How to ask questions effectively

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College Prep I. CLOSED QUESTIONS. A closed question usually receives a single word or very short, factual answer. . "Are . you thirsty?" The answer is "Yes" or ". No“. ". Where do you live?" The answer is generally the name of your town or your address. ID: 746485 Download Presentation

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How to ask questions effectively




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How to ask questions effectively

College Prep I

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CLOSED QUESTIONS

A closed question usually receives a single word or very short, factual answer.

"Are

you thirsty?" The answer is "Yes" or "No“"Where do you live?" The answer is generally the name of your town or your address.“Do you have any pets?”

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Closed questions

Closed questions are good for:

Testing your understanding, or the other person's: "So, if I get this qualification, I will get a raise?"

Concluding a discussion or making a decision: "Now we know the facts, are we all agreed this is the right course of action?"Frame setting: "Are you happy with the service from your bank?"

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Open questions

Open questions elicit longer answers.

They

usually begin with what, why, how. asks the respondent for his or her knowledge, opinion or feelings."Tell me" and "describe" can also be used in the same way as open questions.

What happened at the party?Why did he react that way?How was the class?Tell me what happened next.Describe the circumstances in more detail.

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Open questions

Open questions are good for:

Developing an open conversation: "What did you

do on vacation?" Finding out more detail: “is there something special about this event?"Finding out the other person's opinion or issues: "What do you think about those changes?"

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Write

Write a closed question you might ask to clarify your understanding of something.

Write an open question you may use to figure out someone’s opinion of something.

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Funnel questions

This

technique involves starting with general questions, and then homing in on a point in each answer, and asking more and more detail at each level.

"How many people were involved in the fight?" "About ten." "

Were they kids or adults?" "Mostly kids." "What sort of ages were they?" "About fourteen or fifteen." "Were any of them wearing anything distinctive?" "Yes, several of them had red baseball caps on." "Can you remember if there was a logo on any of the caps?" "Now you come to mention it, yes, I remember seeing a big letter N."

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Funnel questions

Funnel questions are good for:

Finding out more detail about a specific point: "Tell me more about Option 2."

Gaining the interest or increasing the confidence of the person you're speaking with: "Have you used the helpdesk?", "Did they solve your problem?", "What was the attitude of the person who took your call?"

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Probing Questions

This is

another strategy for finding out more detail.

This can be as simple as asking for an example. “I don’t understand. Could you give me an example of what you’re referring to?At other times, you need additional information for

clarification."When do you need this assignment by, and do you want to see a draft before I give you my final version?“You may need to investigate whether there is proof for what has been said "How do you know that she doesn’t like you?"

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Probing questions

Probing questions are good for:

Gaining clarification to ensure you have the whole story and that you understand it thoroughly.

Drawing information out of people who are trying to avoid telling you something.

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Leading questions

What do each of the following questions assume?

"

How late do you think that the project will deliver?“ "Lori's very efficient, don't you think?" "Shall we all approve Option 2?" vs. "Do you want to approve

option 2 or not?“ "Would you like me to go ahead with Option 2?" vs. "Shall I choose Option 2?".

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What questions you ask?

Name: Miguel

Age: 36

Location: Porto

Occupation: Bike shop ownerList:The picture you gave me and the leather box we found together.Mom and dads old camera and mom and dads old leather bag.

The shoes I can’t live without.Your smell #1 and your smell #2.

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What would you ask?

Name

: Joshua Lee Bacon

Age: 20Location: Boone,

IowaOccupation: StudentList:Favorite pants.Favorite underwear.iPhone.Box full of all my prints and negatives.Buffalo box full of treasures and special snapshots.Passport.Chinese cigars.Some cash.Photo of my grandparents.Photo of a friend. Field notes and pens.Vivitar and telephoto lens.I would want to take more records, but the first one I would grab would be this Envy Corps 7 inch.Some old letters.Wallet.

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Ask some questions! What is my story?

Name: Amy Venneman

Age: 40

Location: st. Peters, mooccupation: english teacher

List:My dogsMy photo albumsMy purse (credit cards, id, phone)Home moviesThe unity sand from my weddingAnd, as I’ve learned, everything else can be replaced.

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Your turn!

Get in partners.

Read each other’s lists.

Ask probing questions.Take notes as you listen.Get his/her story!

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Vignette

noun

\vin-ˈyet, vēn-\ "Vignette" is a word that originally meant "something that may be written on a vine-leaf." It’s a snapshot in words.

It differs from flash fiction or a short story in that its aim doesn’t lie within the traditional realms of structure or plot. Instead, the vignette focuses on one element, mood, character, setting or object. It's descriptive, excellent for character or theme exploration and wordplay. Through a vignette, you create an atmosphere.

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The vignette

The language can be simple and minimalistic, or extravagantly crafted literary prose. It’s your choice.

Write

in the style and genre you are comfortable with and in the genre you love. There are no limits regarding style and genre. In fact, the vignette only has one rule: create an atmosphere, not a story.Set your mind on a moment. Use all the senses to describe it.


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