Assisting Student Veterans in Their Transition: Two Successful
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Assisting Student Veterans in Their Transition: Two Successful

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Assisting Student Veterans in Their Transition: Two Successful




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Presentation on theme: "Assisting Student Veterans in Their Transition: Two Successful"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

Assisting Student Veterans in Their Transition: Two Successful

Programs

Shad

Satterthwaite

, University of Oklahoma

Slide2

Assessment: What We KnowSince August 1, 2009:More than $40 billion spent on educational benefits by the VA.

Over one million veterans and their family members have received VA educational benefits.Nearly 1,800 colleges and universities participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program.Most states offer some type of educational benefit to military members.What we don’t know.

Source: Office of Public and Intergovernmental Affairs, “VA Celebrates 70

th

Anniversary of the Original “GI Bill,’” June 23, 2014, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs.

Slide3

Student Veterans Association DataAccording to a 2014 study, 48.3% of student veterans do not complete a postsecondary degree.35.8% of student veterans who obtain an associate degree went on to earn a bachelor’s degree.20.8% of student veterans who obtain a bachelor’s degree went on to earn a graduate degree.

Source: Student Veterans of America, “Million Records Project,” March 24, 2014.

Slide4

The NeedInstitutions of higher education that provide services geared toward student-veterans – 89%Percent of institutions that assist students in their transition from military life to college before the Post-9/11 GI Bill – 22%

Percent of institutions that assist students in their transition from military life to college after the Post-9/11 GI Bill – 37%Source: McBain, L., Kim, Y.M., Cook, B.J., & Snead, K.M. (2012),

From Soldier to student II: Assessing campus programs for veterans and service members.

Washington, DC: American Council on Education.

Slide5

Green Zone

Slide6

Green ZoneApril 2012 – OU Veteran Support Alliance

January 2013 – Over 100 faculty & staff involvedDecember 2013 – Live workshops (video taped)

August 2014 – 462 faculty & staff involved

Spring 2015 – Second phase of training with workshops & guest speakers

Slide7

Top Ten Green Zone TipsRealize veterans are nontraditional students, a special population of financially independent adults often juggling family, work, and studies. 

Be aware that not all the veterans in your classroom are male. More women are serving, and are almost as likely as their male counterparts to have experienced firsthand traumas of war. One in four veteran students are women. (Newbold & Balmer, 2012)Veterans generally possess discipline, structure, and a strong work ethic. Remember that the military teaches team connection and completion skills. 

Slide8

Top Ten Green Zone TipsWith some awareness and sensitivity on the instructor’s part, veteran life experiences become assets, adding to the diversity of perspectives represented in classrooms. These life experiences can help both veterans and nonveterans gain a broader, more nuanced perspective on the world or class subject. (

Kreuter, 2012)Be aware that not all the veterans in your classroom are male. More women are serving, and are almost as likely as their male

counterparts to have experienced firsthand traumas of war. One

in four veteran students are women. (

Newbold

&

Balmer

, 2012)

Veterans

view the instructor as the leader of the classroom and

typically

respect decisiveness. Treat veterans as adults, as this is

what

they expect. Instructors should have effective classroom

management

policies in place. (

Newbold

&

Balmer

, 2012)

.

 

Slide9

Top Ten Green Zone TipsVeterans may be reluctant to talk about their military experiences. Conversely, some may inadvertently dominate class discussions, in which cases boundaries for the nature and quantity of class participation need to be set, preferably in private, without calling the student out in front of the class.  Don’t try to relate to experiences that you don’t share – if you haven’t been in combat, don’t pretend that you understand what it or its aftermath is like. (

Kreuter, 2012)Keep the syllabus (mission) clear with specific tasks and dates.  Be available for assistance and added support or referral.  Veterans may not easily admit when they are struggling. (Grasgreen,

2013)

Slide10

Top Ten Green Zone Tips9. Understand that not everything in these Top Ten tips applies to

every veteran.  They are all unique individuals with unique needs, and we do not want to engage in false assumptions about veterans.One

example of how you can help is to use the resources provided

on

this page to refer veteran student to services on campus.  It is

helpful

to confirm that you are referring correctly by making a

phone

call before sending the student to the referral source.

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“The biggest challenge I’ve faced with regards to my PTSD here on campus is anxiety. Especially with regards to taking tests.As a medic in the Army high pressure situations often had very real life and death outcomes. Sometimes, the pressure surrounding tests and finals week can become overwhelming and have caused me to under perform on some final exams.

It actually took me some time to figure out what was going on. One of the things that helped me get back on track was the Disability Resource Center. When I went to them they knew exactly what resources I would need to continue to be an effective student”Kenneth Meador, OU Student and 2013 Truman Scholar

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WSP 2015 ScheduleVassar College (January 2015)Yale University (May-

-‐June 2015)Harvard University (June 2015)University of Michigan (June

2015

)

University

of

North

Carolina–Chapel

Hill

(June

2015

)

Syracuse University(July

2015

)

Cornell

University

(July

2015

)

Georgetown

University

(July-

-‐

August 2015

)

University

of

Oklahoma

(August

2015

)

University

of Chicago

(August-

-‐

September 2015

)

University

of

Southern

California

(August

2015

)

Slide15

Preliminary Data100% of veterans who completed the Warrior-Scholar Project and started college have stayed in college.88% of respondents indicated a higher level of confidence in the post-course survey than they did in their pre-course survey.100% of respondents would "definitely recommend" the Warrior-Scholar Project to other veterans.