U.S. Foreign Policy The Goals of U.S. Foreign Policy PowerPoint Presentation

U.S. Foreign Policy The Goals of U.S. Foreign Policy PowerPoint Presentation

2018-10-29 9K 9 0 0

Description

U.S. foreign policy seeks to promote, protect, and project the foreign policy agenda and interests of the United States. There are three goals in order to meet this objective:. 1. National Security. ID: 702528

Embed code:

Download this presentation



DownloadNote - The PPT/PDF document "U.S. Foreign Policy The Goals of U.S. Fo..." is the property of its rightful owner. Permission is granted to download and print the materials on this web site for personal, non-commercial use only, and to display it on your personal computer provided you do not modify the materials and that you retain all copyright notices contained in the materials. By downloading content from our website, you accept the terms of this agreement.

Presentations text content in U.S. Foreign Policy The Goals of U.S. Foreign Policy

Slide1

U.S. Foreign Policy

Slide2

The Goals of U.S. Foreign Policy

U.S. foreign policy seeks to promote, protect, and project the foreign policy agenda and interests of the United States. There are three goals in order to meet this objective:

1. National Security

2. Economic Prosperity

3. International Humanitarian Policies or Creating a Better World

Slide3

U.S. National Security Policy

The chief purpose of the nation’s foreign policy is protection of the United States’ security in an often hostile world. The world is anarchic, chaotic, and unpredictable.

To protect the nation’s security, the United States has built an enormous military apparatus and complex array of intelligence gathering institutions.

The United States seeks supreme influence in the world as the sole superpower of the international system as the U.S. seeks to remain the nation-state in the world with the most power. The U.S. seeks glory for its deeds and stewardship of the international system.

Slide4

Slide5

Slide6

Slide7

Slide8

The Cold War

In the aftermath of World War II, the United States developed a new security policy known as deterrence, the development and maintenance of military strength as a means of discouraging attack and “containing” the growing power of the Soviet Union.

During the Cold War (the period of struggle between the United States and the former Soviet Union between the late 1940s and about 1990), some argued that the United States should attack the Soviets before it was too late.

A policy of deterrence not only requires the possession of large military forces but also requires the nation pursuing such a policy to convince political adversaries that it is willing to fight. Deterrence does assume certainty and rationality, which may not be appropriate to current security threats.

Slide9

Slide10

Slide11

Cold War Proxy Wars

1945-1949 Chinese Civil War

1946-1949 Greek Civil War

1948-1949 Berlin Blockade

1950-1953 Korean War

1954-1975 Vietnam War

1961-1962 Cuba

1967-1975 Cambodia Civil War

1973 Chile military junta

1973-1989 Middle East conflict

1977-1978 Ethiopia

1978-1992 Soviet occupation of Afghanistan

1976-1988 Angola Civil War

1980-1992 Salvadoran Civil War

1979-1990 Nicaraguan Civil War

Slide12

Slide13

Status of World Nuclear Forces 2015*

 Country

Deployed

Strategic

Deployed

Nonstrategic

Reserve/

Nondeployed

Military

Stockpile

Total Inventory

 Russia

 1,780

a

0

b

 2,720

c

4,500

 7,500

d

 United States

 1,900

e

180

f

 2,620

g

4,700

h

7,200

i

 France

 290

j

n.a.

10

j

300

300

 China

 0

k

?

k

250

250

250

k

 United Kingdom

150

l

n.a.

65

215

215

l

 Israel

 0

n.a.

80

80

80

m

 Pakistan

 0

n.a.

100-120

100-120

100-120

n

 India

 0

n.a.

90-110

90-110

90-110

o

 North Korea

 0

n.a.

<10

<10

<10

p

Total:

q

 ~4,120

~180

~6,000

~10,300

 ~15,700

Slide14

Slide15

Slide16

Evolution of U.S. Security Policy: Preemption

It is difficult to deter groups or rogue leaders in these cases because they may be willing to accept or may not fully grasp the political costs of their action. To counter these new security threats, the United States has shifted to a policy of preemption, in which the United States displays its willingness to strike first to prevent an enemy attack.

The Bush Doctrine - President George W. Bush’s administration, foreign policy was the agenda’s centerpiece after the 9/11 attacks, which reaffirmed his determination to be an effective commander in chief, and the public approval of these actions remained high for a significant period of time. The president announced the Bush Doctrine, a foreign policy based on the idea that the United States should take preemptive action against national security threats.

Drone Strikes: Drones have been the Obama administration’s tool of choice for taking out militants outside of Iraq and Afghanistan. Drones aren’t the exclusive weapon – traditional airstrikes and other attacks have also been reported. But by one estimate, 95 percent of targeted killings since 9/11 have been conducted by drones. Among the benefits of drones: they don’t put American troops in harm’s way.

Slide17

Slide18

Slide19

Other U.S. Foreign Policy objectives

Economic Prosperity: The United States international economic policies are intended to expand employment in the United States, maintain access to foreign energy supplies at a reasonable cost, promote foreign investment in the United States, and lower the prices Americans pay for goods and services. American trade policy promotes goods and services abroad.

International Humanitarian Policies: A third goal of American foreign policy is to make the world a better place for all its inhabitants. The main forms of policy that address this goal are international environmental policy, international human rights policy, and international peacekeeping.

Slide20

The Presidency and its impact on U.S. Foreign Policy

Presidents have always been domestic politicians, and foreign policy has been treated as an extension of the former. For example, during President George W. Bush’s administration, foreign policy was the agenda’s centerpiece after the 9/11 attacks, which reaffirmed his determination to be an effective commander in chief, and the public approval of these actions remained high for a significant period of time.

Slide21

Instruments of American Foreign Policy

The United States tools include diplomacy, the United Nations, the international monetary structure, economic aid, collective security, and military deterrence.

The United Nations - Sometimes the UN has been a convenient cover for U.S. foreign policy goals. Its ability to serve the United States as a foreign policy tool has been underestimated, because it has few powers and no armed forces to implement its decisions.

Collective Security - The treaties created the Organization of American States, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and others to defend the member nations against any armed attack. In addition, American entered into a number a bilateral treaties (treaties made between two nations) for national security purposes. The United States is viewed as a security producer, and its allies as security consumers.

Slide22

Lecture – California Politics

What is an initiative? - A ballot proposition enacted by the initiative process may alter the state constitution, or amend the ordinary laws of the state, or do both. An initiative is brought about by writing a proposed law as a petition, and submitting the petition to the California Attorney General. The initiative process allows citizens to go around the Legislature and propose laws.

What is an referendum? - In California a vote on a measure referred to voters by the legislature is a mandatory referendum. The State Legislature may pass an act which is signed by the Governor of California, proposing a state constitutional amendment, which is then submitted to the voters as a referendum at the next statewide election.

What is a recall election? - A recall election is a procedure by which voters can remove an elected official from office through a direct vote before his or her term has ended. In California, voters may recall elected, statewide officers from office, which includes governors, members of the State Legislature, members of the California judiciary, including the state Supreme Court.


About DocSlides
DocSlides allows users to easily upload and share presentations, PDF documents, and images.Share your documents with the world , watch,share and upload any time you want. How can you benefit from using DocSlides? DocSlides consists documents from individuals and organizations on topics ranging from technology and business to travel, health, and education. Find and search for what interests you, and learn from people and more. You can also download DocSlides to read or reference later.