Preparing Students for the New English Regents Exam, 2016

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Presenter: Amy Benjamin for BOCES: Nassau, Western Suffolk. Eastern Suffolk . www.amybenjamin.com. R. At-A-Glance: 32 Common Core Anchor Standards for Literacy (grades 3-12). . Reading:. Writing: . ID: 711287 Download Presentation

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Preparing Students for the New English Regents Exam, 2016




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Presentations text content in Preparing Students for the New English Regents Exam, 2016

Slide1

Preparing Students for the New English Regents Exam, 2016

Presenter: Amy Benjamin for BOCES: Nassau, Western Suffolk

Eastern Suffolk www.amybenjamin.com

R

Slide2

At-A-Glance: 32 Common Core Anchor Standards for Literacy (grades 3-12)

Reading:

Writing:

Speaking/Listening

Language

Key Ideas & Details:

Read closely.

Track themes

& summarize main

ideas.

3. Understand and

follow progressions.

Craft and Structure:

4. Know what words &

phrases mean in context.

Analyze the structure of

the text (how the author

decided to arrange the story

or information)

6. Assess how point of view or purpose affectsmeaning.

Integration of Knowledge & Ideas :

7. Understandcharts, graphs,and other numericalrepresentations.8. Judge the validityof an argument, basedon the language used.9. Compare texts onthe same subject.

10 Comprehend complex textindependently.

Types & Purposes:

Write arguments.Write informative/explanatory texts3. Write narratives.

4.Match your style to theexpectations of youraudience.5. Use the writing process 6. Use technology as acollaborative tool.

7. Conduct short as wellas more sustained researchprojects.8. Gather information frommultiple sources. Judge thecredibility of the sources.9. Use both literary andinformational texts to support,inform, and enrich your claims

Production & Distribution:

Research:

10. Write routinely; bothformally and informally; writepolished pieces and on-demand;write to express knowledge andto formulate it. Revise, proofread,edit.

Comprehension &Collaboration:

1.Develop socially appropriate conversationalskills.2. Verbally summarizeinformation that you’veheard, read, or seen.3. Assess the credibilityof what you read and hear,based on the languageused.

4. Present meaningful ideasand information coherentlyand courteously.5. Enhance formal presentations with visuals,including digital media.6. Know the rules of formalspoken English and apply them when appropriate to theaudience.

Presentation of Ideasand Knowledge:

:

Knowledge of Language:

Know the rules offormal standard writtenand spoken English andapply them when your audience expects you to doso. Accurately perceive thecircumstances when youraudience expects you to usea formal language tone.2. The above includes thevisuals of writing: spelling,capitalization, punctuation.3. Understand that languageis a changing social contract.Make effective choices. Expand your understanding ofthe language choices of others.

4. Figure out what new words& phrases mean using context,word parts, dictionaries, a5. Understand that words canbe nuanced and can havemultiple meanings.6. Understand and use anacademic/businesslike levelof language.

VocabularyAcquisition and Use:

Amy Benjamin Educational Services, Inc.

Slide3

At-A-Glance: 32 Common Core Anchor Standards for Literacy (grades 3-12)

Reading:

Writing:

Speaking/Listening

Language

Key Ideas & Details:

Read closely.

Track themes

& summarize main

ideas.

3. Understand and

follow progressions.

Craft and Structure:

4. Know what words &

phrases mean in context.

Analyze the structure of

the text (how the author

decided to arrange the story

or information)

6. Assess how point of

view or purpose affectsmeaning.

Integration of Knowledge & Ideas : 7. Understandcharts, graphs,and other numericalrepresentations.

8. Judge the validityof an argument, basedon the language used.9. Compare texts onthe same subject.

10 Comprehend complex text

independently.Types & Purposes:

Write arguments.Write informative/explanatory texts3. Write narratives.4.Match your style to the

expectations of youraudience.5. Use the writing process 6. Use technology as acollaborative tool.7. Conduct short as wellas more sustained researchprojects.8. Gather information frommultiple sources. Judge the

credibility of the sources.9. Use both literary andinformational texts to support,

inform, and enrich your claims

Production & Distribution: Research: 10. Write routinely; both

formally and informally; writepolished pieces and on-demand;write to express knowledge andto formulate it. Revise, proofread,edit.

Comprehension &Collaboration: 1.Develop socially appropriate conversationalskills.2. Verbally summarizeinformation that you’ve

heard, read, or seen.3. Assess the credibilityof what you read and hear,based on the languageused.4. Present meaningful ideasand information coherentlyand courteously.5. Enhance formal presentations with visuals,

including digital media.6. Know the rules of formalspoken English and apply them when appropriate to theaudience.

