How communities are using walking to school to

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How communities are using walking to school to




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Presentations text content in How communities are using walking to school to

Slide1

How communities are using walking to school to

address

broad social challenges:

Evidence and practice

Lauren

Marchetti

UNC Highway Safety Research Center

National Center for Safe Routes to School

Presented at

WALK21

Vienna Conference 2015

Slide2

Communities in the US are facing many health- and transportation-related problems from obesity and the short- and long-term impacts of sedentary lifestyles to neighborhood streets with high crime rates, drug violence and gangs.

Slide3

Surprisingly—but no surprise to walking advocates—walk to school programs are part of the solutions.

Slide4

A Look at 10 Years of Promoting Safe Walking and Bicycling to School

Safe

Routes to School

Program successes and trends

Traditional goals—safety and mode shift

Larger goals

Equity

6 programs—3 with traditional goals, 3 with larger goals

Are we reaching a tipping point?

Slide5

Safe Routes to School Program

August 2005

SAFETEA-LU established SRTS as a standalone program Full-time State Coordinator100% Federal funding

July 2012

MAP-21 established TA program (TAP)

SRTS is eligible activity under TAP

State Coordinator is an eligible expenditure

80% Federal funding

Larger MPOs provided funding

Slide6

Far-reaching Benefits

As of March 31, 2015: $1.2 billion in SAFETEA-LU and MAP-21 funds have been awarded to:17,400 schoolsreaching 6.8 million students in all 50 states + D.C.

Slide7

Interest in Data-based Decision-making

As of March 2015, SRTS data system had:1.3 million parent surveys270,000 travel talliesfrom 12,400 schools

Slide8

Far-reaching Benefits

Low-resourced areas are well served

Slide9

Interest in Walking and Bicycling

Since 2004:

More than

34,000 Walk to School Day events

nationwide

More

than

18,500 schools

in more than

4,700 different

municipalities

Slide10

What motivates your school/community to participate in Walk to School events?

Sense

of community

Enhancing

safety

Physical

activity/obesity prevention

Congestion and air pollution

Slide11

More Students Walking and Bicycling to School

Parent

survey results from

5,300 schools from 2007–2013:

Walking

to

school

increased

by 25%

in the morning and

by 27%

in the afternoon

The percentage of parents reporting school support for walking and bicycling to school

increased by 53%

Slide12

More Students Walking and Bicycling to School

A study of 801 schools over 5 years:25 percent increase walking and bicycling after education and encouragement18 percent increase in walking and bicycling after infrastructure (McDonald, et al, 2014; Journal of the American Planning Association)

Slide13

Safety Benefits of SRTS

Courtesy of David Henderson,

Miami-Dade MPO

;

Rachele

Solomon,

WalkSafe

; Vivian G.

Villaamil

,

Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Slide14

Safety Benefits of SRTS

Work funded by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Grant 1 R49 CE002096)

Charles DiMaggio

Guohua

Li

44

% decrease

in number of child pedestrian

injuries in NYC (DiMaggio

& Li, 2013;

Pediatrics

)

43%

 

reduction

in

child pedestrian

and bicyclist injury

among

youth in

Texas

(

DiMaggio, Brady,

& Li, 2013;

Injury Epidemiology

)

Slide15

Safety Benefits of SRTS

75 Schools in California have seen a

73% reduction in pedestrian and bicyclist crashes among all ages near infrastructure, n.s. for child pedestrians (Ragland, Cooper, et al, 2013; Active Living Research)

Jill Cooper

Slide16

Broader Benefits from SRTS

Reduce school and district transportation costs Address absenteeismImprove readiness to learnConnect residents with essential servicesEnhance community life

Slide17

Improving Safety:Child Pedestrian Injuries Reduced by 63 Percent

Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Miami-Dade

County, Florida

Slide18

4

th

largest

school

district in

nation

Partnership of transportation, health and law

enforcement

Infrastructure

improvements

WalkSafe

education program

started with 4

schools in 2002,

grew to 222 schools today

Slide19

Safety Benefits of SRTS

Courtesy of David Henderson,

Miami-Dade MPO

;

Rachele

Solomon,

WalkSafe

; Vivian G.

