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Instructor Name. Date, Semester. Criminology . 2011. Chapter 13. WHITE-COLLAR AND ORGANIZED CRIME. 13.1. 13.2. 13.3. 13.4. Understand the relationship between the work of Edwin Sutherland and white-collar crime.. ID: 273815

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Slide1

Class Name,Instructor Name

Date, Semester

Criminology 2011

Chapter 13

WHITE-COLLAR AND ORGANIZED CRIME

Slide2

13.1

13.2

13.3

13.4

Understand the relationship between the work of Edwin Sutherland and white-collar crime.

Be able to define white-collar crime, including the conceptual problems involved.

Be acquainted with the different forms of occupational crime: employee theft (pilferage and embezzling), collective embezzlement in the savings and loan industry, fraud in the professions, health-care fraud (including improper billing and unnecessary surgery), financial fraud, and police/political corruption

Be familiar with organizational criminality and corporate crime, including corporate financial crime (corporate fraud, cheating and corruption, price-fixing, price-gouging, and restraint of trade), and false advertising.

CHAPTER OBJECTIVES

Slide3

13.5

13.6

13.7

Understand how corporate violence poses threats to health and safety: workers and unsafe work places, consumers and unsafe products (the automobile, pharmaceutical, and food industries), and environmental pollution.

Appreciate the economic and human costs of white-collar crime.

Be familiar with the various explanations of white-collar crime, including similarities and differences with street crime, cultural and social bases for white-collar crime, and lenient treatment.

CHAPTER OBJECTIVES

Be acquainted with how white-collar crime might be reduced.

Be familiar with organized crime, including its history, the alien conspiracy model (and myth), and its control.

13.8

13.9

Slide4

Understand the relationship between the work of Edwin Sutherland and white-collar crime.

Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes

13.1

Slide5

5

13.1

Edwin Sutherland

Slide6

Be able to define white-collar crime, including the conceptual problems involved.

Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes

13.2

Slide7

13.2

“A crime committed by a person of respectability and high social status in the course of his occupation”

Slide8

13.2

White Collar Crime

Occupational

Crime

CorporateCrime

8

Slide9

Be acquainted with the different forms of occupational crime: employee theft (pilferage and embezzling), collective embezzlement in the savings and loan industry, fraud in the professions, health-care fraud (including improper billing and unnecessary surgery), financial fraud, and police/political corruption

Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes

13.3

Slide10

Employee

Theft

Healthcare Fraud

Financial Fraud

Collective embezzlement in the savings and loan industry

Fraud in the Professions

Different Forms of Occupational Crime

Police/

Political Corruption

13.3

Slide11

Be familiar with organizational criminality and corporate crime, including corporate financial crime (corporate fraud, cheating and corruption, price-fixing, price-gouging, and restraint of trade), and false advertising.

Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes

13.4

Slide12

13.4

Organizational crime: Crime can be done by and on behalf of organizations

Organizational Crime

Slide13

13.4

False Advertising

CorporateFraud

Cheating/Corruption

Price Fixing

Price Gouging

Financial Crime

13

RestraintofTrade

Corporate Crimes

Slide14

Understand how corporate violence poses threats to health and safety: workers and unsafe work places, consumers and unsafe products (the automobile, pharmaceutical, and food industries), and environmental pollution.

Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes

13.5

Slide15

13.5

Threats to Health and Safety

Workers and Unsafe Work Places

Consumers and Unsafe Products

Environmental Pollution

Slide16

Appreciate the economic and human costs of white-collar crime.

Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes

13.6

Slide17

13.6

Property/Street Crime

$18 Billion

Annually

White Collar-Crime

$564.5 BillionAnnually

vs.

Slide18

Be familiar with the various explanations of white-collar crime, including similarities and differences with street crime, cultural and social bases for white-collar crime, and lenient treatment.

Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes

13.7

Slide19

13.7

Disparity Between Corporate Goals and Means to Achieve Them

Self-Interest, Pursuit of Pleasure, Avoidance

of Pain

Learned Behavior

Why Do People Engage in White-Collar Crime?

Cultural and Social Bases

Lenient Treatment

Slide20

13.7

White-Collar Criminality

Lower-Class Criminality

vs.

Slide21

Be acquainted with how white-collar crime might be reduced.

Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes

13.8

Slide22

13.8

Regulatory Agencies Need Larger Budgets

More Media Attention

More Severe Punishments

Self-Regulation and Compliance Strategies Emphasizing Informal Sanctions

Slide23

Be familiar with organized crime, including its history, the alien conspiracy model (and myth), and its control.

Learning ObjectivesAfter this lecture, you should be able to complete the following Learning Outcomes

13.9

Slide24

Resumed Traditional Positions of Power in Italian Society

Allowed Mafia to Establish Significant Wealth and Power

Mafia Became a Quasi-Police Organization in Italian Ghettoes

Italian Criminal Organizations That Came to the U.S. Included the Mafia and the Black Hand

After WWII

13.9

1930s–1940s

Prohibition

Early 20

th

Century

Late 19

th

–Early 20

th

Century

Hundreds of Years

Brief Early History of the Mafia

Secret

Societies All Throughout Italy

Mafia

Became Very Anti-Fascist

Slide25

13.9

Curtailing Organized Crime

Increase

Law Enforcement

Authority

Slide26

13.9

Curtailing Organized Crime

Reduce Economic Lure

of Involvement in Organized Crime

Slide27

13.9

Curtailing Organized Crime

Decrease Organized Criminal Opportunity

Through Decriminalization or Legalization

of Activities from Which Organized Crime Draws Income

Slide28

13.1

13.2

13.3

13.4

Understand the relationship between the work of Edwin Sutherland and white-collar crime.

Be able to define white-collar crime, including the conceptual problems involved.

Be acquainted with the different forms of occupational crime: employee theft (pilferage and embezzling), collective embezzlement in the savings and loan industry, fraud in the professions, health-care fraud (including improper billing and unnecessary surgery), financial fraud, and police/political corruption

Be familiar with organizational criminality and corporate crime, including corporate financial crime (corporate fraud, cheating and corruption, price-fixing, price-gouging, and restraint of trade), and false advertising.

CHAPTER SUMMARY

Slide29

13.5

13.6

13.7

Understand how corporate violence poses threats to health and safety: workers and unsafe work places, consumers and unsafe products (the automobile, pharmaceutical, and food industries), and environmental pollution.

Appreciate the economic and human costs of white-collar crime.

Be familiar with the various explanations of white-collar crime, including similarities and differences with street crime, cultural and social bases for white-collar crime, and lenient treatment.

CHAPTER SUMMARY

Be acquainted with how white-collar crime might be reduced.

Be familiar with organized crime, including its history, the alien conspiracy model (and myth), and its control.

13.8

13.9

Slide30

Slide31

Slide32


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