Presentation of Ideas

and Knowledge:

: Knowledge of Language: Know the rules offormal standard writtenand spoken English andapply them when your audience expects you to doso. Accurately perceive thecircumstances when youraudience expects you to usea formal language tone.2. The above includes thevisuals of writing: spelling,capitalization, punctuation.3. Understand that language

is a changing social contract.Make effective choices. Expand your understanding ofthe language choices of others.4. Figure out what new words& phrases mean using context,word parts, dictionaries, a

5. Understand that words canbe nuanced and can havemultiple meanings.6. Understand and use an

academic/businesslike level

of language.

Vocabulary

Acquisition and Use:

Amy Benjamin Educational Services, Inc.

Slide4

Text Complexity Measures for 11

th Grade

Lexile

ATOS

Degrees of

Reading

Power

Flesch-

Kincaid

Source

Rater

Pearson

Rdg

Maturity

Metric

1185-1385

11.20-

14.10

67-74

1034-

14.20

12.30-

14.50

9.57-12.00

Slide5

Test Blueprint

Test Part

SuggestedTime

Standards

Addressed

TextDescription

Student

Task

Part 1:

Rdg Comp

60 minutes

RL 1-6

RI 1-6; 8-10

L 3-5

3 texts:

1 literature,

1 poem,

1information

up to 2,600 words,

total

24 multiplechoice

Part II:ArgumentationWriting fromSources

90 minutesRL 1-10W 1,4,9L 1-64 information-based texts,

probably inc.graphicsup to 2,600 words,

totalWrite an

argumentativeessay, referringto the sourcesgivenPart III:Text Analysis

30 minutesRL 1-6,10RI 1-6,10W. 2,4,9L 1-6

1 text, up to1,000 wordsliterary orinformationWrite essay: Identify central idea and analyze how the author uses one writing strategy (lit.element or technique;rhetorical strategy)

Slide6

Weights

Part

Max RawScore Pts.

Weighting

Factor

Max Wght.Score Pts

1

24

1

24

2

6

4

24

3

4

2

8

Total

56

A student’s total points will then be plotted on a matrix to determine the score

out of 100%. As in the past, the matrix will vary from exam to exam.

Slide7

Sample Scores

(based on the January 2016 Conversion Chart)

Elizabeth:

Part I: 12 x 1 = 12

Part II: 3 x 4 = 12Part III: 2 x 2 = 4

Raw Score: 28Score: 63

Zachary:

Part I: 13 x 1 = 13

Part II: 5 x 4 = 20

Part III: 3 x 2 = 6

Raw Score: 39

Score: 84

James:

Part I: 10 x 1 = 10

Part II: 3 x 4 = 12

Part III: 3 x 2 = 6

Raw Score: 28

Score: 63

Slide8

A Detailed Look at the Three Parts

of the

New English Regents Exam

Slide9

“The ear is the only true writer and the only true reader. I’ve knownpeople who could read without hearing the sentence sounds and theywere the fastest readers. Eye readers we call them. They get the

meaning by glances. But they are bad readers because they miss the best part of what a good writer puts into his work.” -Robert Frost

Slide10

Test Blueprint

Test Part

SuggestedTime

Standards

Addressed

TextDescription

Student

Task

Part 1:

Rdg Comp

60 minutes

Reading Standards

1-6

3 texts:

1 literature,

1 poem,

1 information

up to 2,600 words,

total

24 multiple

choice

Slide11

Passage A: Look over the questions, note the lines in the text: 2 minutes

Reading Time: approx 6 minutes (approx. 1,000 words)

Write a quick main idea sentence: 1 minute Multiple Choice time: 13 minutes (10 questions)22

Passage B: Look over the questions, note the lines in the text: 2 minutes Reading Time: approx 2 minutes (approx 100 words)

Write a quick main idea sentence: 1 minute Multiple Choice time: 5 minutes (4 questions)

10Passage C: Look over the questions, note the lines in the text: 2 minutes

Reading time: approx. 6 minutes (approx. 1,000 words) Write a quick main idea sentence: 1 minute

Multiple Choice time: 13 minutes (6 questions)

22

Est. 54 minutes for Part 1, 24 questions

(6 minutes to spare)

Revised: (Please adjust your handout)

Slide12

2016

Slide13

2016

Passage A: Fiction

4

31

231

134

Reading Standard 5

Reading Standard 3

Reading Standard 3

Reading Standard 3

Reading Standard 5

Reading Standard 2

Reading Standard 2

Reading Standard 3

Reading Standard 2

Slide14

2016

Passage B: Poem

10. 411. 1

12. 213. 314. 1

Reading Standard 2

Reading Standard 5Reading Standard 4Language Standard 5Reading Standard 5

Slide15

2016

Passage A: Fiction

15. 116. 4

17. 218. 119. 220. 121. 422. 4

23. 224. 1

Reading Standard 4Reading Standard 3Reading Standard 2Reading Standard 6Reading Standard 4

