Summarizing Text Summary defined
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Summarizing Text Summary defined

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Summarizing Text Summary defined




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Presentation on theme: "Summarizing Text Summary defined"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

Summarizing Text

Slide2

Summary defined

“A summary condenses the original material, presenting its core ideas

in your own words”

(Spurlock, 2013)“…a summary does not present allthe details, and it is generally as brief as possible” (Bullock, 2013)

Bullock, Richard and Maureen Daly Goggin.

The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings.

3

rd

ed., New York, 2013.

Spurlock

, Ann C. et al. 

Guide to Freshman Composition

. 5th ed., Southlake, TX, Fountainhead Press, 2013. Mississippi State University

Slide3

Original Source

In 1938, in a series of now-classic experiments, exposure to synthetic dyes derived from coal and belonging to a class of chemicals called aromatic amines was shown to cause bladder cancer in dogs. These results helped explain why bladder cancers had become so prevalent among dyestuffs workers. With the invention of mauve in 1854, synthetic dyes began replacing natural plant-based dyes in the coloring of cloth and leather. By the beginning of the twentieth century, bladder cancer rates among this group of workers had skyrocketed, and the dog experiments helped unravel this mystery. The International Labor Organization did not wait for the results of these animal tests, however, and in 1921 declared certain aromatic amines to be human carcinogens. Decade later, these dogs provided a lead in understanding why tire-industry workers, as well as machinists and metalworkers, also began falling victim to bladder cancer: aromatic amines had been added to rubbers and cutting oils to serve as accelerants and antirust agents.

--Sandra

Steingraber

, “Pesticides, Animals, and Humans”

Bullock, Richard and Maureen Daly Goggin.

The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings.

3

rd

ed., New York, 2013.

Slide4

Sentence Summary

Steingraber

explains that experiments with dogs demonstrated that aromatic amines, chemicals used in synthetic dyes, cutting oils, and

rubber, cause bladder cancer (976).Bullock, Richard and Maureen Daly Goggin.

The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings.

3

rd ed., New York, 2013.

Slide5

Summary in essay context

Medical researcher have long relied on experiments using animals to expand understanding of the causes of disease. For example, biologist and ecologist Sandra

Steingraber

notes that in the second half of the nineteenth century, the rate of bladder cancer soared among textile workers. According to Steingraber, experiments with dogs demonstrated that synthetic chemicals in dyes used to color the textiles caused the cancer (976).

Bullock, Richard and Maureen Daly Goggin.

The Norton Field Guide to Writing with Readings.

3

rd

ed., New York, 2013.

Slide6

Three Steps for a Summary

Step One:

In the first sentence, state the article’s main idea (the author’s claim or thesis); include the author (give his or her full name) and provide the title of the article (put the article title in quotation marks).

Spurlock, Ann C. et al. 

Guide to Freshman Composition

. 5th ed., Southlake, TX, Fountainhead Press, 2013. Mississippi State University

Slide7

Three Steps for a Summary

Step Two:

State the major supporting points, important definitions, facts, and statistics. Present these main points in their original order without distorting their emphasis or meaning; omit supporting details, examples, and repetition.

Spurlock, Ann C. et al. 

Guide to Freshman Composition

. 5th ed., Southlake, TX, Fountainhead Press, 2013. Mississippi State University

Slide8

Three Steps for a Summary

Step Three:

End with the author’s conclusions or recommendations.

Do not use direct quotations: rephrase in your own words. Don’t plagiarize.Do not use “I” or inject your own opinions.

Do

not

evaluate the article; just condense what the author states.

At the end of the summary, put the page numbers for the article in parentheses. Ex: (34-35) or (3) or (A1). Your period will follow these parentheses– (34-35)

. not

.

(34-35)

Spurlock, Ann C. et al. 

Guide to Freshman Composition

. 5th ed., Southlake, TX, Fountainhead Press, 2013. Mississippi State University

Slide9

Student Sample 1

“How to

S

urvive the First Year,” by Kelly Green, appeared in the Wall Street Journal (June 9, 2003). Based on dozens of responses from people around the country, Kelly reports that the first year of retirement is often difficult for unexpected reasons. Disorientation was a common feeling among many of the responses. Kelly suggests different ways to ease the adjustment process, from shifting personal attitudes and outlooks to modifying spending habits and the construction of social networks.

