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Artist Statement and Artist Statement and

Artist Statement and - PowerPoint Presentation

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Artist Statement and - PPT Presentation

Resume Worksho p Wood River Valley Studio Tour in collaboration with Sun Valley Center for the Arts Resume Writing The following suggestions come from and can be found on the College Art Association website ID: 469516

list art artist work art list work artist order arts reverse boise personal chronological process address statement knitting sculpture exhibitions nature museum

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Slide1

Artist Statement and Resume Workshop

Wood River Valley Studio Tour in collaboration with Sun Valley Center for the ArtsSlide2

Resume WritingThe following suggestions come from

(and can be found on) the College Art Association website:http://www.collegeart.org/guidelines/resume Slide3

Basic Formatting SuggestionsList your most recent entries first, under each heading.

Use 10–12-point type in a standard, legible typeface, such as Times New Roman, Bodoni, Baskerville, Caslon, Garamond, and Palatino. Avoid

using exotic

typefaces.

San serif typefaces such as Helvetica or Arial

are

usually more difficult to read.Slide4

Resume Content

Depending on your strengths as an artist, you may rearrange the recommended order of some of the categories found below. As a general rule, you should “play to your strengths” by placing more important, relevant, and recent information near the beginning of your résumé.

For

obvious reasons, do not list category headings that are not relevant to you

.Slide5

1. Name (and Contact Information)

Name: Your name can appear in uppercase, bold, or large type. Preferred mailing address: Providing a mailing address is optional. Some artists may prefer not to include this, for security reasons. Phone Number(s): List any numbers (work, studio

, cell, home)

where you are comfortable being contacted. Some artists

may

choose to remove their cell number and other personal address information from their résumé—especially from a website

résumé.

Email

: An email address (a must!) on the artist résumé is typically a personal, non-institutional email address. When you use a personal email address, use one that looks professional.

Personal Website: Personal websites are becoming more and more essential. Providing a URL to a personal website is highly recommended.Slide6

2. EducationList dates (year only, on left) of academic degrees in reverse chronological order, noting honors or distinctions.

If currently enrolled, indicate expected graduation date. If no degree was obtained, indicate period of study after list of degrees earned.Slide7

Sample

2013

MFA (candidate) in Sculpture, California Institute of the Arts, Valencia, CA

     (expected graduation: May 2013)

2010

BFA in Studio Art, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK

2005

BA

cum laude

, French, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX

2006

Memphis College of Art, Memphis, TN

2004

Pont-

Aven

School of Art, Pont-

Aven

, France (summer session)Slide8

3. Grants/Awards (Grants, fellowships, awards, honors, residencies, etc.)

List in reverse chronological order, with date on left:1998 New York State Council on the Arts Fellowship, New York, NY Artist-in-Residency Fellowship, Roswell Museum and Art Center, Roswell, NM

*Residencies can also be listed as a separate category.Slide9

4. Exhibition RecordThis is the most important section of the resume, and can be listed before Grants/Awards

If you have many exhibitions, break them into categories: solo exhibitions and group exhibitionsList in reverse chronological order, noting:YearTitle of exhibition

(in italics)

Name of venue

City, State

If applicable, also list juror or curatorSlide10

Sample

Solo Exhibitions:2012 Rapid Oxidation, Enso Artspace, Boise, ID

Burn Pile

, The Friesen Gallery, Northwest

Nazarene University, Nampa, ID

2008

No Nature, Only Things

, J Crist Gallery, Boise, ID

Group Exhibitions:

Forests, Foraging and Fire

, Sun Valley Center for

the Arts, Ketchum, ID

Idaho Triennial

, Boise Museum of Art, Boise, ID

(curated by Bonnie Laing-

Malcolmsen

, Portland Art Museum)Slide11

5. Commissions (if applicable, and especially for public art)List in reverse chronological order, noting type of project, title, medium, location, commissioning entity:

Public Art Commission, Diversity and

Hope

, 8 x 16 ft. painting, acrylic and oil on

canvas and panel, Charlotte Convention

Center, Charlotte-Mecklenburg Arts &

Science Council, Charlotte, NCSlide12

6. Collections (Public, Corporate, Private)List alphabetically, under subcategories if needed.

Always obtain permission of private collectors before listing them.Do not list friends/family members.Sample:Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC

Norton Family Collection, San Jose, CA

Paterson Museum, Paterson, NJ

Progressive Art Collection, Cleveland, OH

West Collection, Paoli, PASlide13

7. BibliographyList places your work has appeared published: books, magazines, newspapers, websites, TV or radio

List in reverse chronological order following a specific bibliographical style (Chicago Manual of Style, MLA, etc.) – choose one and be consistent.Slide14

Samples

Eve Diaz, “Critic’s Picks,” Artforum, February 28, 2010. http://artforum.com/archive/id=25015Willard W. Wilson, “Sculpture Exhibition,” Syracuse Gazette, Syracuse, NY, December 11, 1998. 42.