Reading Standard 4Reading Standard 3Reading Standard 4Reading Standard 5Reading Standard 2

Slide16

Review of Passage Selections from Past CC Regents Exams:

June 2014; August 2014; January 2015; June 2015; August 2015;

January 2016:

Pre- or Early 20C-style:

Reading Comp: Text Analysis: Arthur Conan Doyle Bram StokerChief of the Seneca Nation Henry David Thoreau

Anton Chekhov Mark TwainEdith Wharton Anna Howard Shaw Patrick Henry Jonathan Swift

Slide17

Slide18

Sorting the Trees in the Forest by Name

Slide19

The Spider

With six small diamonds for his eyes

He walks upon the summer skies,Drawing from his silken blouse

The lacework of his dwelling house.

He lays his staircase as he goes

Under his eight thoughtful toesAnd grows with the concentric flowerOf his shadowless, thin bower.

His back legs are a pair of hands

They can spindle out the strands

Of a thread that is so small

It stops the sunlight not at all.

He spins himself to threads of dew

Which will harden soon into

Lines that cut like slender knives

Across the insects’ airy lives.

He makes no motion but is right,

He spreads out his appetite

Into a network, twist on twist,

This little ancient scientist.

He does not know he is unkind,

He has a jewel for a mind.And logic deadly as dry bone,This small son of Euclid’s own.

1.1. Euclid: An ancient Greek (300 B.C.) scientist and mathematician who is credited with inventing the study of geometry.

Slide20

Slide21

Preparing Students for the New English Regents Exam, 2016

Presenter: Amy Benjamin for BOCES: Nassau, Western Suffolk

Eastern Suffolk www.amybenjamin.com

R

Slide22

Slide23

from the Anchor Papers:

Citation tendencies: (As written, January 2016) LEVEL 6

An original benefit of GMOs was to create a crop, such as corn or

soybeans, that was capable of producing its own pesticide (Text 1, lines 2-4).

However, according to a 2009 report, “overall pesticide use dramatically

increased…after GM crops were introduced” (Text 2, lines 30-32). Moreover,

a vicious and potentially deadly cycle has been produced: GM crops arecreated that are resistant to even more volatile and dangerous pesticides,

including one that mimics Agent Orange (Text 2, lines 36-37).

Slide24

from the Anchor Papers:

Citation tendencies: (As written, January 2016) LEVEL 4:

People who promote it, mentioned in text 1 and in text 3 argue mostly

that the benefits outweigh the little, if nonresistant risks. A major benefit is its

usefullness in combating world hunger. In text 1, lines 12-134 it states, “Some

GMO supporters say that both applications are necessary to help feed a

growing population especially in poor countries where famine and drought are common.” Although there is some doubt, this seems like a logical solution to

an underproduction problem. Also, the risk of the food itself has been

reviewed by major organisations like the FDA and the WHO. In text 3, lines 3-4,

it is explained, “The FDA generally recognized these foods as safe, and

the World Health Org. has said no ill effects have resulted or the international

market.”

Slide25

from the Anchor Papers:

Citation tendencies: (As written, January 2016) LEVEL 3:

In Text 1 lines 41-42, a negative stated about GM produce is that

eventually insects could become resistant to the insecticides. If we

continue to use similar methods of getting rid of insects they will

eventually become immune to all forms of repellents. Then as a direct

result crops and produce would fail. Another negative is a human related problem with gmos. GMOS have

not been studied enough for it to be ascertained that they pose no health

risk. In Text 3 lines 6-7 medical professionals worry that the consumption of

gmo modified foods may lead to people being prone to anti-biotic resistant

illnesses, or allergies. In animal trials in text 2 lines, 21-234, serious gm

related problems, accelerated aging, disrupt of insulin and cholesterol

regulation, gastro intestinal issues and changes in organs.

Slide26

from the Anchor Papers:

Citation tendencies: (As written, January 2016) LEVEL 2:

The use of these genetic supplements or sprays are not nessicarly bad.

If there being used then our crops are staying fresh and keeps bugs out

and away from the crops. Farmers will sell more product because more will

be fresh. In text 3, lines 1-2 states that the spray is fine for human

consumption. In text 1 it states that animals have it in their food as well.This is not causing any harm to humans or animals so why not use it.

On the opposing side it has bacterias and viruses inside of it that can

make people or animals sick. The supplement should be changed to be

safer and not cause such harm / sickness to humans and animals.

(Note:

This is the entire response.)

