Introducing Open Referral

Introducing Open Referral Introducing Open Referral - Start

2016-07-01 31K 31 0 0

Introducing Open Referral - Description

Greg Bloom | . bloom@codeforamerica.org. Chief Organizing Officer, Open Referral Initiative. @. greggish. | #. openreferral. . www.openreferral.org. PREFACE:. PREFACE:. Open Referral is not scraping your data.. ID: 386250 Download Presentation

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Introducing Open Referral




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Presentations text content in Introducing Open Referral

Slide1

Introducing Open ReferralGreg Bloom | bloom@codeforamerica.orgChief Organizing Officer, Open Referral Initiative

@

greggish | #openreferral

www.openreferral.org

Slide2

PREFACE:

Slide3

PREFACE:

Open Referral is not scraping your data.

Slide4

PREFACE:

Open Referral is not scraping your data.

Open Referral is not trying to sell your data.

Slide5

PREFACE:

Open Referral is not scraping your data.

Open Referral is not trying to sell your data.

Open Referral is not trying to build a national database.

Slide6

PREFACE:

Open Referral is not scraping your data.Open Referral is not trying to sell your data.Open Referral is not trying to build a national database.This is not a trap.

Slide7

Free / Open Source : Some Terms

Slide8

Free / Open Source : Some Terms

Public Information

Stuff that everyone has a right to know.

Slide9

Free / Open Source : Some Terms

Public Information

Open Data

Stuff that everyone has a right to know.

Organized sets of data that can be freely accessed, taken, "remixed" with other data, etc.

Slide10

Free / Open Source : Some Terms

Public Information

Open Data

Open Source

Stuff that everyone has a right to know.

Organized sets of data that can be freely accessed, taken, "remixed" with other data, etc.

Media (applications, content, etc) that can be seen, modified, repurposed.

Slide11

Free / Open Source : Some Terms

Public Information

Open Data

Open Source

Stuff that everyone has a right to know.

Organized sets of data that can be freely accessed, taken, "remixed" with other data, etc.

Media (applications, content, etc) that can be seen, modified, repurposed.

Free Speech

Your constitutional liberties.

Slide12

Free / Open Source : Some Terms

Public Information

Open Data

Open Source

Stuff that everyone has a right to know.

Organized sets of data that can be freely accessed, taken, "remixed" with other data, etc.

Media (applications, content, etc) that can be seen, modified, repurposed.

Free Speech

Free Beer

Your constitutional liberties.

Hey,

thanks

!

Slide13

Free / Open Source : Some Terms

Public Information

Open Data

Open Source

Stuff that everyone has a right to know.

Organized sets of data that can be freely accessed, taken, "remixed" with other data, etc.

Media (applications, content, etc) that can be seen, modified, repurposed.

Free Speech

Free Beer

Free Puppy

Your constitutional liberties.

Hey, thanks!

Got a mop?

Slide14

No really, what is ‘Open Data’?

It’s an ambiguous term. Let’s clarify.

Slide15

No really, what is ‘Open Data’?

Open means ‘free,’ as in ‘free speech’: we are all entitled to it by fundamental right.Open does not necessarily mean ‘anything goes’: you’ve gotta return books to the library, and in good condition too. Even on open roads, there are speed limits, and eventually there are tolls, plus construction and cleanup crews, etc.Open does not necessarily mean ‘free’ as in without cost. For something to exist in an open state, a lot of energy and resources must go into keeping it so.

It’s an ambiguous term. Let’s clarify.

Slide16

No really, what is ‘Open Data’?

Open indicates accessibility: We have “open access” to things like roads and libraries — these are public goods, and anyone should be able to use them. In the context of the internet, ‘open’ means that information can flow freely between systems.

It’s an ambiguous term. Let’s clarify.

Slide17

No really, what is ‘Open Data’?

Open Data is provided under terms that permit reuse and redistribution, including the intermixing with other datasets. This means data must be machine-readable and interoperable. The data can be licensed to prevent changes and/or to ensure clear documentation of changes, and even to require payment for certain kinds of use.This is a modified version of the Open Knowledge Foundation’s Open Data definition.

