Child Sexual Exploitation - Presentation

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Child Sexual Exploitation

Detective Inspector. Angie Chapman. NSPCC –The Story of Jay. Definition . of CSE. Children and . YP’s . under . 18 . involved in . exploitative. situations, contexts and relationships where they receive .

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Child Sexual Exploitation






Presentation on theme: "Child Sexual Exploitation"— Presentation transcript:

Slide1

Child Sexual Exploitation

Detective Inspector

Angie ChapmanSlide2

NSPCC –The Story of JaySlide3
Slide4
Slide5

Definition of CSE

Children and

YP’s under 18 involved in exploitative situations, contexts and relationships where they receive

something

(e.g., food, accommodation, drugs, alcohol, cigarettes,

affection, gifts, money) as a result of them being involved i

n

sexual activities.

Can occur using

technology

e.g.; persuaded to post images on the internet without immediate payment or gain.Violence, coercion and intimidation are common. Exploitative relationships where the child / YP has limited availability of choice, due to their social, economic or emotional vulnerability.Often the victim does not recognise the coercive nature of the relationship and does not see themselves as a victimSlide6

Categories of OffendingSlide7

Models of CSE

Methods used to sexually exploit children:Exploitation by

Family membersPeer-on-peer exploitation

Boyfriend model

Party model

Trafficking

Online

grooming

/

Sexting Slide8

In

2012 Barnardo's reported an increase in CSE by peers.

Young People were sexually exploiting other young people either directly

by sexually abusing victims themselves or

indirectly

by introducing children and young people to

abusers.

The Children's Commissioner Inquiry found that of

2,409

V

ictims

reported to them, 155 were also identified as Perpetrators of CSEAccording to the Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre (CEOP), perpetrators can use

1

victim to gain access to others,

e.g.

Asking victims

to bring their friends along

to pre-arranged meetings or 'parties'.

If victims try to break free, the perpetrator will use their peers to draw them back in.

Peer ExploitationSlide9

Boyfriend ModelSlide10

Child sexual abuse online

When sexual exploitation happens online, young people may be persuaded, or forced, to:

send or post

sexually explicit images

of themselves

take part in

sexual activities via a webcam

or smartphone

have

sexual conversations

by text or online.

Abusers may

threaten to send images

, video or copies of conversations to the young person's friends and family unless they take part in other sexual activity.Images or videos may continue to be shared long after the sexual abuse has stopped.Slide11

Online GroomingVictim:

Breck BEDNAR, 14 yrsVictim started communicating with Abuser on gaming website

They played games and chatted through TeamspeakVictim’s personality changedVictim went from Surrey to Abuser’s home in Essex

Abuser

: Lewis DAYNES, 19

yrs

Abuser spent many months building up online relationships with vulnerable teenage boys

Lured Victim to his home address

Tied Victim up with duct tape, sexually assaulted him, and killed him.

Attempted to destroy technical devicesSlide12

Methods of CoercionSlide13

‘PUSH’

FACTORSBeing bullied or threatened

Drug/alcohol use within the family or by YPBeing let down by ’trusted’ adults Lack of friends/peer relationshipsLiving with Domestic Abuse

Homeless/sofa surfing

Sibling difficulties (older sibling involved in CSE)

Associating with older adults

Being alienated from family or community

Children in Care

Friendships/living with other young people that are victims of CSE

Offending behaviour/criminality

Mental Health issues

History of previous abuse

History of previous CSE

Peer violenceSlide14

‘PULL’ FACTORS

Meeting someone who thinks they are specialBeing taken to clubs and adult venuesReceiving alcohol, drugs, money or gifts of any description

Being part of an alternative scene, e.g. criminal gang or music scene (belonging)Being liked and fancied/receiving affection

Being offered somewhere to stay where there are no rules

Being taken to clubs, adult venues

Being given lifts, taken to new places and having new adventures

Getting a buzz and the excitement of doing something risky or forbidden (encouraged by the abuser)Slide15

Child Sexual Exploitation Unit 01622 652886Operation Willow

Call 101Say Something Helpline116 000