Villaamil

,

Miami-Dade County Public Schools

Slide20

Increasing Walking and Bicycling:Walking and Bicycling grow from 12 to 43%

Heatherwood Elementary SchoolBoulder Colorado

Slide21

Tripled number of

students

walking and bicycling in 3 years

Infrastructure, encouragement and education activities

Intensive Learning Center focused on children with

autism

Fleet of

specially

equipped tandem

b

ikes

Slide22

Children with Autism on Tandem Bikes

“We took a huge risk trying something that had never been done before, and it turned out beautifully. We had lots of parents with tears in their eyes and children who had never been on a bike before not wanting to get off of the tandems.”

- Program Coordinator Amy Thompson

Slide23

Reducing Transportation Costs:Early SRTS Funding Still Saving Money

Auburn School District

Auburn, Washington

Slide24

Grant in 2007 to implement 20-year vision to increase walking and bicycling to school and reduce school transportation costs

Infrastructure improvements, safety education and incentive programs

Bus use decreased from 6 to 1

In 2015, transportation cost savings is still $220,000 per year

Slide25

Connecting Services, Improving Quality of Life and Promoting Economic Revitalization

Elbert-Palmer Elementary School

Wilmington, Delaware

Slide26

Improvements for low-resource

neighborhood

Infrastructure improvements provide connections between school and nearby housing, parks, community center, community gardens and shops

Slide27

Enhancing Community Life, Addressing Absenteeism and Improving Readiness to Learn

Brightwood

Elementary School

Brightwood

, Massachusetts

Slide28

97% of children live within one mile of

school

Brightwood

had highest rates of violent crime in the

city

2 Massachusetts State Troopers started Counter

Criminal

Continuum (C3)

Slide29

Slide30

Bayside

Brightwood

Health Center

Residents were hesitant to walk, to get to know their

neighbors

or let their children out to

play

Childhood obesity was a health care crisis

Slide31

Six Goals

Daily

exercise to

aid

in reducing childhood obesity

Increased safety for the children and the neighborhood

Decreased absenteeism and tardiness

Increased learning capacity

Reduce carbon footprint around the

school

Community engagement

Slide32

Health department and principal identified walking route

Small group of teachers walked with students

Expanded to 3 routes

Parents joined in, businesses donated scarfs, mittens and umbrellas

Credited with improving attendance, reducing tardiness, and reducing crime

Expanded to all Springfield Elementary schools and spread across state

Featured on 60 Minutes

Slide33

Slide34

Connecting Schools and Neighborhoods

Brevard Elementary School

Brevard

, North Carolina

Slide35

In 2008, constructed multi-use paths to connect school, residential neighborhoods, medical facility and senior living

communities

By 2013, began funding connections to schools and to neighborhoods and city’s trail network

Slide36

Building a Bike Culture for Middle School Students

Omro Middle School

Omro

, Wisconsin

Slide37

New York? Paris? No, a Bike Share Program at a middle school in Wisconsin

Championed by physical education teacher and principal

Young mechanics club

Eighth grade bicycle junto

As of spring 2015, 1 in 6

regularly

walks or bikes to school

Slide38

Are We Reaching a Tipping Point?

An estimated

18,500

schools

have participated in SRTS activities since the Federal SRTS Program

began

Therefore, about

18.5 percent

of all

K-8 schools

in the country have adopted

SRTS in the past 10 years

Slide39

Are We Reaching a Tipping Point?

Since 2004:

More than

34,000 Walk to School Day

events

nationwide

More

than

18,500

schools

in more than

4,700 different

municipalities

Slide40

Are We Reaching a Tipping Point?

Slide41

Are We Reaching a Tipping Point?

4

Source: http://www.smartgrowthamerica.org/complete-streets/changing-policy/complete-streets-atlas

Slide42

Recommendations

Let’s grow it. Let’s not kill it by mistake.

Advocate

for

walking and bicycling

infrastructure improvements

around schools

Encourage State DOTs, MPOs, RPOs, communities and neighborhoods to prioritize

safe

walking

and bicycling to

school

Support

communities’ desire

to be more active through walking

and bicycling

Provide opportunities to test

drive

walk a change

Slide43

Thank you. Questions?

A lifetime of being active can begin on the way to school.


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