Slide27

Implicit

Explicit

Slide28

Tier 3:

glossary word:

Multisyllabic Specific to a subject area Latin or Greek-based

topography, photosynthesis, cartography

extrude, metamorphose, striate sedimentary, organic, leeward

Tier 2:

Words of

education, business,

government, religion

:

Components: Prefix, root, suffix

Latin-based

elevation, formation, protrusion, expanse…

elevate, formulate, isolate, develop…

remote, irregular, precipitous

Tier 1:

Basic conversational words: Friends & family 1 or 2 syllables Learned naturally, through exposure

hills, grass, rocks, land, sky, clouds,…grow, fly, climb, …green, high, rocky, grassy Different kinds of vocabulary.

FYI: Most common 1,000 words

account for 70% of words used in English.

Slide29

How many new words can you learn

in one class period?

Slide30

Tier 3:

glossary word:

Multisyllabic Specific to a subject area Latin or Greek-based

topography, photosynthesis, cartography

extrude, metamorphose, striate sedimentary, organic, leeward

Tier 2:

Words of

education, business,

government, religion

:

Components: Prefix, root, suffix

Latin-based

elevation, formation, protrusion, expanse…

elevate, formulate, isolate, develop…

remote, irregular, precipitous

Tier 1:

Basic conversational words: Friends & family 1 or 2 syllables Learned naturally, through exposure

hills, grass, rocks, land, sky, clouds,…grow, fly, climb, …green, high, rocky, grassy Different kinds of vocabulary.

FYI: Most common 1,000 words

account for 70% of words used in English.

Slide31

The Academic Word List (AWL):

Background:

The Academic Word List consists of 570 word families that are not in the most frequent 2,000 words of English but which occur frequently over a very wide range of academic texts.These 570 word families are grouped into ten subsets that reflect word frequency. A word like analyze falls into Subset 1, which contains the most frequent words, while the word

adjacent falls into Subset 10 which includes the least frequent (among this list of high incidence words).

The AWL is not restricted to a specific field of study. That means that the words are useful for learners

studying in disciplines as varied as literature, science, health, business, and law. This high-utility academic word list does not contain technical words likely to appear in one,specific field of study such as amortization, petroglyph, onomatopoeia, or

cartilage. Two-thirds of all academic English derive from Latin or Greek.

Understandably, knowledge of the most high-incidence academic words in English can significantly

boost a student’s comprehension level of school-based reading material. Students who are taught

these high-utility academic words and routinely placed in contexts requiring their usage are likely

to be able to master academic material with more confidence and efficiency, wasting less time and

energy in guessing words or consulting dictionaries than those who are only equipped with the most

basic 2000-3000 words that characterize ordinary conversation.

The following link gives you a two-page version of the list:

http://www.doe.in.gov/TitleI/pdf/Word_List_Feldman.pdf

Source: Coxhead, Averil. (2000). A new academic word list. TESOL Quarterly, 34, 213-238.

Slide32

Academic Word List: Subset 1

analyze approach area assess assume authority available benefit

concept consist context constitute contract data define derive distribute economy environment establish estimate evident factor finance formula function income indicate individual interpret involve issue labor legal legislate major method percent period principle proceed process policy require research respond role section sector

significant similar source specific structure theory vary

analizar, el area, asumir, la autoridad, el beneficio/beneficiar, concepto,

consistar, contexto,constituir, datos, definir, derivar, distribuir, la economía,

establecer, estimar/estimado, evidente, la funcion, las finanzas, la formula,

el indice, el individuo, interpretar, envolver, laborar, legal, legislar, el metodo,

occurrir, el por ciento, el periodo, principio, proceder,el proceso, requerir,

responder, la seccion, sector, significativo/significante, especifico, a estructura,

la teoria, variar

Spanish cognates:

Slide33

US History and Government Regents Exam

January, 2016

18. Few restrictions were placed on immigrationto the United States in the late 19th centuryprimarily because immigrants

would work for low wages

(2) provided a rich source of investment capital

(3) would add to the diversity of the population(4) faced little opposition from citizens

source: subset 1

diverse: subset 6

restrict: subset 2

immigrate: subset 3

primary: subset 2

Slide34

Living Environment RegentsExam

January, 2016

18. Some plants increase in height due to changesin specialized regions of cells in the tips of theirbranches. The processes that result in thesechanges include

region: subset 2

differentiate: subset 7

process: subset 1

meiosis, cell growth, and cloning

mitosis, zygote formation, and cloning

meiosis, gamete formation, and differentiation

mitosis, cell growth, and differentiation

Slide35

Algebra I RegentsExam

January, 2016

18. Which recursively defined function representsthe sequence 3,7,15, 31…?

define: subset 1

function: subset 1sequence: subset 3

f(1) = 3,

f(n + 1) = 2 + 3

f(n)

