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Evening Concert


Series 20172018SeasonSara M Snell Music TheaterFriday December 1 730PMWest African Dance Drum EnsembleJulie Hunter directorMartin Kwaku Kwaakye Obeng guest instructor and artistAyelevi TraditionalKw

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Document on Subject : "Evening Concert"— Transcript:

1 Evening Concert Series
Evening Concert Series 2017 – 2018 Season Sara M. Snell Music Theater Frida y, December 1 , 7:30 PM West African Dance & Drum Ensemble Julie Hunter, director Martin Kwaku Kwaakye Obeng, guest instructor and artist Ayelevi Traditional Kwadzo Ku Traditional A t u mpan Drumming & Poetry Traditional Kpatsa Dance - Drumming Shayo Lee Kpatsa Le Samba Traditional Gahu Dance - Drumming Gahu Woe Loo Se Adzo Traditional Marimba Improvisation Kpanlogo Dance - Drumming ABC Calabash Song Ayelevi Salam Malekum Tsoo Boi Traditional Special Thanks: Dean Michael Sitton Martin Obeng Peter McCoy Erica Mensah Joseph Janover Emily Willis Kaylee Tasber Paul Mardy Karen Miller Sarah Burgess Lorelei Murdie Robert Zolner Lonel Woods Timothy Sullivan James Petercsak Robert Vadas Doyle Dean Manavi Deku Komi Deku Yaw Atiso Daniel Atiso Caron Collins Marsha Baxter Crane Student Association (CSA) The Center for Diversity Department of Music Theory/History/Composition Brown University Departm ent of Music Jason Hunter Linda and David Hunter Ensemble performers: Additional Guests: Austin Antle Nana Abena Baffour Akoto Matthew Bahr Ebenezer Akuffo Matthew Bruno Evelyn Clark Alexandra Coulibaly Narise Connor Joseph Demato - Garcia Brandon Griffin Ndeye Dieng Kady Konate Amandine Edwards Greg Otu Larbi Anthony Frimpong Jonell McCray Fauzia Ghatta Dicko Oumar Paulina Gyamerah Kwabena Poku Andrew Holcomb Joseph Janover Bri Jessmore Sean Kouznetsov Erica Mensah Jwuan Murphy - Rodriguez Justin Pannullo Matthew Schlicht Daniel Smith Rebecca Stacy Kaylee Tasber Emily Willis Kaitlyn Wilson Martin Kwaku Kwaakye Obeng has worked with the ensemble since its start in Spring 2013. He is a well - renowned drummer, composer, dancer, and educator originally from Ghana who has worked internationally for the pas

2 t 30 years. He began drumming at the ag
t 30 years. He began drumming at the age of five, and by seventeen he was appointed Royal Court Drummer to the high chief of the Aburi - Akuapim region of the Eastern Region of Ghana. He was a member of Ghana's National Arts Council Folkloric Company. He has continued to perform traditional music of West Africa, in addit ion to highlife, jazz, Latin music, reggae, and different fusions of these styles. Obeng teaches at Brown University, and has shared the stage with such luminaries as Max Roach, Roy Hargrove, Randy Weston, Anthony Braxton, Gideon Alorwoyie, and Obo Addy. His most recent recording titled Africa’s Moving Forward is available online at www.kwakukwaakyeobeng.bandcamp.com . To hear more of his music, and read about his work, please visit his website at www.kwakukwaakyeobeng.org , and follow him on facebook at www.facebook.com/KwakuKwaakyeObeng/ “Ayelevi” is a short song in call and response form which is set in the Ewe language. It is often performed as part of the Kpanlogo repertoire, though most kpanlogo songs are sung in Ga since the genre originated among the Ga ethnic group in southern Ghana. “Kwadzo Ku” is an agbadza song about a Monday - born male who ha s died at home. In West Africa , people are given day names based on the day of the week they are born. Agbadza is a type of Ewe war dance - drummi ng, which is typically performed in contemporary contexts at funerals. It first developed in the 1700s, and is the most common type of traditional music played today among the Ewe people of southeastern Ghana and southwestern Togo. The themes of songs to uch on heroism, leadership, bravery, war, and death. The instrumentation for this arrangement of the song includes the gankogui (iron double bell), axatse (gourd shaker), toke (boat - shaped bell), and sogo (lead drum). Atumpan Drumming & Poetry is unique in a number of ways. The atumpan is a pair of low - and high - pitched drums which originated with the Akan people in southern Ghana and is played in two main ways: the speech and dance modes. Today the atumpan is used by many other ethnic groups throughout this region of West Africa, such as the Ga, Ewe, and Dagbamba. The atumpan is capabl

