Connect your learning Can you name any of the ocean currents? - PowerPoint Presentation

Connect your learning Can you name any of the ocean currents?
Connect your learning Can you name any of the ocean currents?

Connect your learning Can you name any of the ocean currents? - Description


Are there any patterns on the wind direction animation Using evidence from the Sea Surface Temperature and Wind Speed map can you say why we get ocean currents Ocean currents and sea surface temperature ID: 936034 Download Presentation

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Presentation on theme: "Connect your learning Can you name any of the ocean currents?"— Presentation transcript


Slide1

Connect your learning

Can you name any of the ocean currents? Are there any patterns on the wind direction animation?Using evidence from the Sea Surface Temperature and Wind Speed map can you say why we get ocean currents?

Ocean currents and sea surface temperature from https://earth.nullschool.net on 23rd May 2020

Surface wind speed map for the 23rd May 2020 from http://earth.nullschool.net

Slide2

What am I?

Hold up your whiteboard with your guessYou’ll know I’m coming up to a week before I arrive

I have many names, but you’ve probably never met meEventually I will slow down and disappearI can destroy most thingsI’m a killer; I can crush you, drown you, and make you sickI can be hundreds of miles acrossI can be more powerful than a nuclear bomb

I’m powered by the SunI only have one eye

Slide3

I’m a Tropical Cyclone

(also known as a typhoon or hurricane)

Describe the satellite image – what do you see?

Hurricane Maria, 2017. About 900 miles across.

Slide4

Tropical Cyclones

Slide5

Tropical cyclones

ObjectivesTo understand what weather and hazards are associated with a Tropical CycloneTo be able to describe the structure of a Tropical cyclone

To be able to explain how and why Tropical cyclones formOutcomes

Completed answers to questions on a video about Hurricane DorianA diagram of a tropical cycloneExplained annotations on your diagram of a tropical cyclone

Slide6

What are Tropical Cyclones?

Slide7

What are the Impacts of Tropical Cyclones?

Describe the weather during Hurricane Dorian – a tropical cyclone.Describe the effects of this tropical cyclone on

people and the environmenthttps://youtu.be/T-jEj8Bh5Kc

Slide8

500 to 2000km

About12KM

Anvil of

clouds

bands

Warm upwelling air

Cooler sinking air

Spiral of fastest winds around the

Spiral bands of

Cross section through a tropical cyclone

Line of cross section

WORD BOX

thunderstorms Cumulonimbus Rain

26°C+ Eye wind

Low

shear

Warm Ocean Water

Complete the diagram below by adding each word from the box into the gaps

Slide9

500 to 2000km

EYE

About12KM

Anvil of

CUMULONIMBUS

clouds

RAIN

bands

Warm upwelling air

Cooler sinking air

Spiral of fastest winds around the

EYE WALL

Spiral bands of

THUNDERSTORMS

Cross section through a tropical cyclone

Line of cross section

Low

WIND

shear

Warm Ocean Water

26°C+

Slide10

Where do TROPICAL CYCLONES occur?

Slide11

Tropical Cyclone

s (hurricanes, typhoons) develop as a result of particular physical conditions.Map from memory exercise – Tropical cyclone location. You are in groups of 3, you will get to come to the front of the class and look at the picture for 30 seconds, then go back to your table to reproduce what you saw

5 goes a teamOnce finished;Describe the location of Tropical cyclones

Slide12

NORTH AMERICA

EUROPE

AFRICA

SOUTH AMERICA

ASIA

AUSTRALASIA

13

26

9

2

9

7

9

TROPIC OF CANCER (23.5°N)

TROPIC OF CAPRICORN (23.5°S)

EQUATOR

Map of major Tropical Cyclones

KEY

Sea temperatures go above 26°C

Direction of cyclone movement

9

Hurricane Dorian

9

Typhoon Haiyan

HURRICANES

CYCLONES

TYPHOONS

Average number of cyclones a year

HURRICANES

Local basin name for tropical cyclones

Slide13

This map shows the tracks of all tropical cyclones which formed worldwide from 1985 to 2005.