Spurlock, Ann C. et al. 

Guide to Freshman Composition

. 5th ed., Southlake, TX, Fountainhead Press, 2013. Mississippi State University

Slide10

Student Sample 1

Sentence Summary:

Kelly Green focuses on the problem of disorientation in the first year of retirement, then describes the adjustment retirees have made to solve the problem, including modification of personal attitudes and spending habits.

Spurlock, Ann C. et al. Guide to Freshman Composition. 5th ed., Southlake, TX, Fountainhead Press, 2013. Mississippi State University

Slide11

Student Sample 2

In “Reshaping Retirement Scenarios and Options” (

The Futurist

, 2004), Moynach and Worsley performed a two year study called, “The Tomorrow Project,” in which they analyzed the changing conditions of retirement. Based on interviews, consultations, and focus groups, they formulate new approaches for structuring individual retirement plans and state pension programs that will better serve the people of Great Britain.

Spurlock, Ann C. et al. 

Guide to Freshman Composition

. 5th ed., Southlake, TX, Fountainhead Press, 2013. Mississippi State University

Slide12

Student Sample 2

Sentence Summary:

“In the Tomorrow Project,”

Moynagh and Worsley formulate new approaches for structuring individual retirement plans (The Futurist, 2004).

Spurlock, Ann C. et al. 

Guide to Freshman Composition

. 5th ed., Southlake, TX, Fountainhead Press, 2013. Mississippi State University

Slide13

Templates to help with summarizing

She advocates

a radical revision of the juvenile justice system

.She advocates a _______________.They celebrate the fact that ____________.

_________, he admits.

Graff, Gerald, and Cathy

Birkenstein

. “The Art of Summarizing.” 

They Say/ I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing

, 3rd ed., W. W. Norton &Amp; Company, New York, 2014, pp. 39–40.

Slide14

Verbs for Introducing Summaries and Quotations

Verbs for Making a Claim

argue insist

assert observebelieve remind usclaim reportemphasize suggest

Graff, Gerald, and Cathy

Birkenstein

. “The Art of Summarizing.” They Say/ I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing, 3rd ed., W. W. Norton &Amp; Company, New York, 2014, pp. 39–40.

Slide15

Verbs for Introducing Summaries and Quotations

Verbs for Expressing Agreement

acknowledge endorse

admire extolagree praisecelebrate the fact that reaffirmcorroborate supportdo not deny verify

Graff, Gerald, and Cathy

Birkenstein

. “The Art of Summarizing.” They Say/ I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing

, 3rd ed., W. W. Norton &Amp; Company, New York, 2014, pp. 39–40.

Slide16

Verbs for Introducing Summaries and Quotations

Verbs for Questioning or Disagreeing

complain qualify

complicate questioncontend refutecontradict rejectdeny renouncedeplore the tendency to repudiate

Graff, Gerald, and Cathy

Birkenstein

. “The Art of Summarizing.” They Say/ I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing

, 3rd ed., W. W. Norton &Amp; Company, New York, 2014, pp. 39–40.

Slide17

Verbs for Introducing Summaries and Quotations

Verbs for Making Recommendations

advocate implore

call for pleaddemand recommendencourage urgeexhort warn

Graff, Gerald, and Cathy

Birkenstein

. “The Art of Summarizing.” They Say/ I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing, 3rd ed., W. W. Norton &Amp; Company, New York, 2014, pp. 39–40.

Slide18

Assignment

Go to

http://

www.nytimes.com/2002/11/23/opinion/don-t-blame-the-eater.html and print a copy of the article.Read the article several times and then on a piece of paper write down:The author’s name and title of the article

The article’s thesis (main claim)

List the author’s main points and then include a direct quote or paraphrase from the article to support the main point (making sure to list the paragraph number in parentheses afterwards.)

Then type up and 1 paragraph summary of the article, making sure it is completely in your own words.

At the end of the paragraph include the MLA citation for the article (use

EasyBib

—for a newspaper article printed online).

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