Brown v. Board of Education

Brown v. Board of Education - Description

60. th. Anniversary . Post Civil . War - Racial Tensions . Still High. Voting rights were restricted through polling . taxes, . literacy . tests, and terrorism by the KKK and others.. Example of an actual . ID: 269106 Download Presentation

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Brown v. Board of Education

60. th. Anniversary . Post Civil . War - Racial Tensions . Still High. Voting rights were restricted through polling . taxes, . literacy . tests, and terrorism by the KKK and others.. Example of an actual .

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Brown v. Board of Education




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Presentation on theme: "Brown v. Board of Education"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

Brown v. Board of Education 60th Anniversary

Slide2

Post Civil War - Racial Tensions Still High

Voting rights were restricted through polling taxes, literacy tests, and terrorism by the KKK and others.Example of an actual  literacy test from Alabama

Slide3

Plessy v. Ferguson (1896)

On June 7, 1892, Homer Plessy, who was considered 1/8th African American, tried to sit in the all-white section of the train. He was arrested under the Separate Car Act.What do you think the Separate Car Act stands for?

Slide4

Plessy v. Ferguson (continued)

Separate services were provided according to race – this was known as separate but equal.

Slide5

Plessy v. Ferguson (continued)

Justice Harlan, dissented (disagreed with the Court’s decision): “Our Constitution is color-blind, and neither knows nor tolerates classes among citizens. In respect of civil rights, all citizens are equal before the law.”

Slide6

Jim Crow Laws

For the next 60 years after Plessy, segregation continued under what were called “Jim Crow” laws.The facilities for African-Americans were not as good as those for whites.

Slide7

Jim Crow Laws

African American students usually did not have enough books or equipment and were often grossly under-funded than schools for whites.

What differences do you notice between these classrooms?

Slide8

Brown v. Board of Education

The result of years of legal battles in school districts across the countryMotivated by the bravery of children,Their parents, and a determined team of lawyers.

Attorney

Thurgood

Marshall

Daisy Bates(Student)

Slide9

Brown v. Board of Education

Legal challenges to segregated public schools from four different states: Delaware, Kansas, South Carolina, and Virginia.Legal Argument: Separate can never be equal. Racial segregation violates the rights of equal protection, liberty, and the due process of law guaranteed by the Constitution.

Slide10

Brown v. Board of Education

The Court issued a unanimous decision in Brown declaring that segregated schools are unequal and violate the Constitution. The doctrine of “separate but equal” was officially over.A new round of battles was about to begin.HOW DO WE INTEGRATE OUR SCHOOLS?

Slide11

Class Discussion

What do you think the impact of the Brown v. Board of Education decision was?

How do you think the decision was received in communities?

What do you think it would have felt like to go to school during this time?

Slide12

Slide13

Post Brown v. Board of Education

Many see

Brown as a great achievement of American democracy and a

critical moment

in the Civil Rights Movement in the effort to make America a more fair and

equal society.

Other people, looking at continuing disparities in school funding, facilities,

and opportunity

, are frustrated with the lack of progress since Brown

.

What do YOU think?

Slide14

Slide15