Background image: NASA this version:

Nilfanion

/ Public domain

70

°N

60

°N

50

°N

40

°N

30

°N

20

°N

10

°N

0

°

10

°S

20

°S

30

°S40°S50°S5°N5°SWhich areas get the most tropical cyclones?Look carefully between 5°N and 5°S – what do you notice?

Slide14

Describe the location of Tropical cyclones

USEFUL SENTENCE STARTERS - Tropical cyclones are found...Most Tropical cyclones occur in.....The least Tropical cyclones occur.....

Many Tropical cyclones occur at the latitudes of.....There are no Tropical cyclones.....Tropical cyclones are called …The countries most affected by Tropical cyclones are…This second map shows that we do not get Tropical cyclones between the latitudes of…

Slide15

Skills exercise:

Using GIS to plot tropical cyclone dataUse the Hurricane Dorian Excel data to plot the track of this Hurricane. There is an instructional video opposite to help you.Select all of the data in the table

Click on “3D maps”Click on “new tour”Click on “Flat map”Click on “add field” in “Height” on the right hand menu and add the wind speed data (mph)Change the graph type to a “heat map”

Slide16

How do TROPICAL CYCLONES form?

Slide17

Tropical Cyclones

Take notes on https://youtu.be/Ik2GPo6-AvY Add some extra annotations to your cross section of a tropical cyclone diagram to explain how they form – the next slide will help too.

Slide18

500 to 2000km

Line of cross section

1.

The sun sends incoming solar radiation to Earth which warms our oceans

2.

This warms the oceans to a critical 26°C

3.

This causes warm MOIST air to rise through the air

4.

This air cools as it rises, causing condensation to occur and clouds to form

5.

Some cooled air sinks back down helping to create the EYE

6.

Air rushes in from outside the cyclone creating winds

7.

The whole cyclone rotates because of the Earth’s spin

Slide19

Storm surge

: A rise in sea level due to the low pressure and winds pushing water onshore. In 1899’s Cyclone

Mahina

the storm surge was 14.5m. Hurricane Katrina caused a 7.7 to 8.5m storm surge in 2005

Extreme rainfall

: Tropical Cyclone Hyacinthe was associated with over 6m of rainfall. Hurricane Harvey dumped 1.53m of rainfall on Texas in 2017.

High winds

: The 1924 Cuba hurricane had wind speeds of 165 miles per hour. Hurricane Laura in 2020 hit 150 miles per hour

Key Impacts of Tropical Cyclones

Slide20

We can prepare for Tropical Cyclones!

Is there enough detail on the poster below?Could anything else be included?

https://www.weather.gov/safety/hurricane-plan

Slide21

Review – True or false?1-10 in the back of your books

5 seconds thinking time per questionIf a storm isn’t spinning, it can’t be a tropical cycloneA tropical cyclone will always have a name

A tropical cyclone can form over landThe name for hot air rising is ‘convection’.A tropical cyclone will have winds of at least 74mph.A tropical cyclone can only form over water that is 20oC or warmer

A tropical cyclone would spin clockwise in the North AtlanticA tropical cyclone could form in the Arctic OceanA tropical cyclone near Japan would be called a hurricane.

Tropical cyclones can happen in any month of the year

True

True

False

True

True

False

7. False

8. False

9. False

10. True

<5 The leaves barely rustle

6-8 Getting pretty breezy

9+ Blown away!

OR

https://quizlet.com/_8y59ir?x=1jqt&i=38anvz

Slide22

Tropical Storms and

c

limat

e chang

e

1850

2018

1900

1950

2000

In a warming world what will the consequences be for people living in areas that suffer tropical cyclones?

Slide23

Thunk

Question

Thunk question“A Thunk question is a…simple-looking question about everyday things that stops you in your tracks and helps you start to look at the world in a whole new light.” https://www.independentthinking.co.uk/thunks/ n.b. Thunk in this sense is not an official word in the Cambridge English Dictionary!

Does the sky weigh more on a cloudy day?

Slide24

Further resources

This lesson was designed to give key stage 3 students a “taster” or introduction to Tropical Cyclones – there are a huge amount of great resources and lesson idea here - https://www.metlink.org/

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