RHETORICAL ANALYSIS
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RHETORICAL ANALYSIS

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RHETORICAL ANALYSIS




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Presentation on theme: "RHETORICAL ANALYSIS"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

RHETORICAL ANALYSIS

SIMILE

METAPHOR

ALLUSION

HYPERBOLE

UNDERSTATEMENT

Slide2

Rhetorical Analysis

What the Author Does

Rhetorical devices are the tools the writer uses to produce the writing. Rhetorical technique is the way that the author uses these tools or devices.

What You Do

Rhetorical

a

nalysis

 is

looking at

HOW the author writes, rather than WHAT

he

actually wrote. To do this, you

will analyze

 the

devices

and

techniques

the author uses to achieve his

goal

or purpose of writing

his

piece.

Slide3

Rhetorical Devices

SimileMetaphorAllusionHyperboleUnderstatement

Slide4

SIMILES: A figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things, using explicit words such as like, as, resembles, or than.Eva’s eyes are as green as emeralds.The moon shines like a fifty-cent piece.A complexion smoother than polished marbleA mind resembling a deep cave

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Slide5

METAPHOR: A figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things, in which one becomes another thing without the use of the words like, as, than, or resembles.Direct metaphor directly compares the two things by the use of a verb such as is. The city is a sleeping woman.Implied metaphor implies or suggests the comparison between the two things, without using is. The city sleeps peacefully.

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Slide6

ALLUSION: is an indirect reference to another idea, person, place event, artwork, etc., or to the meaning of the work in which it appears. Allusions can be mythological, biblical, historical, literary, political or contemporary.The writer assumes that the audience or a specific part of the audience will already have knowledge about the item being referred to.“The killer wore the mark of Cain as he stalked his brother”Biblical story of Cain and Abel“Hiroshima”Reference to the Japanese city destroyed by the atomic bomb

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Slide7

HYPERBOLE: An exaggeration or overstatement to emphasize a point or to achieve a specific effect that can be serious, humorous, sarcastic, or even ironic. So you have turned on the TV broadcast of your favorite football team’s afternoon game. The commentators are excited to tell the audience what a great game it’s going to be, with the two unbeatable quarterbacks of these two super teams battling it out on their way to winning the greatest of sports trophies, the immortal coach Lombardi trophy.If I don’t eat something right away, I’ll starve.

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Slide8

UNDERSTATEMENT: the other side of hyperbole. A writer uses this to minimize the obvious importance of someone or something, assuming that the audience knows the subject’s significance. As with hyperbole, the intended effect of understatement can be serious, humorous, sarcastic, or ironic. In many case, it indicates politeness, humility or tact. To hear a firefighter describe the rescue of a family from its fiery home as “just doing my job” is an example of understatement. Here the firefighter is being humble about his bravery, and the effect on the audience is ironic.World hunger can be solved by giving everyone food.

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Slide9

1. RHETORICAL ANALYSIS: Rhetorical devices are the tools the writer uses to produce the writing. Rhetorical technique is the way that the author uses these tools or devices.2. SIMILES: A figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things, using explicit words such as like, as, resembles, or than.3. METAPHOR: A figure of speech that makes a comparison between two unlike things, in which one becomes another thing without the use of the words like, as, than, or resembles.4.ALLUSION: An indirect reference to another idea, person, place event, artwork, etc., to the meaning of the work in which it appears.5. HYPERBOLE: An exaggeration used to emphasize a point.6.UNDERSTATEMENT: The other side of hyperbole. A writer uses this to minimize the obvious importance of someone or something, assuming that the audience knows the subject’s significance

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Slide10

1.A fantastic young hitter on a baseball team is called the “new Hank Aaron” by the local sportswriters. 2.In Mark Twain’s “Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” the claim that Jim Smiley would follow a bug as far as Mexico to win a bet is a hyperbole of comic effect. 3. A road is used to go places. 4. In “The Scarlet Ibis”, it says: “I did not know then that pride is a wonderful, terrible thing, a seed that bears two, vines, life and death.  5. “The muscles on his brawny arms are as strong as iron bands”

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Slide11

1.A fantastic young hitter on a baseball team is called the “new Hank Aaron” by the local sportswriters. Allusion2.In Mark Twain’s “Notorious Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” the claim that Jim Smiley would follow a bug as far as Mexico to win a bet is a hyperbole of comic effect. Hyperbole3. A road is used to go places. Understatement (Oversimplification)4. In “The Scarlet Ibis”, it says: “I did not know then that pride is a wonderful, terrible thing, a seed that bears two, vines, life and death.  Metaphor5. “The muscles on his brawny arms are as strong as iron bands”Simile

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Slide12

1. And we looked straight into the eyes of the Council, but their eyes were as cold blue glass buttons. (From Anthem) 2. But we could not follow, for we were losing the puddle of light behind us. (From Anthem) 3. Romeo and Juliet is a romantic tragedy. 4. You could liquidate the stock here and feed an African nation for a year. 5. 5. I was surprised his nose was not growing like Pinocchio’s

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Slide13

1. And we looked straight into the eyes of the Council, but their eyes were as cold blue glass buttons. (From Anthem) SIMILE 2. But we could not follow, for we were losing the puddle of light behind us. (From Anthem) METAPHOR3. Romeo and Juliet is a romantic tragedy. UNDERSTATEMENT4. You could liquidate the stock here and feed an African nation for a year. HYPERBOLE5. I was surprised his nose was not growing like Pinocchio’s ALLUSION

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Slide14

1. In the state football playoffs, the Tigers were a real Cinderella team. 2. Rainsford from “The Most Dangerous Game” describes himself: “I was the mouse to the Cossack’s cat.” 3. Celebrities are all important people. 4. Romeo and Juliet “O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!” 5. Isaac Singer “The short story is like a room to be unfurnished; the novel is like a warehouse.”

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Slide15

1. In the state football playoffs, the Tigers were a real Cinderella team. ALLUSION2. Rainsford from “The Most Dangerous Game” describes himself: “I was the mouse to the Cossack’s cat.” METAPHOR 3. Celebrities are all important people. OVERSIMPLIFICATION4. Romeo and Juliet “O, she doth teach the torches to burn bright!” HYPERBOLE5. Isaac Singer “The short story is like a room to be unfurnished; the novel is like a warehouse.” SIMILE

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