Graffiti --

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Graffiti --




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Presentations text content in Graffiti --

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Graffiti --

positive or negative

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What do you think of when you think of GRAFFITI?

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What emotions do you feel when you see this?

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Or this?

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Would you want this on your place of worship?

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Would you take this down or leave it?

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A Different Look at Graffiti

Look at the following pictures and think about whether your opinion of graffiti changes.

Should it all be taken down or judged differently?

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Banksy

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Graffiti History

The earliest forms of graffiti date back to 30,000 BC.

The term ‘graffiti’ comes from ancient Rome.

Graffiti and graffito are from the Italian word 

graffiato

 ("scratched"). "Graffiti" is applied in art history to works of art produced by scratching a design into a surface.

Prophetic words or statements of protest were often written on walls so the whole community could see them.

Some of this graffiti can still be seen in the catacombs of Rome.

Wall painting can also be found in Egyptian, Greek and Macedonian culture.

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Graffiti

Ancient Pompeii graffito caricature of a politician.

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Modern Graffiti

Graffiti flourished again in the 1960’s and 70’s.

Young people in the South Bronx used graffiti to create a dialogue between fellow graffiti artists and society. They established their name through

tags(scrawling

signature of their nickname) and created ‘fame’ for themselves.

In most cases graffiti is illegal.

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Graffiti Terms

Writer: A graffiti artist.

Tag: A stylized signature, normally done in one color. The simplest and most prevalent type of graffiti, a tag is often done in a color that contrasts sharply with its background. 

Throw-up: or "

throwie

“. Generally consists of a one-color outline and one layer of fill-color. Easy-to-paint bubble shapes often form the letters. Designed for quick execution, to avoid attracting attention to the writer. 

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Graffiti Terms (ii)

Piece: A large and labor-intensive graffiti painting. Pieces often incorporate 3-D effects, arrows, and many colors and color-transitions, as well as various other effects. Originally shorthand for masterpiece, considered the full and most beautiful work of graffiti.

Black book: graffiti artist's sketchbook. Often used to sketch out and plan potential graffiti, and to collect tags from other writers.

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Graffiti Terms

Example of a tag

Example of a ‘throw up

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Graffiti Terms

Example of a Piece

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Graffiti Style

Writers took the shapes inherent in standard English characters, expanded them, decorated them, and made them much more than just simple letters.

They used these stylized letters to spell their names and make statements.

The more creative the style, and the more often their work appeared, the more popular the writer would become with fellow writers.

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Graffiti Style

Lettering can become so stylized they can be difficult for the general public to read.

There is often an interaction of text and images.

Writers often borrow iconography from popular culture, such as cartoons or comic figures, this is called appropriation.

Many writer’s invent their own caricatures, and these figures become associated with their names, adding to their fame.

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Appropriation and Recontextualization

To appropriate is to take possession of something. Appropriation artists deliberately copy images to take possession of them in their art. They are not stealing or plagiarizing. They are not passing off these images as their very own.

Appropriation artists want the viewer to recognize the images they copy, and they hope that the viewer will bring all of his/her original associations with the image to the artist's new context, be it a painting, a sculpture, a collage, a combine or an entire installation.

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Appropriation

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Banksy

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