Read , understand and respond to texts. Students should be able - PowerPoint Presentation

Read , understand and respond to texts. Students should be able
Read , understand and respond to texts. Students should be able

Read , understand and respond to texts. Students should be able - Description


Read understand and respond to texts Students should be able to maintain a critical style and develop an informed personal response use textual references including quotations to support and illustrate interpretations ID: 769559 Download Presentation

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Read, understand and respond to texts. Students should be able to:maintain a critical style and develop an informed personal responseuse textual references, including quotations, to support and illustrate interpretations. AO1 (37.5%) AO2 (42.5%) Analyse the language, form and structure used by a writer to create meanings and effects, using relevant subject terminology where appropriate. AO3 (15%) Show understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written.

Homework Create a revision display for My Last Duchess: Key structural features usedKey language featuresFeatures of formImagery Due in: Monday 20th February

Overview: ‘Generally’, ‘On the whole’, ‘Overall’ . (Make a summative comment about the poem: What is the overall meaning or message?) Paragraph 1:One piece of evidence from the beginning of the poem with inferences – TEA Paragraph 2: Two or three pieces of evidence from the middle of the poem with inferences - TEA Paragraph 3: One piece of evidence from the end of the poem with inferences - TEANO VAGUE COMMENTS Overview: ‘Generally’, ‘On the whole’, ‘Overall’ ‘There is a sense that’ or ‘The writer tries to...’ (Make a summative comment about the poem: What is the main point of view or message?) Make this overview different to your first. Paragraph 4: Comment on the structure and form of the poem if you haven’t already. Use this framework to write about a poem in an organised way.

TerminologyEvidence Analyse

Robert BrowningRobert Browning  (1812-1889) was known for his dark humour in his poems. Browning was interested in the repression of the Victorian era, and the true, darker side of human behaviour. He is best known for his use of the dramatic monologue. My Last Duchess is an example of this and it also reflects Browning's love of history and European culture as the story is loosely based on the life of an Italian Duke from the sixteenth century – Alfonso II d’Este. AO3Show understanding of the relationships between texts and the contexts in which they were written.

My Last DuchessTHINK: What does this title suggest? TASK: Write it in your book and annotate the connotations.

Understanding ‘My Last Duchess’L/O: To understand and interpret the poem. What does the title of the poem suggest?

How would you describe the Duke? (3 adjectives)http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZxq3r7TlHohttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53zCCVFN2yI&safe=active

Understanding ‘My Last Duchess’L/O: To understand and interpret the poem. What does the title of the poem suggest? LITERARY TERMS Dramatic Monologue – a poem in the form of a speech or narrative by an imagined person, in which the speaker inadvertently reveals aspects of their character while describing a particular situation or series of events. Speaker – the ‘voice’ that is speaking in a poem written in the first person.

QuestionsWho is the Duke of Ferrara talking to in the poem?Why is his guest visiting the Duke of Ferrara? Who painted the picture of the Duke’s late wife?The Duke was not entirely pleased with his late wife, the Last Duchess. Explain why and what he did about it.What impression of the Last Duchess do you get from the poem? AO1 AO2

‘My Last Duchess’Loosely based on Duke Alfonso II of Ferrara.Married Lucrezia de’Medici (she was 15).She died 2 years later under suspicious circumstances...The poem is set 3 years later (in 1564).The Duke is speaking to an emissary from the Count of Tyrol (the father of the Duke’s new fiancé). AO3

‘My Last Duchess’ – ThemesGroup the quotations from the poem under different themes. THINK and NOTE DOWN: What are the themes of the poem? How is the Duke presented?

That’s my last Duchess painted on the wall,Looking as if she were alive. (1-2)  Will’t please you sit and look on her? (5)    none puts byThe curtain I have drawn for you, but I (9-10)   Sir, ‘twas not Her husband’s presence only, called that spotOf joy into the Duchess’ cheek (14-16)   she rankedMy gift of a nine-hundred-years-old nameWith anybody’s gift (32-34) She had A heart – how shall I say? – too soon made glad, Too easily impressed; she liked whate’er She looked on, and her looks went everywhere. (21-24)     Oh Sir, she smiled, no doubt, Whene’er I passed her; but who passed without Much the same smile? (43-45)     I gave commands; Then all smiles stopped together. (45-46)     his fair daughter’s self, as I avowed At starting, is my object. (52-53)

Write an overall summaryRobert Browning’s dramatic monologue, My Last Duchess, explores the ideas of… What are the key details behind the story? What elements of power and conflict are evident? When is the poem set and why might this be significant?What does the poem reveal to us?

