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HubbardstonWare River Nature ClubEast Quabbin Land TrustBEYOND THE HO


Decades of stressors have severely and adversely altered the health and numbers of pollinator populations Pollinators have beenimpacted by the loss degradation and fragmentation of habitat reduction i

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HubbardstonWare River Nature ClubEast Quabbin Land TrustBEYOND THE HO
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Document on Subject : "HubbardstonWare River Nature ClubEast Quabbin Land TrustBEYOND THE HO"— Transcript:

1 Hubbardston-Ware River Nature ClubEast Q
Hubbardston-Ware River Nature ClubEast Quabbin Land TrustBEYOND THE HONEY BEE:CONSERVING OUR VITAL NATIVE POLLINATORSSaturday May 2, 20158 a.m. €4:30 p.m.HARVARD FOREST PETERSHAM Decades of stressors have severely and adversely altered the health and numbers of pollinator populations. Pollinators have beenimpacted by the loss, degradation, and fragmentation of habitat, reduction in the number and quality of food sources, reduction in the availability of sites for breeding, nesting, and roosting, and improper use of pesticides and herbicides. In some casesthese stressors have made pollinator populations more susceptible to existing disease, predators, and parasites. . .‚Supporting the Health of Honey Bees and Other Pollinators,The Xerces Society, October 20, 2014 CONFERENCE SCHEDULE 7:45-8:15Sign-in/Registration8:20Welcome8:30HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT: RECOGNIZING OUR NATIVEPOLLINATORSGail Howe TrenholmThere are over 200,000 different species of animals in the world that act as pollinators. Of these about 1000 are vertebrates like birds, bats and small animals. The real work horses are the 199,000 invertebrates that achieve the majority of our crop pollination. Everyone knows about honey bees, but many people don€t know they are not native. The unsung heroes areour native bees, wasps, beetles, butterflies, moths, and even flies. Gail will provide an introduction and simple overview of the various characteristics of these families of insects with emphasis on the more important pollinators.9:40Keynote Presentation:CROWDSOURCING THE CAUSESAND CONSEQUENCES OF BUMBLEBEE DECLINEDr. Robert J. Gegear, Assistant Professor,Department of Biology and Biotechnology, Worcester Polytechnic InstituteRobwill discuss bumblebee ecology and behavior and focus on the issue ofbumblebee decline. He€ll explain how individuals, land managers, and farmers can he

2 lp research aimed at identifying major c
lp research aimed at identifying major causes of bumblebee decline. Habitatfactors that promote bumblebee species diversity will be addressed.10:50WHAT POLLINATORS DO WHEN THEY€RE NOT POLLINATINGCharley Eiseman, Freelance naturalist, authorFlowers are just one part of what pollinators need to survive. Charley will discuss the microhabitats and materials used by various types of native bees to make their nests and touch upon the life cycles of a number of non-bee flower visitors, including wasps, flies, beetles, butterflies, and moths.11:50NEONICOTINOIDS: ARE THEY HARMING THE BEES?Dr. Anne Averill, Professor of Entomology, Department of EnvironmentalConservation, University of Massachusetts--AmherstAnne will talk about thecurrent research findings on these controversial systemicinsecticides, risks associated with neonicotinoid treatments ofnursery and greenhouse stock, what remains to be investigated, and hownational and international programs areaddressing pollinator healthand safety.12:15LUNCH by Petersham Country Store (Included in conference fee)1:00PROVIDING POLLINATOR HABITAT IN YOUR BACKYARD OR FARMEllen Sousa, Author, educator, garden coachAs our landscape becomes increasingly developed, backyards and farms are a final frontier‚in providingessential habitat for declining pollinatorsthat play a vital role in environmental health. Ellen will coach us on easy ways to support pollinator populations in your own backyard, including how to attract the beneficial predatory insectsthat provide free pest control for vegetable gardens. A handoutlistingthe best plants for supporting pollinator diversity in southernNew England is included. 2:00-4:30CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS2:00-2:45BUTTERFLIES AS POLLINATORSGailHowe TrenholmThe role ofbutterflies; life cycle and identification of selected speciesBUMBLEBEE IDENTIFICATIONRob GegearRecognizing bumble be

