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Slide1

9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.

Getting started

Massimo

9:45 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

Grant writing hints and tips

Maria

10:15 a.m. – 10.45 a.m.

A reviewer’s perspective

Massimo

10:45 a.m. – 11:00a.m.

Break

11:00a.m. – 11:45a.m.

Personal experiences:

Ben

, Emma, Mandy, Sam

11:45 a.m. – 12.30 p.m.

DiscussionSlide2

CVR

Postdoc Prize

Purpose

:

To

offer the CVR

postdoc

community the opportunity to secure a small grant

to support

the pursuit of an independent project, and to gain experience of preparing and defending a grant proposal.

Timeline:

13

th

May

MRC

funding presentation from Dr

Ghada

Zoubiane

(MRC Head

Office

)

6

th

August

‘Grants Workshop’

8

th

September

Submissions

due

October

Shortlisted

applicants present to the assessment panel and

awards announced

November

Feedback

to all applicants

Budget:

Project

budget should be in the region of £3kSlide3

CVR

Postdoc Prize

Assessment

criteria:

Innovative project that takes current work to a decisive point, or explores a

new avenue

arising from an ongoing project;

Potential

to enhance the applicant’s personal career development by developing their vision, awareness and expert skills;

The

project has the full support and approval of the applicant’s supervisor.

Assessment

panel:

Scientific Advisory sub-group: Massimo

Palmarini

, John

McLauchlan

, Jim Neil, Roman

Biek

, Richard Elliott, Alain KohlSlide4

Grantsmanship

Hints & Tips

Maria McPhillipsSlide5

Grantsmanship

The

art of acquiring peer-reviewed research funding

Great

grantsmanship

can’t elevate unexceptional science, but poor

grantsmanship can make an exciting project unfundableThere is no magic formula, grant writing is a learned skillBut there are some general ‘do’s and don'ts’ that are worth keeping in mindWriting a good grant takes (lots of

) timeSlide6

The building blocks of a successful application

Person

- An excellent CV + publication record

for your career stage

Place

-

A vibrant environment with excellent

facilities and respected

sponsors/mentors

Project

-

An achievable, high quality project

addressing an important research question

P

P

P

PreparationSlide7

Laying the groundwork

Familiarise yourself

(

now

) with

the eligibility criteria and deadlines of the funders you’re interested in

Aim to be at your most competitive at the time of application – get current work published/acceptedTalk to others who have been through the process, both as applicants and reviewersUnderstand the remit and priorities of each funder - you’ll need to align your research plan accordinglyGenerate preliminary dataInitiate partnerships with collaboratorsWrite your ‘one pager’ outlineGet involved in grant reviewing if possibleSlide8

Getting started with an application

Give yourself plenty of time

Read all instructions very carefully and follow them to the letter – font type and size, margins, word count, page limits etc

Read successful and unsuccessful applications

Think about the sections first read by a reviewer e.g. title and abstract – this should be a stand alone, succinct and accurate description of the proposal - but it should be the last section you complete.

Academic impact and economic and societal impactSlide9

Person

A strong background, solid training and extensive knowledge of the research topic

Demonstratable

potential as a career scientist – publications...

Show how this fellowship is important to advance your career. What are your future plans? How does this fellowship help?

Clear ‘ownership’ of the proposal, taken the lead in its development, carving a research nicheSlide10

Project

What is the question? Why is it important?

Novel, interesting, timely

High scientific merit – hypothesis driven

Mix of risk and safe bets

Ambitious – but feasible, within the timeframe & budgetSlide11

Research Plan

Hold the reviewers by the hand – don’t make them have to work

too hard

Think about the look and flow of the document – use headings, sub-sections, figures etc

Communicate with all members of the review panel

Explain your ‘Plan B’ – don’t base everything

on the success of Aim 1Include a realistic timetable – who will do what, when (& where)Reference accuratelyProof read and spell checkSlide12

Questions to ask yourself

Steps to take

Key elements of each step

What is the problem and why should it be studied?

Selection, analysis and statement of the research question

Identify the problems

Prioritising the problems

Analysis of the issues

Justification for studies

What information is already available?