3 e of communicating phrases of meaning th
e of communicating phrases of meaning through its imitation of the rhythms and tonal variations of the spoken Akan language. In this way, the atumpan literally “speaks”. For this reason, it is known as a talking drum. In this piece, the ensemble will recite phrases of Akan poetry, which will then be played on the atumpan in the speech mode. The text, shared below, honors the River Tano with many significant traditional phrases and proverbs. The transcription and translation come from the recording Rhythms of Life, Songs of Wisdom produced by Smithsonian Folkways. Poetry Honoring the River Tano Asuo twa okwan The river crosses the path Okwan twa asuo The path crosses the river Opani ne hwan? Which is the elder? Asuo twa okwan The river crosses the path Okwan twa asuo The path crosses the river Opani ne hwan? Which is the elder? Yeboo kwan no katoo asuo no The path was cut to meet the river Asuo no firi tete The river is of old Asuo no firi Odomankoma a oboo adee The river comes from “Odomankoma” the creator Konkon Tano Konkon Tano Brefa Tano Brefa Tano Asuo brekete Asuo brekete Agya Kwaa Ata ei! Father Kwaa Ata ei! Asu berempon The great river Asuo twa asuo River that passes a river Takasi berempon Takasi the Great Woama Bosompra adi afasee You have caused Bosompra to eat the wat er yam Me nam, me nam, me nam, ma si ta ko mu I have wandered, and wandered, and wandered, I have s tepped into the deep floods of Ta Takasi berempon Takasi the great Frampon damirifa Frampon, condolence Damirifa Condolence Damirifa Condolence Damirifa due Deepest condolence Damirifa due Deepest condolence Takasi berempon Takasi the great Frampon, damirifa Fram pon, condolence Damirifa Condolence Damirifa Condolence Damirifa due Deepest condolence Damirifa due Deepest condolence Damirifa due, due, due. Deepest, deepest, deepest condolences. Kpatsa is music and dance of the Ga - Adangme ethnic group of southern coastal Ghana, and is popular as a form of entertainment at funerals and festivals. It has historically been performed as a coming - of - age dance for girls

4 prior to marriage. It is said that th
prior to marriage. It is said that th is style of music originated among dwarfs, and that the off - kilter and low - to - the - ground dancing reflects the movements of dwarfs. Instrumentation includes nonota (iron double bell), toke (boat - shaped bell), shekeshe (gourd rattle), mi (lead hand drum), s ogo (low stick drum), kidi (medium stick drum), and kagan (high stick drum). Gahu , the second dance - drumming piece of the evening, is an Egun dance from Benin that was adopted by Ewe communities in Togo and Ghana in the early Twentieth C entury. The music is typically played at special events such as religious and harvest festivals, or for the installation of a chief. It is a social dance that reflects modern living and sensibilities in contemporary Africa. The lead drum, gboba , cues the dancers to change their movements. Instrumentation includes gankogui (iron double bell), toke (bo at - shaped bell), axatse (gourd rattle), sogo (large stick drum), kidi (medium stick drum), kagan (small stick drum) and gboba (large lead drum). Marimba Improvisation will feature Music Education major Joseph Janover playing kpanlogo melodies on the mari mba, and creatively improvising around them. Kpanlogo , the third dance - drumming piece of the night and last piece of the performance, is a type of Ga recreational genre from the capital city region of Accra in southern Ghana. It is typically played at funerals, festivals, and parties. It developed in the 1 950s during Ghana’s independence period. The song lyrics and dance movements embody the lifestyle of urban West African youth. The lead hand drum calls the dancers. Instrumentation includes mi (hand drums), nonota (double iron bell), shekeshe (gourd sha ker), dodompo (small iron bell), and tamalin (frame drums), and wooden clappers. In West African performance contexts in places such as Ghana, Togo, and Nigeria, audiences often acknowledge the exceptional dancing and music abilities of skilled artists by handing them money or placing it on their foreheads as they perform. This practice is known as dashing or spraying . The audience is encouraged to join us at the end for this dance, and clap and sing along, if so inspire