It’s an ambiguous term. Let’s clarify.

Slide18

To review: what is ‘Open Data’?

Open data is credited

data

.

Open data can be licensed with various conditions.

Open data can generate revenue.

For the purposes of Open Referral, the concept of ‘open data’ is itself open to some degree of interpretation.

Essentially, we are asking:

how

should this data be open?

Slide19

Another term: Community Organizing

Community organizers

create space and time in which groups of people with shared interests come together to

think

differently

,

dream

bigger

,

develop a sense of themselves

, and take action to

build the world that they want to live in

.

Slide20

The Democratic Arts of Combination

“In democratic countries, knowledge of how to combine is the mother of all other forms of knowledge; on its progress depends that of all the

others.”

–Alexis de

Tocqueville,

Democracy in America

Slide21

A commons is… A shared resource that is subject to dilemmas.

Slide22

A commons is… A shared resource that is subject to dilemmas.

Community resource data is a commons:

Public information but not a ‘public good’

Non-subtractive and non-exclusive (can be used by

multiple parties for multiple purposes

without

being depleted)

Decays rapidly, costly to maintain

Slide23

A commons is… A shared resource that is subject to dilemmas.

Community resource data is a commons:

Public information but not a ‘public good’

Non-subtractive and non-exclusive (can be used by

multiple parties for multiple purposes

without

being depleted)

Decays rapidly, costly to maintain

Tragedy of the community resource data commons:

Enclosure (institutional ownership)

Not interoperable (not readable by external systems)

Grassroots collection efforts are unsustainable.

So:

redundant

, fragmented, inefficient, etc

Slide24

Tragedy Drama of the commons

"At any time that individuals may gain from the costly action of others, without themselves contributing time and effort, they face

collective action dilemmas

for which there are coping methods.

” ~ Nobel Laureate Elinor

Ostrom

Slide25

Okay. Story time!

Slide26

The District of Columbia:

In the late 90s, a consortium of service providers tried to develop a city-wide resource directory system. The project failed due to power struggle over data ownership. The DC Government assumed responsibility.

In 2004, the DC government certified as a 2-1-1 system. The government merged 2-1-1 into its 3-1-1 calling center. There was never an investment in updating the data.

Slide27

At Bread for the City: Resource directory with 1500 services – in Access.2 out of 3 “walk-ins” just get referred elsewhere.Many come just for referrals.

'Walk-ins'

Referral

I

ntake

Community-produced Resource Directories:

Slide28

Key point:

Social workers and other service providers deal with this information every day.

In any given community, some of them take time to aggregate it.

This knowledge, when aggregated, is valuable.

Slide29

Community-Driven web-based I&R projects

Open 211

DC Food Finder

BRIDGE Project

Slide30

Vendors flooding the space:

Slide31

Vendors:

Pros:

Innovative, service-oriented features

User-friendly design

Both long overdue!

Cons:

Each vendor creates their own database, treats data as competitive advantage

More privatization and fragmentation!

Slide32

Key point:

These vendors are emerging, and finding success.

They are finding success because people and institutions need this data in their own workflow.

Some of them are willing to pay money to access it.

Slide33

Code for America

Founded in 2009 to address the widening gap between the public and private sectors in their effective use of technology and design.Embed ‘fellows’ (geeks) in city and county governments for year-long residencies where they try to solve problems.

Slide34

Government as platform

Public information as open, machine-readable, re-usable and re-mixable data.

Citizen contribution and collaboration

Transparency

Lightweight development practices

Cloud computing

(O’Reilly 2009)

Slide35

Civic hacking

Hacking is

not

criminal activity.

Hacking means ‘creative problem solving.’

Many creative people out there want to help solve problems.

Slide36

Open211: FAIL

211: data on decentralized social sector, not one gov systemOpen211: just a database appI&Rs are mostly private orgs, don’t fall under executive mandateI&R Data is labor intensive“The crowd” isn’t great at generating this data. It’s obscure, complex, and sensitive.