Literature review

Published literature

Databases

Prelim data

Why do you want to carry out the research and what do you hope to achieve?

Formulation of research objectives

General aims

Specific objectives

Hypotheses to be tested

What additional data do you need to meet your research objectives? How are you going to collect this information?

Research methodology or study design

Type of study

Variables

Data collection technique

Sampling

Plan for data collection

Data processing and analysis

Ethical issues

Preliminary data or pilot study

Safety issues

Additional training,

if required

CollaboratorsSlide13

Questions to ask yourself

Steps to take

Key elements of each step

What is the problem and why should it be studied?

Selection, analysis and statement of the research question

Identify the problems

Prioritising the problems

Analysis of the issues

Justification for studies

What information is already available?

Literature review

Published literature

Databases

Prelim data

Why do you want to carry out the research and what do you hope to achieve?

Formulation of research objectives

General aims

Specific objectives

Hypotheses to be tested

What additional data do you need to meet your research objectives? How are you going to collect this information?

Research methodology or study design

Type of study

Variables

Data collection technique

Sampling

Plan for data collection

Data processing and analysis

Ethical issues

Preliminary data or pilot study

Safety issues

Additional training,

if required

CollaboratorsSlide14

Questions to ask yourself

Steps to take

Key elements of each step

What is the problem and why should it be studied?

Selection, analysis and statement of the research question

Identify the problems

Prioritising the problems

Analysis of the issues

Justification for studies

What information is already available?

Literature review

Published literature

Databases

Prelim data

Why do you want to carry out the research and what do you hope to achieve?

Formulation of research objectives

General aims

Specific objectives

Hypotheses to be tested

What additional data do you need to meet your research objectives? How are you going to collect this information?

Research methodology or study design

Type of study

Variables

Data collection technique

Sampling

Plan for data collection

Data processing and analysis

Ethical issues

Preliminary data or pilot study

Safety issues

Additional training,

if required

CollaboratorsSlide15

Questions to ask yourself

Steps to take

Key elements of each step

What is the problem and why should it be studied?

Selection, analysis and statement of the research question

Identify the problems

Prioritising the problems

Analysis of the issues

Justification for studies

What information is already available?

Literature review

Published literature

Databases

Prelim data

Why do you want to carry out the research and what do you hope to achieve?

Formulation of research aims and objectives

General aims

Specific objectives

Hypotheses to be tested

What data do you need to generate to answer your research questions? How are you going to collect this information?

Research methodology

Type of studies

Variables

Data collection techniques

Sampling – power calculations

Plan for data collection

Data processing and analysis

Preliminary data or pilot study

Collaborators

Additional training,

if required

Ethical issues

Safety issuesSlide16

What do you want to do?

Why do you want to do it ?

Why is it important?

How are you going to do it?

What is the expected outcome?Slide17

Structuring your Research Plan

Hypothesis

Aims of the project

Background and importance

Work leading up to the project, including prelim data

Experimental design and methods

Summing up statement – helps to refocus the distracted reviewerTimetableSlide18

Budget

Work within eligible/ineligible costs for each funder/scheme

Realistic for the work proposed – offer value for money

Fully justifiedSlide19

Preparing an application

University

requirements:

Work with Maria to plan your budget – you’ll need to complete a

Costing

Request Form

so that a Project Application Form

(PAF) can be preparedA PAF must be prepared for all applications Once finalised, a PAF is signed by the applicant,

Massimo and MVLS Applications cannot be submitted until the signed PAF is returned to R&EFor all electronic applications, R&E have responsibility for final submissionSlide20

Place

Which host laboratory?

Supervision, expertise, facilities

Additional skills, new ideas, fresh challenges

Training acquired – generic, specific

Other training elsewhere?

If not moving, why?Mentorship – monitoring progress, assessmentRecord of supervisor/mentorSlide21

Preparation

Give yourself plenty of time –

everything

will take longer than you expect

The input of others will be hugely important and you need to give them sufficient time to do this properly

Box filling electronic applications and uploading required documents is rarely hitch free

The university’s costing and PAF processing can get backed up around major deadlinesSlide22

Lifecycle of an application

Full Applications

Short-listed for interview

Relevant Interview Committee

Awarded

Rejected

External referees

Relevant Funding Committee

with referees’ reports

Rejected

4-6

months

2-3

monthsSlide23

Take advantage of the opportunity to suggest suitable reviewers.