(2)

f

(1) = 3,

f(n

+1) = 2 — 1

f(n)

(3) f(1) = 3, f(n + 1) = 2f(n) +1

(4) f(1) = 3, f(n + 1) —2

Slide36

English Language Arts RegentsExam

January, 2016

18. The rhetorical question posed in line 26emphasizes the

pose: subset 10

establish: subset 1issue: subset 1

establish: subset 1eliminate: subset 7

unavoidable nature of the problem

(2) important issue of national sovereignty

(3) likely elimination of weapons of mass destruction

(4) probable establishment of an new world power

Slide37

Physical Setting/Chemistry RegentsExam

January, 2016

18. A reaction will most likely occur if the collidingparticles have the proper

volume: subset 3

occur: subset 1energy: subset 5

orient: subset 5

mass, only

(2) mass and volume

(3) orientation, only

(4) orientation and energy

Slide38

(Taking a little break from the list)

10% of the nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in academic textbooks and tests

are on this list.4.5% of the nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in newspapers are on this list.

1.4% of the nouns, verbs, adjectives, and adverbs in fiction and poetry are on

this list.

80% of the words derive from Latin and Greek word components.

Slide39

Vocabulary-Content-Sentence (VCS)Daily Practice:

Write a sentence about something we are learning this week, employing

one of these words. You may change the form of the words to fit yoursentence. Your sentence must be at least 8 words long.(from Subset 3): proportion imply layer link

justify ensure outcome

Integrating the AWL

Slide40

About 80% of the food on grocery-store shelves

already contains at least some ingredients made

from altered genes. This means that almost anyprocessed food, from salad dressing to snackcrackers, could contain GMOs, unless it has beencertified organic (federal regulations explicitlyrestrict food manufacturers from using the

organic seal on products made with GMOs). That’s

because corn, soy, and canola are the top three BMfood crops in the United States, so anything that is

produced with corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup,or soybean or corn oil might include GMOs.

Very little fresh produce on the market, though,

is genetically engineered, with the exceptions of

most papaya, some squash, and a few strains of

sweet corn. Meanwhile, we’re not the only ones

consuming GMOs—animals do, too. GM corn and

soybeans are often used in livestock feed, though

there’s no evidence that GMOs show up on your

steak or chops.

Text 1

Avoiding GMOs is not so easy and

may involve making some dramatic changes

in how you purchase and prepare food.

“About 80% of the food on grocery-store

shelves already contains at least some

ingredients made from altered genes” (Text 1,lines 1-3). Essay

Slide41

About 80% of the food on grocery-store shelves

already contains at least some ingredients made

from altered genes. This means that almost anyprocessed food, from salad dressing to snackcrackers, could contain GMOs, unless it has been

certified organic (federal regulations explicitlyrestrict food manufacturers from using the

organic seal on products made with GMOs). That’s

because corn, soy, and canola are the top three BMfood crops in the United States, so anything that isproduced with corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup,

or soybean or corn oil might include GMOs.

Very little fresh produce on the market, though,

is genetically engineered, with the exceptions of

most papaya, some squash, and a few strains of

sweet corn. Meanwhile, we’re not the only ones

consuming GMOs—animals do, too. GM corn and

soybeans are often used in livestock feed, though

there’s no evidence that GMOs show up on your

steak or chops.

Text 1

Essay

Avoiding GMOs is not so easy and

may involve making some dramatic changes

in how you purchase food. You’ll want to

steer clear of almost anything in a sealed jar,bottle, bag, or box.“About 80% of the food on grocery-store shelves already contains

at least some ingredients made from altered genes” (Text 1,lines 1-3).

Direct Quote:

Slide42

About 80% of the food on grocery-store shelves

already contains at least some ingredients made

from altered genes. This means that almost anyprocessed food, from salad dressing to snack(5) crackers, could contain GMOs, unless it has beencertified organic (federal regulations explicitly

restrict food manufacturers from using the

organic seal on products made with GMOs). That’s

because corn, soy, and canola are the top three GM(10) food crops in the United States, so anything that is

produced with corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup,

or soybean or corn oil might include GMOs.

Very little fresh produce on the market, though,

is genetically engineered, with the exceptions of

(15) most papaya, some squash, and a few strains of

sweet corn. Meanwhile, we’re not the only ones

consuming GMOs—animals do, too. GM corn and

soybeans are often used in livestock feed, though

there’s no evidence that GMOs show up on your

(20) steak or chops.

