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Miniature Golf Courses - PowerPoint Presentation

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Uploaded On 2016-05-31

Miniature Golf Courses - PPT Presentation

Chester Leibs What does the article do Why is the miniature golf course is important to the American landscape methods for the manufacture and construction of the courses Materials used miniature golf literature ID: 343123

miniature golf hazards courses golf miniature courses hazards putting links featured owner materials thumb commercial constructed popularity designs practice

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Slide1

Miniature Golf Courses

Chester LeibsSlide2

What does the article do?

Why is the miniature golf course is important to the American landscape.

methods for the manufacture and construction of the courses

Materials used

miniature golf literature

“Bricoleur’s” work of art.Slide3

Leisure activity

The first ever 18-hole putting course was reported to exist in Germany in 1915.

Front-lawn

practice links so that guests could sharpen their game skills.Slide4
Slide5

New materials

1922 Thomas Fairbairn, owner of a cotton plantation in Mexico, and two associates, all apparently were avid golfers, found that packed cottonseed hulls made an excellent putting surface.

patent

for "a surfacing material for putting greens comprising comminuted flocculent material into a homogenous mass." Slide6

Creating a new sport

In 1927, a hotel owner in Chattanooga decided to add an additional attraction to his property. A miniature golf course was erected complete with new hazards.

It

was believed to be a place children could go while they were visiting; however, it was soon evident that the adults played more than anyone.

The owner, Garnet Carter, soon realized the potential of these links and started the miniature golf-course business. Slide7
Slide8

Making leisure democratic

Liebs

connects the rise in popularity of mini-golf with other developments of equality.

ability to travel by the automobile

movie theater

Radio

During

the Depression, miniature golf provided employment.Slide9
Slide10

Franchise

The hazards and designs on these courses were taken from the fantasy of the midway and commercial roadside architecture

Popular

symbols were used to draw in customers, such as lighthouses, windmills, and even characters such as Mickey Mouse.

Los

Angeles-based

Miniature Golf Management

featured everything from, "sources of equipment and new course designs to advice on how to placate municipal officials.“

Popular

Mechanics

published plans for backyard miniature golf, which people built out of scraps of lumber, old tires, and other found materials.Slide11

New locations

New courses, both Tom Thumb and otherwise, were predominantly located in urban areas

occupying rooftops

Basements

vacant lots along Main Street

Later the

taxpayer strip. Slide12

Typology

The putting green, a descendant of the practice links featured miniature topographical undulations, sand traps and other elements commonly found on the regulation golf courses.

The fairyland, featured mechanical hazards placed in fanciful settings, with novelty rather then improving one's game of gold as their chief appeal. Slide13

Decline

Fully national by 1929. Declines quickly after 1931

.

The reaction to popularity

Idle youth

Noise

UncontrolledSlide14
Slide15

Post-WWII forms

handmade genre. "Constructed of odds and ends

A

high degree of native genius

Innovation

handicraft

.

Many

of the hazards at Putt-A-Round were constructed of "fragments of cultural residue," such as old appliances, boats, and vehicles.

Postwar

courses were situated along major tourist highways and commercial stripsSlide16
Slide17
Slide18

Mid-1950s and later

Courses reverted toward the factory-built courses reminiscent of the early Tom Thumb courses.

Since

having new surprises is important to the miniature golf businesses, there is a franchiser called

Lomma

Enterprises that has a "Swap-Shop" arrangement where an operator can exchange obstacles and hazards each year.