You can also ask for potential reviewers to be restricted

How are reviewers selected?Slide24

Why review a grant?Slide25

What are reviewers asked to do?

Is the research question hypothesis-driven and clearly stated?

Is research in this area needed?

Are there potential benefits for human/animal health?

Will this work significantly advance the field

Importance

Potential impactSlide26

What are reviewers asked to do?

Importance

Potential impact

Research environment

Feasibility

Track record

Can this project realistically be completed in the time available?

Is preliminary data included?

Is there a plan B?

Does this work fit with the applicant’s track record?

Has the applicant been productive with previous funding?

Are they competitive for their career stage?

Is the right place to do this work?Slide27

What are reviewers asked to do?

Importance

Potential impact

Value for money

Research environment

Feasibility

Track record

Data management

& sharing

Ethical considerations

Does the project offer ‘value-for-money’ relative to the potential outcomes?

Are the requested resources fully justified?

Is the work ethically acceptable?

Is animal usage justified?Slide28

Impact

Scientific (academic) impact

: how much value could the application add to the knowledge base in the area; is it addressing a key gap or question; is it high risk with the potential for high payback

?

Economic and societal impact:

how does this application fit into the wider societal context? Is likely to have scope to impact on treatment practices; or the wider policy context; or lead to novel technologies or improve the quality of life or economic competitiveness in the UK

?Slide29

Peer

review:

Comments you don’t want to receive

...it involves techniques with which the applicant appears to have no prior experience and for which no preliminary data are proposed

.

.

..

the work described in this application is over-ambitious, it could not be achieved in the life time of the

investigator.The poor writing, referencing and proof reading of this application significantly detract from its overall quality

.

I

had only one problem with this application, I had no idea what they were trying to do...”Slide30

Preparing for an interview

Practise, practise, practise

Know

your proposal thoroughly

Keep up with pertinent literature

Speak

to people who have been through this beforeKnow what to expect on the day

Bring your proposal with youSlide31

What next?

If your application is not

successful - d

on’t

give up…

Get as much feedback as you can – referees’ comments and interview

performance

Speak to your contact at the funding agencyIs there an opportunity to resubmit? Does the application have to be completely different?

Keep trying…Slide32

Intermediate

career:

3 to 6/7 years

postdoc

BBSRC

: David Phillips fellowship

CRUK: Career development fellowship

ERC: Starter Grants

Marie Curie FellowshipsMRC: Career development awardLeukaemia & Lymphoma Research: Junior fellowship

Royal

Society: Dorothy

Hodgkin fellowship

Royal Society of Edinburgh: Biomedical personal research fellowship

Wellcome

Trust: Sir Henry Dale FellowshipSlide33

Senior

career:

More than 6 or 7 years

postdoc

BBSRC

: David Phillips fellowship

ERC:

Consolidator Grants Marie Curie Fellowships

MRC: Senior non-clinical fellowshipWellcome Trust: Senior fellowshipSlide34

Career Re-entry

A

number of schemes are offered to specifically encourage woman (usually…)

back

to research after a career break of at least 2 years:

British Heart Foundation: Career re-entry fellowship

Daphne Jackson Trust: Daphne Jackson fellowship

Wellcome

Trust: Career re-entry fellowshipSlide35

Want to be a PI? What are the odds?

http://

sciencecareers.sciencemag.org/career_magazine/previous_issues/articles/2014_06_02/caredit.a1400136

http://www.pipredictor.com

/

http://

www.cell.com/current-biology/abstract/S0960-9822%2814%2900477-1

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9:30 a.m. – 9:45 a.m. - Description

Getting started Massimo 945 am 1015 am Grant writing hints and tips Maria 1015 am 1045 am A reviewers perspective Massimo 1045 am 1100am Break 1100am 1145am ID: 603826 Download Presentation

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