studySetting their own expectations highSeeking to make a valuable contribution inside and outside the classroomRaising aspirations

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide11

Who are the key staff involved?

Personal Tutor (maximum of 16 students per Tutor Group)A Level subject teachers (usually two per subject)

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide12

Who are the key staff involved?

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Helen Banks

Head of Year 13

Tony Woods

Head of Year 12

Alick Robertson

Head of Sixth Form

Jenny Clements

UCAS / EPQ

Coordinator

Jan Abel

Sixth Form Administrator

Slide13

13

What do you consider to be the three most significant roles that a Sixth Form prefect will fulfil?

A Level

changed in September 2015. The changes were phased in across three years. Curriculum reform is now complete, and it affects all new Year 12 students in the Sixth Form.

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide14

14

What do you consider to be the three most significant roles that a Sixth Form prefect will fulfil?

What changes took place?

AS Levels have been decoupled from A Levels to become freestanding qualifications. This means that AS results will no longer count towards the A Level. Students will be assessed in all subjects at A Level at the end of Year 13 on everything they have learned over two years in the Sixth Form.

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide15

15

What do you consider to be the three most significant roles that a Sixth Form prefect will fulfil?

How will I be assessed in the Sixth Form at

Sweyne Park?All students will sit AS Levels in all subjects at the end of Year 12. However, AS exam results in those subjects will not count towards the final A Level grade.

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide16

16

What do you consider to be the three most significant roles that a Sixth Form prefect will fulfil?

Why does

Sweyne Park still enter students for AS Levels? Students have more flexibility in finalising their A Level curriculum – they can test the water in a subject before committing to full A Level, and decisions do not need to be made until the end of Year 12 It provides students with a more personalised programme of study The new reformed AS provides an externally verified mock exam It retains a sense of stepped progression between GCSE and full A Level

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide17

17

What do you consider to be the three most significant roles that a Sixth Form prefect will fulfil?

How has the assessment structure changed in each subject?

Most AS Level qualifications will be assessed by examination only. The exceptions are Art, Drama, Music, Music Technology, 3D Product Design, Textiles and PE.A Level assessment in Maths, the Sciences, Modern Languages, Politics, Economics, Philosophy & Ethics, Business Studies and Psychology will be by 100% examination.In Biology, Chemistry and Physics there will also be a separate assessment for practical skills, which will be graded as either Pass or Fail.

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide18

18

What do you consider to be the three most significant roles that a Sixth Form prefect will fulfil?

How is this changing curriculum balanced with career aspirations?

Our aim as a Sixth Form is to identify clearly and to respond effectively to aspirations of individual students. In September 2016, we streamlined our provision into distinct pathways in order to clarify and reinforce our curriculum offer, to ensure that the needs of all students are being met. Students opt for either the UCAS, the Professional or the Open pathway. Students are not pigeon-holed into a pathway in September of Year 12. They can choose the appropriate provision for them, and even move between pathways as they progress.

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide19

19

What do you consider to be the three most significant roles that a Sixth Form prefect will fulfil?

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Pathway

UCAS

Open

Professional

Aspect of study

Rationale

To prepare students for Higher Education

To allow students to keep their options open for both HE and employment

To prepare students for

employment or apprenticeships

Curriculum

A

Levels*

A Levels (+ BTEC)*

BTEC

+ 1 or 2 A Levels*

Post-18 destination

University

Keeping options open

Apprenticeship or employment

Weds pm curriculum enrichment

Work experience recommended

but not compulsory

Work experience

Work experience

Validation of achievements

SPS VI Record of Achievement

EfL

Charter Plus

EfL

Charter Plus

Slide20

20

What do you consider to be the three most significant roles that a Sixth Form prefect will fulfil?