Text 1

Avoiding GMOs is not so easy and

may involve making some dramatic changes

in how you purchase food. You’ll want to

steer clear of almost anything in a sealed jar,bottle, bag, or box.“About 80% of the food on grocery-store shelves already contains at least some ingredients made from altered genes” (Text 1,lines 1-3). Because

corn, soy, and canola are the biggest GM food crops in America, anything containing

corn syrup, soybean or corn oil is suspect (Text 1, lines 10-13).EssayParaphrase

Slide43

About 80% of the food on grocery-store shelves

already contains at least some ingredients made

from altered genes. This means that almost anyprocessed food, from salad dressing to snack(5) crackers, could contain GMOs, unless it has beencertified organic (federal regulations explicitly

restrict food manufacturers from using the

organic seal on products made with GMOs). That’s

because corn, soy, and canola are the top three GM(10) food crops in the United States, so anything that isproduced with corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup,

or soybean or corn oil might include GMOs.

Very little fresh produce on the market, though,

is genetically engineered, with the exceptions of

(15)

most papaya, some squash, and a few strains of

sweet corn.

Meanwhile, we’re not the only ones

consuming GMOs—animals do, too. GM corn and

soybeans are often used in livestock feed, though

there’s no evidence that GMOs show up on your

(20) steak or chops.

Text 1

Avoiding GMOs is not so easy andmay involve making some dramatic changesin how you purchase food. You’ll want to steer clear of almost anything in a sealed jar,bottle, bag, or box.“About 80% of the food on grocery-store shelves already contains

at least some ingredients made from altered genes” (Text 1,lines 1-3). Because corn, soy, and canola are the biggest GM

food crops in America, anything containing corn syrup, soybean or corn oil is suspect (Text 1, lines 10-13).Essay The produce aisle is, for the most

part, a non-GMO zone, as long as you stay away from “…most papaya, some

squash, and a few strains of sweet corn” (Text 1, lines 15-16).

Quotes needing ellipsis(words in the sentence left out)

Slide44

About 80% of the food on grocery-store shelves

already contains at least some ingredients made

from altered genes. This means that almost anyprocessed food, from salad dressing to snack(5) crackers, could contain GMOs, unless it has beencertified organic (federal regulations explicitly

restrict food manufacturers from using the

organic seal on products made with GMOs). That’s

because corn, soy, and canola are the top three GM(10) food crops in the United States, so anything that isproduced with corn syrup, high-fructose corn syrup,

or soybean or corn oil might include GMOs.

Very little fresh produce on the market, though,

is genetically engineered, with the exceptions of

(15)

most papaya, some squash, and a few strains of

sweet corn.

Meanwhile, we’re not the only ones

consuming GMOs—animals do, too. GM corn and

soybeans are often used in livestock feed,

though

there’s no evidence that GMOs

show up on your(20) steak or chops.

Text 1 Avoiding GMOs is not so easy andmay involve making some dramatic changesin how you purchase food. You’ll want to steer clear of almost anything in a sealed jar,bottle, bag, or box.“About 80% of the food

on grocery-store shelves already contains at least some ingredients made from altered genes” (Text 1,lines 1-3). Because

corn, soy, and canola are the biggest GM food crops in America, anything containing corn syrup, soybean or corn oil is suspect (Text 1, lines 10-13).Essay

The produce aisle is, for the mostpart, a non-GMO zone. Even thoughlivestock animals eat GMO corn, etc.,

“…there’s no evidence that GMOs…” (Text 1, lines 17-20)make their way into your turkey burger.

Quotes needing ellipsis(words in the sentence left out)

Slide45

Slide46

Test Blueprint

Test Part

SuggestedTime

Standards

Addressed

TextDescription

Student

Task

Part II:

Argumentation

Writing from

Sources

8

0 minutes

RL 1-10

W 1,4,9

L 1-6

4 information-

based texts,

probably inc.

graphicsup to 2,600 words, totalWrite anargumentativeessay, referringto the sourcesgiven

Reading time:

Text 1: 3 minutes Text 2: 3 minutes Text 3: 4 ½ minutes Text 4: 2 minutes Text 5: 5 minutesTotal: 18 minutes Writing Time: 3 minutes: Read the Directions 5 minutes: Written plan

50 minutes: Write the essayTotal: Approx. 80 minutes

(Combined with the 6 minutes left overfrom Part 1, I now have 16 extra minutes.)