Annotate the poemAnnotate... Sections of the poem that show the Duke to be controlling.Sections of the poem to do with art and appearance. GLOSSARY (make a note of these)‘mantle’ – a woman’s cloak‘countenance’ – a face, appearance.‘Fra Pandolf’ – a famous artist/painter – made up by Browning. ‘mule’ – a kind of donkey (crossed with a horse).‘munificence’ – generosity. Annotate... Form and Structure – how is it structured? Rhymes? Sentence length? Punctuation? Devices (enjambment, caesura, etc ) – How do these link to or support idea of power/conflict? Language – types of words used. Devices. The images these create. How do these link to or portray the idea of power/conflict? Imagery – What images are created? What do they mean? What connotations do they hold? How do they suggest or link to power/ conflict?

My Last DuchessThat's my last Duchess painted on the wall,Looking as if she were alive. I callThat piece a wonder, now: Fra Pandolf's handsWorked busily a day, and there she stands.Will 't please you to sit and look at her? I said "Fra Pandolf" by design, for never readStrangers like you that pictured countenance,The depth and passion of its earnest glance,But to my self they turned (since none puts byThe curtain I have drawn for you, but I) And seemed as they would ask me, if they durst,How such a glance came there; so, not the firstAre you to turn and ask thus. Sir, 't was notHer husband's presence only, called that spotOf joy into the Duchess' cheek: perhaps Dramatic monologue The Duke is very possessive There is a reason for drawing the curtain, it’s so the person can see his prized possession An imaginary artist, name dropping: everything has monetary value He likes beautiful things

Fra Pandolf chanced to say, "Her mantle lapsOver my lady's wrist too much," or "PaintMust never hope to reproduce the faintHalf-flush that dies along her throat:" such stuffWas courtesy, she thought, and cause enoughFor calling up that spot of joy. She had A heart--how shall I say?--too soon made glad,Too easily impressed: she liked whate'erShe looked on, and her looks went everywhere.Sir, 't was all one! My favor at her breast,The bough of cherries some officious fool Broke in the orchard for her, the white muleShe rode with round the terrace--all and eachWould draw from her alike the approving speech,Or blush, at least. She thanked men,--good! but thankedSomehow,--I know not how--as if she rankedMy gift of a nine-hundred-years-old name The Duke’s jealousy; he starts to reveal more than he planned Her only crime was enjoying life and not respecting his rank/title Contrast: genuine romance or a posh title, he expects her to value the latter more His only pride is in his wealthy family name She was a modest person who got embarrassed by compliments

With anybody's gift. Who'd stoop to blameThis sort of trifling? Even had you skillIn speech--(which I have not)--to make your willQuite clear to such an one, and say, "Just thisOr that in you disgusts me; here you miss,Or there exceed the mark"--and if she let Herself be lessoned so, nor plainly setHer wits to yours, forsooth, and made excuse,--E'en then would be some stooping; and I chooseNever to stoop. Oh sir, she smiled, no doubt,Whene'er I passed her; but who passed without Much the same smile? This grew; I gave commands;Then all smiles stopped together. There she standsAs if alive. Will 't please you rise? We'll meetThe company below, then. I repeat, He accidentally reveals more of his weaknesses HE KILLED HER? Makes monologue feel like conversation He is getting jealous over her being kind What kind of man expects his wife to be rude like this?

The Count your master's known munificenceIs ample warrant that no just pretenceOf mine for dowry will be disallowed;Though his fair daughter's self, as I avowedAt starting, is my object. Nay, we'll goTogether down, sir. Notice Neptune, though, Taming a sea-horse, thought a rarity,Which Claus of Innsbruck cast in bronze for me!Robert Browning (1812-1889) He is talking to an emissary of his future wife’s father Money for marrying his daughter And a beautiful wife to boot He returns to material things; all his money and power will never buy him love though young woman's "faults" were qualities like compassion, modesty, humility, delight in simple pleasures, and courtesy to those who served her. The Duke doesn’t realise how much of himself he has given away in his criticism of his former wife

The Duke gives away his attitude towards his wife with each comment he makes. Match up the words that describe his attitude with the appropriate quotation and meaning in the table. Duke’s attitudeQuotationMeaning Proud‘That’s my last duchess painted on the wall’ I am the owner of the portrait and the person who controls when it is viewed. Controlling‘since none puts by/The curtain I have drawn for you, but I’ She belongs to me, and her fate could be considered a warning to other women who don’t give me total respect. Disdainful ‘She thanked men,-good!’ It is appropriate to be polite, but certainly not to treat all people equally. Refuses to explain himself or compromise ‘ E’en then would be some stooping; and I choose/Never to stoop.’ It is beneath me to explain myself or ask others to change their ways. They should already know how to behave. Authoritarian and rather frightening ‘I gave commands; /Then all smiles stopped together.’ I have supreme control and my orders are carried out. I do not need to undertake any unpleasant task – I have servants to do that for me.