“Open” Civic Technology: Open211 vs Open311

Open311: Success

311

: municipal service requests

Open311

= a set of standards and

protocols

for opening 311 systems via ‘API’

“Government as platform”

E

xternal

applications

can

read

from

and even write to

a

city’s

service

request system

.

See:

SeeClickFix

,

other

apps

.

Slide37

What is an API?

A set of instructions that enable information systems to ‘talk’ to each other.

A contract. (‘You give me this, I’ll give you that.’)

A web page used by software

Slide38

Draw an API:

MAAAAGIC

Slide39

Draw an API:

Robot orifices

Slide40

Draw an API: a friendly server

Slide41

Draw an API: Cake Factory

Slide42

Draw an API: Robot Bartender

Slide43

Draw an API:

a church

Slide44

API - Ohanapi.org

Produced by Code for America’s 2013 fellows.For San Mateo County in California.

Slide45

Ohana API is a ‘reference implementation’ of the Open Referral model.

A reference implementation is an example.

It’s Open Source –

you can download it for free

you can see the source code

you can adapt it to fit your needs.

Slide46

Schema.org: ‘Civic Services Schema’

“A new vocabulary… has been proposed to improve search engines’ understanding of these services. It is intended to provide enough information to determine the service, the area covered by the service, and relevant information for using the service.” http://blog.schema.org/

Slide47

Diff schemas for diff purposes:

XML developed by AIRSFor exchange of data between 211 systemsAlso used by HUD and HMIS systems

AIRS XSD

HTML markup language proposed by Google For search engines and associated productsDesigned for federal/city services, but extensible to social servicesCould be interoperable with AIRS?

W3C Civic Services schema

???

Slide48

'Walk-ins'

Referral

I

ntake

Back in DC:

Slide49

STEP 1:

MERGE

THE DATA

UNIQUE ID for every service, to be recognized by every database.

Slide50

STEP 2: Open the DATA COMMONS

C

loud-based data catalogue withOpen API (Application Programming Interface)

Slide51

SUCCESS???

Slide52

STEP

3

:

INSTITUTIONAL REALIGNMENT

Slide53

Building a better system.

Building a

healthier

ecosystem

.

Slide54

These are dilemmas.

There are solutions.

We need to discover them.

Slide55

Enter:

the Open Referral Initiative

Slide56

Enter: the Open Referral Initiative

Goal:

develop the means to ensure that all this stuff is

open

,

interoperable, reliable, sustainable

.

A common language

for structuring community resource directory data, and protocols for exchanging it.

Demo

open platforms

that can integrate

existing

and

new

referral systems.

Slide57

Enter: the Open Referral Initiative

Scope:

Service directory data (organizations -> services -> sites) –

that’s it

.

Designed in accordance with AIRS XSD and W3C schema.

Supporting local implementations of this model

Slide58

Enter: the Open Referral Initiative

Process:

Multi-stakeholder engagement

P

articipatory action research

Iterative user testing

Tiers of Local/global governance

Slide59

Enter: the Open Referral Initiative

Local Teams:

Stakeholders

at center

: organizations and civic groups that make referrals daily

Vendors as

partners

, implementing according to user prerogatives.

Slide60

Enter: the Open Referral Initiative

Working Group

Subject matter specialists: academics, vendors, people with expertise in interoperability

Reviewing and advising local teams

Researching options for governance/sustainability

Slide61

Enter: the Open Referral Initiative

Values

Accessibility

Interoperability

Reliability

Sustainability

Slide62

Thanks for listening.

Slide63

Icons by the Noun Projecthttp://thenounproject.com

Application

by Kyle Sasquie Klitch

Data File

by iconoci

Group

by Tonielle Krisanski

Library

by libberry

Database

by Romeo Barreto

Category

by Berkay Sargin

Community Mapping

by Iconathon

Data

by United Nations OCHA

Tag

by Ian Hamilton

Community Health Advocate

by Edward Boatman

Slide64

Slide65

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