Slide47

Note: These are overlapping:

Democratic Principles: Personal freedom, expression of individuality,

promotion of democracy, the right to be left alone, civil liberties, honoring the pastSense of Community: Helping others, sharing resources,

considering future generations; establishing sense of belonging; caring for loved ones

Desire for safety and security: Protection against enemies, protection of resources,

having sufficient food and shelter, avoiding and responding to natural disaster, maintaining healthEconomics: Maintaining sufficient resources for now and the future,

protecting personal fortunes while offering opportunities to everyone

Beauty, Pleasure, Convenience; Fairness

Foundational Values

Slide48

Background to the Issue (Introduction)

Acknowledgement of the opposing side (

Counterclaim)Quotations and paraphrases (references to authority)Examples

Anecdotes (little stories)

Comparisons

A combination of objective (academic) and subjective (emotional) languageIf…then statements Working definitions

Rhetorical questions

Statistics

Summaries

Cause and effect statements

Variety of perspectives (I, we, you, he, she, they)

Slide49

Sentence Frames:

Scaffolding the Writing Task for

Special Education Students, English Language Learners, and Everyone Else

Slide50

To write, you need three things:

Something to Say

The Words to Say It

Sentences to Hold

the Words

Slide51

Why scaffold a writing task with a sentence frame?

Provides models

Focuses the writer on content: “training wheels”

Allows the writer to be clear and concise

Is appropriate differentiation: Frames can be offered in increasing levels of

language complexity

Forms a mental template that will grow into the writer’s technique

Gives reluctant writers access to acceptable forms

Slide52

A good argument is a response

to opposition:

Slide53

Use this frames at the outset of your argument to introduce an ongoing

debate:

In discussions of _____________, one controversial issue has been___________________________. People who believe____________claim that________________________________. On the other hand,

those who believe _____________________________ assert that

______________________________________________________.

My own view is __________________________________________.

Should NYS prisons offer college courses?

Slide54

Use this frame to establish common ground on a controversial issue:

When it comes to the topic of ______________________, most of us

would agree that ____________________________. Where this agreement ends, however, is on the question of _____________________.

Whereas some are convinced that _______________________________.

others maintain that___________________________________________.

My own view is that____________________________________________.

Question: Should the smoking age be raised to 21?

Slide55

Use these frames as you acknowledge that the opposing side has a certain

degree to validity:

While at one time it may have been true that__________________,we can now state that____________________________________.

___________________ makes sense when he/she/they say________

________________, but _____________________________________.

Despite the validity of ______________________’s claim about ____________,

he/she/they miss the mark when it comes to________________________

because___________________________________________________.

Should the NYS curriculum require students to learn Spanish, beginning in K?

Slide56

Use these frames to establish working definitions of key terms:

For the purpose of this discussion, I will define _______________________

as __________________________________________________________.

Although you might think of ______________________as being just

another_________________________, I define it as_______________________

_________________________________________________________________.

Should physical education classes in NYS be required to include yearly

units in ballroom dancing?

Slide57

Use these frames to establish or deny a comparison:

_______________________ is like ___________________________.

They both _______________________________________________.

__________________________(s) may say that ___________________

is like _______________________________, but the comparison is

false because while _________________________________________is______________________________, it is not as ________________

as they claim.

Is this rule fair and reasonable for students and school personnel?

Slide58

Use these frames to establish the importance of this topic:

______________ is important because__________________.

We should care about______________because if_____________,

then_________________________.

Ultimately, what is at stake here is____________________________.

My discussion of _________________ addresses the

larger matter of _____________________.

Should students be permitted to keep their cell phones on in class?

Slide59

Sentence Frames for Argumentation

Use these noun phrases to negatively characterize your opponents:

Use these noun phrases to positively characterize your supporters:

progressive thinkers prudent thinkers

those who think about proactive people

those who care about civic-minded peoplethose who know about serious peoplethose who understand people with regard for

optimists realists

those who disregard those who take a narrow view

pessimists people who live in the past

naysayers people who are unaware

those who would have us believe those on the sidelines

those who live only for the moment

hardliners

Slide60

…a framework for preparing students for college-level academic thinking,

reading, and writing.

https://learn.thinkcerca.com/home

Contact: eileen@thinkcerca.com

Slide61

“I know what it is, but I don’t know how to say it.”

“I have the

content. I don’t have the form.”

Slide62

Claim

Evidence

Reasons (for the relevance of the evidence)

Counterargument(pre-empting opposing arguments)

AudienceAppropriateness

Slide63

…a framework for preparing students for college-level academic thinking,

reading, and writing.

https://learn.thinkcerca.com/home

C: Claim:

What are you trying to prove inyour argument? What’s your

point?

aka:

thesis, thesis statement,

assertion, theory, hypothesis

Slide64

…a framework for preparing students for college-level academic thinking,

reading, and writing.

https://learn.thinkcerca.com/homeC: Claim: Write one sentence that

states your claim.

Slide65

…a framework for preparing students for college-level academic thinking,

reading, and writing.

https://learn.thinkcerca.com/home

E: Evidence:

What are your facts and figures? (You need to find evidence

from reputable sources, not just

your opinion)

Suggestion: Use quotes from the

text.