Diane

Terrel

, “New Work in Central New York,”

Sculpture

17, no. 1 (January 1998): 63.

Jane Williams, Interview, WUWJ Radio, Utica, NY, December 9, 1997.Slide15

8. Publications as AuthorList in reverse chronological order, following same format as above

Omit author (your) nameSlide16

9. Teaching or Related Experience

Teaching Experience2009-10 Visiting Assistant Professor, Boise State University, Boise, IDRelated Experience

2010-12 Curator, Sun Valley Center for the

Arts, Ketchum, IDSlide17

10. Lectures/Workshops (Presentations, Artist Talks, etc.)List in reverse chronological order

Note type of event, title (if applicable), venue, location, dates Lecture/Presentation, School of the Art Institute of

Chicago, Chicago, IL, November 8

Workshop, “Visual Artist Focus: Working with Galleries

101,” Manhattan Arts Council, New York, NY, October 16

Artist Talk, School of the Visual Arts, New York, NY,

February 15-18Slide18

11. Curatorial ProjectsIf you have curatorial experience, list projects in reverse chronological order

Include title (in italics), venue, city, state Make it Real, co-curated with Alison Gerber, No

Name Exhibitions at The Soap Factory,

Minneapolis, MN

Idaho Triennial

, Juror, Boise Art Museum, Boise,

IDSlide19

12. Gallery AffiliationOnly list those galleries where you have current representation

Do not list galleries where you have exhibited unless they currently represent youSamples:Hodges Taylor Gallery, Charlotte, NC

Arthur Rogers Gallery, New Orleans, LASlide20

Artist’s StatementWhy do I need one?

I make pictures not words. Shouldn’t the work stand for itself?

Using written

language to express what you do

visually.

Statement is a way in to the work

O

ffers guidance and an introduction

Artists need to be able to be articulate about their work—the

exercise

of writing a statement can help strengthen and guide your

practice and clarify your ideasSlide21

How Can Artist Statements Help Viewers (and Artists)? A Case Study

Troy SimmonsSlide22

Opposites attract. Although rather cliché, it’s a theme that echoes true to my intense fascination with nature and modern Brutalist Architecture. Concrete, acrylic and raw natural elements allow me to physically explore the ideological perceptions of incompatible binary relationships. (…)

As I create, I envision images of vegetation growing from a single crevice in a concrete sidewalk, post apocalyptic cities with skyscrapers and buildings overtaken by fields of dandelions and tulips. My art is created to show the beauty of persistence and coexistence. Whether in our relationships or careers, it’s a struggle we all encounter in our daily lives. -Troy SimmonsSlide23

Artist’s StatementWhat should it include?

Insight into intention, process, influences

Why

you make your art?

What

do you make?

What

inspires/influences you to make your art?

Why

have you chosen the medium/material you use?

I

want to make art that….

Do not tell people what

to feel or see but where it comes from—make it personal not theoreticalSlide24

Make it personal

I use my own constructed image as a vehicle for questioning ideas about the role of tradition, the nature of family, monogamy, polygamy, relationships between men and women, between women and their children, and between women and other women– underscoring the critical problems and the possible resolves. In one way or another, my work endlessly explodes the limits of tradition.

C

arrie Mae

W

eemsSlide25

Artist’s StatementHOW?

Sit down, and writeUse simple adult language that is welcoming (no jargon)2-3

paragraphs of 3 to 4 sentences each

Clarity is best. Brevity is good.

Put

it away. Show it to someone you trust and who reads or writes.

Rewrite.Slide26

Three Questions to Ask Before Writing

Who are you really writing for?Tailor your statement to different audiences: jurors, exhibition visitors, grant reviewers all have different needs and expectations of your statement.Which words to you use?It’s okay to use words that are less common, but avoid jargon. Make sure the words you use really mean something in relationship to your art.

How do you structure your sentences?

Keep them short, active, and to the point.Slide27

Editing is key!