Form and StructureL/O: To be able to relate the speaker’s personality to the form of the poem. How does the Duke speak ?(use your imagination to flesh out the character) At length His voice is… He sounds… He talks about…

Metre in ‘My Last Duchess’‘That’s my last Duchess painted on the wall’ How many syllables?What is the metre? KEY WORDS:metre – The rhythmic pattern or structure of a line.iamb – A metrical ‘foot’ that consists of two syllables, one unstressed, one stressed (da-DUM). iambic Pentameter – A line of 5 iambs (da-DUM da-DUM da-DUM da-DUM da-DUM).

Aspects of structure and rhythmExplain the effect of each of the features of structure and rhythm in ‘My Last Duchess.’It’s long Iambic pentameterFrequent caesuraeVaried punctuationRhyming coupletsDramatic monologue

How does the poem’s form and structure reflect the Duke’s state of mind?

How is the Duke’s relationship with the Duchess presented in the poem?Write two detailed paragraphs. Analyse the language of the poem in depth.Use several quotations. Focus in on specific words/phrases.Use literary terminology (technical language).Literary TerminologyPossessive pronoun (‘my’) Rhetorical QuestionPatronising/superior tone CONNECTIVESAdd more information:Moreover,Furthermore, In addition, Compare: Conversely, On the other hand, Similarly, However,

Robert Browning – My Last DuchessFERRARAThat’s my last Duchess painted on the wall, Looking as if she were alive. I callThat piece a wonder, now; Fra Pandolf’s handsWorked busily a day, and there she stands.Will’t please you sit and look at her? I said“Fra Pandolf” by design, for never readStrangers like you that pictured countenance,The depth and passion of its earnest glance,But to myself they turned (since none puts byThe curtain I have drawn for you, but I)And seemed as they would ask me, if they durst , How such a glance came there; so, not the first Are you to turn and ask thus. Sir, ’twas not Her husband’s presence only, called that spot Of joy into the Duchess’ cheek; perhaps Fra Pandolf chanced to say, “Her mantle laps Over my lady’s wrist too much,” or “Paint Must never hope to reproduce the faint Half-flush that dies along her throat.” Such stuff Was courtesy, she thought, and cause enough For calling up that spot of joy. She had A heart—how shall I say?— too soon made glad, Too easily impressed; she liked whate’er She looked on, and her looks went everywhere.

Sir, ’twas all one! My favour at her breast,The dropping of the daylight in the West,The bough of cherries some officious foolBroke in the orchard for her, the white muleShe rode with round the terrace—all and each Would draw from her alike the approving speech,Or blush, at least. She thanked men—good! but thankedSomehow—I know not how—as if she rankedMy gift of a nine-hundred-years-old name With anybody’s gift. Who’d stoop to blameThis sort of trifling? Even had you skillIn speech—which I have not—to make your willQuite clear to such an one, and say, “Just thisOr that in you disgusts me; here you miss,Or there exceed the mark”—and if she let Herself be lessoned so, nor plainly setHer wits to yours, forsooth, and made excuse—E’en then would be some stooping; and I choose Never to stoop. Oh, sir, she smiled, no doubt, Whene’er I passed her; but who passed without Much the same smile? This grew; I gave commands; Then all smiles stopped together. There she stands As if alive. Will’t please you rise? We’ll meet The company below, then. I repeat, The Count your master’s known munificence Is ample warrant that no just pretense Of mine for dowry will be disallowed; Though his fair daughter’s self, as I avowed At starting, is my object. Nay, we’ll go Together down, sir. Notice Neptune, though, Taming a sea-horse, thought a rarity, Which Claus of Innsbruck cast in bronze for me!  

This is one of Browning's best known dramatic monologues.The poem is written in iambic pentameter and in rhyming couplets. This is one long speech, pretending to be a conversation. It is divided up into rhyming couplets but to mimic unrehearsed speech there are lots of twists and turns within the lines, shown by a variety of punctuation (colons and lots of dashes as well as the usual commas and full stops). Form and Structure

Go a step further and give a personal response Have a go at answering these questions to help you come up with your own ideas about the poem: Q1. Why do we learn about the Duke’s actions from his own mouth?Q2. Why does the poem end with the Duke describing another piece of art?Q3. Effects of conflict, reality of war ... ‘Poppies’, ‘Remains’ and ‘War Photographer’ are all good poems to look at alongside this one if you’re thinking about the effects of conflict. ‘Bayonet Charge’ and ‘Exposure’ work well for the reality of war. KEY THEMES

AO3 Poem 1: Poem 2:

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