Slide66

…a framework for preparing students for college-level academic thinking,

reading, and writing.

https://learn.thinkcerca.com/home

E: Evidence:

Give 3 facts that are evidence supporting your claim (preferably taken from each of three of the texts).

1. Direct quotation 2. Paraphrase 3. Statistic

Slide67

…a framework for preparing students for college-level academic thinking,

reading, and writing.

https://learn.thinkcerca.com/home

R: Reasons

How does your evidence prove

your claim?

Suggested connective words:

because, therefore, this is why

,

so

etc.

Slide68

…a framework for preparing students for college-level academic thinking,

reading, and writing.

https://learn.thinkcerca.com/homeR: Reasons

Show that you understand what it

means to connect the evidence to

your claim (by writing a sentence that does so).

Slide69

…a framework for preparing students for college-level academic thinking,

reading, and writing.

https://learn.thinkcerca.com/home

Counterargument:

What is at least one alternative point of view?

Why do you think this point of view isnot as strong as yours? Suggested connective words: Although,

despite, even though, while others might say, I’ve

heard that…but…

Slide70

…a framework for preparing students for college-level academic thinking,

reading, and writing.

https://learn.thinkcerca.com/homeCounterargument:

Write two sentences that

acknowledge and thenpre-empt your opposition.

Slide71

…a framework for preparing students for college-level academic thinking,

reading, and writing.

https://learn.thinkcerca.com/home

Audience Appropriateness:

Are you using words andgrammar that your

audience will appreciate?

Slide72

5 Minute Plan

What is the question?

What is my viewpoint? (claim)

What is the counterclaim?

What valid points does the counterclaim have?

But why am I still right?

Why is this issue important?

What are my parting words of warning?

(If…then…)

Connectives: but, however

although, even though, nevertheless

therefore, so

Use your sentence frames.

Use your academic word list.

Slide73

Slide74

Test Blueprint:

Revisited

Test PartSuggestedTime

Standards

Addressed

TextDescription

Student

Task

Part III:

Text Analysis

4

0 minutes

(46 minutes)

RL 1-6,10

RI 1-6,10

W. 2,4,9

L 1-6

1 text, up to

1,000 words

literary

orinformationWrite essay: Identify central idea and analyze how the author uses one writing strategy (lit.element or technique;rhetorical strategy)

Writing Time: 1 minute: Read Directions 4 minutes: Written Plan 30 minutes: Write 3 paragraphs

Reading Time: 5 minutes

Slide75

Part III: Identify central idea and analyze how the author uses one writing strategy (lit. element or technique;

rhetorical strategy)

Literary Elements:(Necessarily present in all works of fiction) Narrative P.O.V.

CharacterSetting

PlotTheme

(also): Mood, tone, voice,dialogue/dialect…

Literary Techniques

(aka,

literary devices

)

Figurative language:

Metaphor

Simile

Extended metaphor

Repetition:

Parallel structure

Refrain

Motifs (repeated pattern)

SymbolismAllusionAlliterationRhythmRhymeFoil charactersIronyForeshadowing…

Rhetorical Strategies(speeches, essays)Appeals: Ethos (credibility) Logos (logic) Pathos (emotion)SarcasmHyperboleAllusionAnalogySyllogism (if…then)Propaganda: Bandwagon Testimonials

Straw man Ad hominem attack Glittering generalitiesAnecdotes…

Slide76

Go-To 1: Language use

(June 2014): T

he author uses language that describes government

to convey the central idea of women’s rights to vote.

(August 2014): The author uses language that describes

the Mississippi River to convey the central idea of the beauty of nature.

(January 2015): The author uses language that describes

the woods

to convey the central idea of

what if feels like to live in nature

.

(June 2015): The author uses language that describes

the human body

to convey the central idea of what if

feels like to

be physically limited.

(August 2015): The author uses language that describes

prisons

to convey the central idea of how it feels to be afraid and powerless.

(January 2016): The author uses language that describes physical hardships

to convey the central idea of how it feels to be alone in the wilderness.

Slide77

Repetition accomplishes three rhetorical purposes:

Emphasis

Unity Rhythm

Go-To: Repetition

Slide78

Go-To: Rhetorical Questions

Involve the reader/listener

Make the answer seem obvious

Stir emotion

Slide79

Go-To: Use of multi-sensory images

Puts the reader/listener in the moment

Is memorable

Is specific

Slide80

Go-To: Use of contrast

Is dramatic

Strengthens the author/speaker’s point

Attracts attention

Creates interesting variety

Makes differences stand out

Slide81

Go-To: Metaphor and Simile

Allows the reader/listener to relate

Clarifies author’s/speaker’s intent

Creates an image


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