Knitting is my key to the secret garden, my way down the rabbit hole, my looking glass.Hand knitting started it. From the beginning the process of transforming string into cloth has struck me as magical. And over the years, that magical process has had its way with me, leading me from hobby to art. Knitting fills me with a sense of accomplishment and integrity, and has proven a most amenable vehicle for translating inner vision to outer reality.

I knit from the inside out. Though I work quite deliberately, consciously employing both traditional and innovative techniques, my unconscious is the undisputed project manager.

The concrete repetitive nature of this work frees my imagination and provides many opportunities for happy accident and grace to influence the finished product.

Recently, I discovered some childhood drawings: simple, crayoned patchworks that resonate deeply with my fiber work. Inspired and invigorated by a renewed sense of continuity, and awed by the mystery of how creation occurs, I am now knitting richly varied fabrics exploring many patterns, textures and colors. Once knit, the fabrics are pieced to form an always new patchwork from which I make my garments and accessories.

Molly GordonSlide28

Editing is key!

Knitting is my key to the secret garden, my way down the rabbit hole, my looking glass.

Hand knitting started it. From the beginning the process of transforming string into cloth has struck me as magical. I knit from the inside out. Though I work quite deliberately, consciously employing both traditional and innovative techniques, my unconscious is the undisputed project manager.

Recently, I discovered some childhood drawings: simple, crayoned patchworks that resonate deeply with my fiber work. Inspired and invigorated by a renewed sense of continuity, and awed by the mystery of how creation occurs, I am now knitting richly varied fabrics exploring many patterns, textures and colors. Once knit, the fabrics are pieced to form an always new patchwork from which I make my garments and accessories.

Molly GordonSlide29

Include process….but not too much

Bean Finneran works with one simple elemental form, a hand rolled curve of clay, repeated and grouped into primary geometric constructions. The clay is a connection to time, to the earth and to human culture. The curve is a meditation on multiplicity in nature like individual blades of grass in a field.

Following

rhythms of renewal and transformation in nature the composition of the sculptures is transitory. Each one of a thousand individual curves is physically independent from the next so that when a sculpture is moved it must be

disassembed

and then reconstructed curve-by-curve. The curves are reinterpreted every time a sculpture is assembled; ever similar and always unique. The process of creating the sculptures has no beginning or endSlide30

Address intention without telling

My work invites confusion on several levels, and that ‘meaning’ is generated in the process of sorting things out. On the most obvious level, we all expect photographs to be pictures of something. We assume that the photographer observed a place, a person, an event in the world and wanted to record it….the problem with my work is that these images are really not of anything in that sense, they register only that which is incidental.

Uta

BarthSlide31

What inspires you to make your art?

(Hans) Holbein brought an enormous amount of dignity to his work (along with rich color and saturation). There was an equality to his paintings—they weren’t demigod portraits, they were just incredibly detailed and real. When I saw that, I realized that I wanted to mirror his work with members of my own community. It seemed like a good conversation to have, especially in relationship to the s/m community, which was thought of—and still is thought of, to an extent—as predatory or perverted.

Catherine Opie Slide32

My paintings are part of a visual dialogue running the length and breadth of human history. The search for excellence in this Art and Craft has led me to​ explore the natural world and the human events that inhabit it, constructing narratives that celebrate and question our presence in the world.

Although representational, I seek a way of painting that is richly traditional, yet radically and surprisingly new. I attempt to articulate more than the surfaces and dimensions of reality, summoning the wordless meanings and sensations that only visual art can

.

Chester ArnoldSlide33

Write with Your Reader in Mind

I explore science through art. By layering acrylic paint, pumice, plaster, and various mediums, I seek to emulate earth patterns, where form and function are intertwined. My mixtures on canvas create organic images that speak of weathering, dripping water, tangled reeds--providing a continuous reminder of the complexity and wonder of the natural world. …

Making

art allows me to reach deep within. Increasingly embracing the physical act and process of painting--rather than focusing on predetermined outcomes--helps me move beyond the analytical to tap into a place of inexplicable energy, life force, and emotion. When I am able to access this well, art works flow forth in mystical pulses. On occasion, the strength of this energy surprises me. This is when painting = bliss.

Wendy Pabich

(These two paragraphs were originally flipped.)Slide34

Resources: Artist’s Statements

http://www.artbusiness.com/artstate.html http://

www.cgu.edu/pages/7483.asp

http://

www.artstudy.org/art-and-design-careers/sample-artist-statement.php

http://www.lightspacetime.com/newsletter/how-to-write-the-perfect-artist-statement/