Are aboriginals second-class citizens in Canada? - PowerPoint Presentation

Are aboriginals second-class citizens in Canada?
Are aboriginals second-class citizens in Canada?

Are aboriginals second-class citizens in Canada? - Description


By Aly pylypchuk and Kaitland lovatt Thesis Aboriginals were definitely treated as secondclass citizens and only now are things becoming fair for them Some people would say theyre still treated as secondclass people ID: 746050 Download Presentation

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Presentation on theme: "Are aboriginals second-class citizens in Canada?"— Presentation transcript


Slide1

Are aboriginals second-class citizens in Canada?

By Aly pylypchuk and Kaitland

lovattSlide2

ThesisAboriginals were definitely treated as second-class citizens and only now are things becoming fair for them. Some people would say they’re still treated as second-class people.Slide3

1870’s-1990’s Residential SchoolsResidential schools openedOperated by Canadian government

Number of schools reached it’s peak in

early 1930’s

Last one closed I 1996 in SaskatchewanSlide4

Residential Schools

St. Michael’s Indian Residential School

Gordon Indian Residential SchoolSlide5

Primary Sources

October 21, 1996

July 24, 1935Slide6

1914 WWIWeren’t considered citizensExempt from conscription

Joined war anyway

Treatment remained the same upon return from the warSlide7

Primary SourcesSlide8

1939-1945 WWII At least 3000 first nations enlisted

Stripped of Indian status when they returned home

Many wanted to prove their loyalty

Contributed in many battlesSlide9

Primary SourcesSlide10

Indian Act 1876Principal statue through which federal government

administers Indian status

Has been amended several times

Guarantees certain rights and protections for First Nations

Only recognizes First Nations, not Metis or Inuit

Legal recognition of persons

F

irst

N

ations heritageRight to live on reserve landOutlawed potlatchSlide11

Primary SourcesSlide12

White paperFormally known as the “Statement of the Government of Canada on Indian Policy, 1969”

Pierre Trudeau against special treatment for aboriginals

Wanted to abolish previous legal

d

ocuments pertaining to indigenous peoples

Wanted to assimilate all “Indian” peoples under Canadian state

Policy proposed to eliminate Indian status

Backlash to 1969 White Paper was huge leading to withdrawal in 1970

Jean Chrétien and Pierre TrudeauSlide13

Primary SourcesSlide14

ConclusionIn conclusion aboriginals are definitely treated as second-class citizens in Canada, it’s gotten a lot better but there are still a few things that could

be amended.Slide15

Credits

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Wikipedia

. Wikimedia Foundation, 11 June 2017. Web. 13 June 2017. <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canadian_Indian_residential_school_system

>.

Perkel

, Colin. "At least 3,000 deaths linked to Indian residential schools: new research."

CTVNews

.

N.p

., 19 Feb. 2013. Web. 13 June 2017. <http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/at-least-3-000-deaths-linked-to-indian-residential-schools-new-research-1.1161081

>.News, CBC. "A history of residential schools in Canada." CBCnews. CBC/Radio Canada, 21 Mar. 2016. Web. 13 June 2017

.

<http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/a-history-of-residential-schools-in-canada-1.702280

>.

Joseph, Bob. "Working Effectively with Indigenous Peoples™."

Aboriginal Veterans: Equals on the battlefields, but not at home

.

N.p

.,

n.d.

Web. 13 June 2017. <https://www.ictinc.ca/blog/aboriginal-veterans

>.

"Aboriginal Peoples and World War II."

Tuum

est

.

N.p

.,

n.d.

Web. 18 June 2017. <https://blogs.ubc.ca/emiliaravn/2014/02/13/aboriginal-peoples-and-world-war-ii

/>.

Canada, Veterans Affairs. "Indigenous People in the Second World War."

Veterans Affairs Canada

.

N.p

., 18 Apr. 2017. Web. 18 June 2017. <http://www.veterans.gc.ca/eng/remembrance/history/historical-sheets/aborigin

>.

Government of Canada; Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada. "Aboriginal contributions during the First World War."

Government of Canada; Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada

.

N.p

., 24 Oct. 2014. Web. 18 June 2017. <https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1414152378639/1414152548341

>.

Henderson, William B. "Indian Act."

The Canadian Encyclopedia

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N.p

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Web. 18 June 2017. <http://www.thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/indian-act

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Pilkeyl

, |. "Residential Schools: Primary Sources."

Stuti

Gupta

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N.p

., 15 Dec. 2014. Web. 19 June 2017. <https://stutig.wordpress.com/2014/12/15/primary-sources/>.

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