3 es; life cycle information; citizen scie
es; life cycle information; citizen science research opportunities2:50-3:35NATIVE WOODY PLANTS THAT BENEFIT POLLINATORSEllen SousaSelection and growing habitsof treesand shrubs. IDENTIFYING AND MANAGING POLLINATOR HABITATON LARGE PROPERTIESTom Sullivan, M.A.L.D., Pollinators Welcome.comForest-edge and meadow bee habitat creation:management techniquesto arrestsuccession, create clearings and establish meadows with an eye toprovidingfloral and nesting opportunities for wood and ground nestingbees.3:40-4:30 DO I HAVE A DIVERSIFIED BEE COMMUNITY?Anne AverillHow to identify andappreciate themajor groups of important bee pollinators otherthan bumble bees,including Halictidae, Andrenidae, Megachilidae,Colletidae (sweat bees, mining bees, leaf cutter and mason bees).We€ll look at specimens under the microscope and get to knowthesebees up close .MOTHS AS POLLINATORSTom Murray & Brian KlassanosThe role of moths; life cycle and identificationof selectedspecies ABOUT THE SPEAKERSAnne Averillis a professor of entomology in the Department ofEnvironmental Conservation at the University of Massachusetts--Amherstwhere she conducts research on bee diversity and bumble bee health inmanaged and natural systems.CharleyEisemanis a freelance naturalistwho conducts plant, wildlife, and natural community surveys for various land trusts, universities, and state agencies. In his spare time, he studies plant-insect interactions, with a focus on leaf-miners and gall-makers. He is the lead author of the award-winning field guide, Tracks & Sign of Insects and Other Invertebrates(Stackpole Books, 2010) and also writes an insect-themed blog called BugTracks.Rob Gegearis Assistant Professor in the Department of Biology and Biotechnology at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, where his laboratory focuses on the study of pollinator neuroecology and conservation, with particul

4 ar emphasis on bumblebees and the monarc
ar emphasis on bumblebees and the monarch butterfly. In the past he also studied two other important pollinatorsƒhummingbirds and honey bees.Brian Klassanos„background is in landscaping and various agricultural enterprises. His property in Ware is filled with native plantings and his management practices encourage native butterflies and other beneficial insects. Recently he has become interested in moth photography and identification, and at certain times of the year he spends a lot of time on the moth photographers group website hosted by Mississippi StateUniversity.Tom Murrayis a naturalist and photographer with a special interest in insects. He is the author of Insects of New England & New York(Kollath-Stensaas, 2012), a handy field guide to over 1,250 distinctive and interesting insects. A regular contributor to BugGuide.net, Tom has collaboratedwith others to document previously-unknown distribution ranges for numerous insects as well as new regional records.Ellen Sousais a Spencer, MA…based author, speaker and garden coach specializing in habitat, landscaping and earth…friendly gardening. She teaches classes and workshops across New England for New England Wild Flower Society, NOFA and many other organizations, and isthe author of The Green Garden: A New England Guide to Planning, Planting and Maintaining the Eco€friendly Habitat Garden(Bunker Hill, 2011).Tom Sullivan, M.A.L.D, at Pollinators Welcome.com, is a sustainable landscape designer, land consultant, and educator with special focus on native bees. He gives workshops on the nesting, foraging and life cycles of native bee species in New England. Tom designed the first pollinator habitat nursery in Massachusetts at That„s A Plenty Farm in Hadley, where he maintains a presence and from which he holds workshops. A beekeeper in his youth, Tom switched his interest from honeybees

5 to natives in2008 after Colony Collapse
to natives in2008 after Colony Collapse Disorder emerged and as it became clear how intricately tied whole ecosystem health is to pollinator well-being and human survival. Gail Howe Trenholmis founder and director of Nature Visits, Inc. and has been educating children and adults about the wonders of the natural world for over 25 years. Herknowledge, enthusiasm and humor about a wide range of natural history topics is unequaled.As a Master Naturalist for MassAudubon for many years, Gail served as a resource for other natural history,conservation and education staff. She is also a trained facilitator in several national curricula such as Project Wet, Project Wild and Project Learning Tree, and is an authority on dragonfly and butterfly behavior and gardening for butterflies. REGISTRATION 1) Print & complete this form and send with check or money order to Hubbardston-Ware River Nature Club, P.O. Box 134, Hubbardston MA 01452OR2)Register on-line by providing the following information in an email message to hubbardstonnatureclub@yahoo.comand pay via PayPal(use email address to make payment).Name(s)________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Organization/business ________________________________________________________________________________Email address________________________________________________ ORMailing address______________________________________________________________________________________________Preferred telephone ___________________________________________Conference fee (throughApril 27th) $45.00Number of people_____@ 45.00Total ______Includes lunchConference fee after 4/27 50.00Number of people______ @50.00 Total ______Includes lu