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Pathway

UCAS

Open

Professional

Aspect of study

UCAS

Compulsory

Optional

Not required

Study skills programme

EPQ programme

EPQ or employability

Employability

Facilitation

*

Unifrog

* UCAS HE Conference

* HE Evening

* UCAS workshops

* Personal UCAS mentor

* Mock UCAS interview

* Early Applicant Group

* Blue Acorns Group

Most options from UCAS and Professional pathways

* Compulsory two-week vocational work experience in Year 12

* Employability programme

* Apprenticeships conference

* Essex Skills Unit access

* Mock job interview

Slide21

Why is Year 12 so important?

AS grades always have a significant bearing on A2 gradesYou will need to revisit your Year 12 material at the end of Year 13 for full A LevelUniversities make conditional offers based on predicted grades. The basis of this prediction is largely based on AS results.

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide22

What is the style of A Level work like?

Hugely different from GCSEAS classes are smallerYou see more than one subject specialist teacher several times a week – good working relations are essentialTeachers do not spoon-feed – they direct, advise, facilitate and encourage

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide23

How much work should students expect?

Unlike GCSE, there is no homework timetableExpect homework every nightAround 4 hours per subject per week is recommended, i.e. 20 hours in total in addition to timetabled lessons

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide24

How do students adjust to this new style?

Students must prepare for lessons in advanceGet into the habit of making notes in class and writing them up at homeOrganise your notes and files appropriatelyMake use of a student planner or diary. Record all work set and note down deadlinesRevision should be an ongoing process. You cannot leave everything until Easter.

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide25

How do students balance so much in so little time?

Organisation is essentialPrioritise – progress at A Level is more important than extra-curricular pursuits Limit the number of hours’ paid employment you do Pace yourself – get lots of sleep!If you feel overwhelmed, ask for help!

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide26

How do students excel in their subjects?

Use private study time wiselyInvestigate and research your subject beyond the A Level syllabusAct on teachers’ feedbackChallenge yourself with each piece of work Ensure a sensible balance between subjects

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide27

What does the Extended Project Qualification involve?

Opportunity to write or create an extended research project of entirely your choiceEITHER 6,000 word essay OR investigative field study OR extended creative projectEach student has a dedicated specialist supervisor Completed across 15 monthsScaled down version of postgraduate research project – highly valued by universities

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide28

What facilities are available to students?

Dedicated Sixth Form teaching rooms in new Sixth Form blockMaslow Library – computers and private study boothsMarie Curie IT suite – computers and meeting roomThe Atrium, The Forum, The Piazza – study café and social spaceSchool Library – huge investment in A Level books and electronic resources

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide29

What can I do at home to help my son/daughter?

Please help to reinforce our expectationsTry to ensure an effective study space around the houseLimit ‘technology time’ – TV, laptops, mobile phones, social mediaTake an active interest in progress, e.g. letters, reports, Show My Homework, discussionsLink A Level study to life in the workplace – how knowledge and transferrable skills will benefitDiscuss current affairsManage expectations (A* to E, not A* to C !)

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide30

What happens when in the Sixth Form?

September First progress report – effort gradesOctober Personalised target setting with subject tutorsNovember ‘Early applicant’ group identifiedDecember Second progress report – attainment, effort grades, attendance Charity Week

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide31

What happens when in the Sixth Form?

January Raising Aspirations Week Mock examsFebruary AS Level target setting with subject teachersMarch Third progress report – full written commentary Year 12 Consultation EveningMay AS Level exams

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide32

What happens when in the Sixth Form?

June AS to A Level transition – Year 13 teaching begins UCAS process begins Higher Education evening UCAS Higher Education Conference Employability ConferencesAugust Publication of AS exam results (Thurs 16 Aug 2018)

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide33

How does this raise the aspirations of my son/daughter?

 Small tutor groupsPersonalised approach to form tutoring – undergraduate-style ‘Personal Tutors’Generous staff/student ratio in A Level classesInvestment in personal developmentBespoke, individualised provision through pathways programme

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening

Slide34

Feel free to ask questions

on the way out

Welcome to Sixth Form Evening