“What If ‘They’ Call Me a Racist?” and - PowerPoint Presentation

“What If ‘They’ Call Me a Racist?” and
“What If ‘They’ Call Me a Racist?” and

“What If ‘They’ Call Me a Racist?” and - Description


Other DiscussionStopping Concerns Frances E Kendall PhD 2008 Frances E Kendall PhD 2 Strategies for Response As you prepare for your class spend time thinking about what your ID: 498013 Download Presentation

Tags

frances kendall response strategies kendall frances strategies response 2008 person race racist remember intent gender called fear color concerns behavior stopping

Download Section

Please download the presentation from below link :


Download Presentation - The PPT/PDF document "“What If ‘They’ Call Me a Racist?..." is the property of its rightful owner. Permission is granted to download and print the materials on this web site for personal, non-commercial use only, and to display it on your personal computer provided you do not modify the materials and that you retain all copyright notices contained in the materials. By downloading content from our website, you accept the terms of this agreement.

Embed / Share - “What If ‘They’ Call Me a Racist?” and


Presentation on theme: "“What If ‘They’ Call Me a Racist?” and"— Presentation transcript


Slide1

“What If ‘They’ Call Me a Racist?” and

Other Discussion-Stopping Concerns

Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D. Slide2

©

2008, Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D.

2

Strategies for Response

As you prepare for your class, spend time thinking about what your

real

fear is about being called a racist.

*

*

I am using race as a model. The same strategies apply to dealing with all areas of identity-based oppression.Slide3

©

2008, Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D.

3

Strategies for Response

Think through your fear to its natural conclusion (as opposed to your imagined one). What is the worst that could really happen? What would you do then?Slide4

©

2008, Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D.

4

Strategies for Response

Think about the impact that your color, gender, role and/or position have on how others hear what you say. Slide5

©

2008, Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D.

5

Strategies for Response

What weight do your words carry simply on the basis of who you are and what you look like? How does who you are grant you institutional privileges that others aren't granted?Slide6

©

2008, Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D.

6

Strategies for Response

Remember, it is not our

intent

that others are affected by; it is our

behavior

. So, even if our intent is good (from our perspective), the only thing others have to go on is our behavior.Slide7

©

2008, Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D.

7

Strategies for Response

Introduce issues of race (gender, heterosexism) yourself throughout the semester.Slide8

©

2008, Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D.

8

Strategies for Response

Acknowledge from the start ways that racism impacts all aspects of an institution.Slide9

©

2008, Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D.

9

Strategies for Response

If you are called a racist,

don't say

"I am not!" or "This has nothing to do with race." Both are conversation-stopping responses that lead to a power struggle rather than to genuine dialogue.Slide10

©

2008, Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D.

10

Strategies for Response

Another response to the person calling you a racist might be, "That is what I am here to learn about." What we need to know are the specific behaviors that are upsetting the person speaking to us. We also need for the person to know that we are taking her/his concerns seriously.Slide11

©

2008, Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D.

11

Strategies for Response

If you are a white person, telling a person of color when something does, or does not, have to do with race, can be experienced as:

silencing

arrogant

denying someone's experienceSlide12

©

2008, Frances E. Kendall, Ph.D.

12

Strategies for Response

Remember: Race is

always

a possible element in an interaction; it is not always

the

issue, but it is always a possibility and it needs to be held as such.

Shom More....